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Biodegradable Trellis Twine Options (I'm Done with Nylon)

 
pollinator
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Over the past ten years, I have primarily used nylon cord as the trellis twine or netting as the support material for my garden trellises, but I have begun to notice a problem with nylon. It appears that nylon cord is highly vulnerable to degredation when exposed to ultraviolet light. The brand of nylon cord that I used last year had such poor resistance to UV damage that at the start of the next growing season, the cord disintegrated when tugged gently and the cord could easily be snapped in half like a toothpick releasing microplastics into the air and small, brittle nylon pieces. If this can happen in less than a year with nylon cord than it makes no sense to use it if the rope cannot be composted once the rope is too decayed to used any more.

I would like to hear some testimony about natural fiber rope materials based on how well they can last through the growing season without severely losing their strength. The material can either be commercially available (Hemp, Jute, Sisal, sinew) or only commonly available by hand-making the rope (yucca, basswood bark, milkweed bast, dogbane bast. Hopefully at least one of these natural materials can last through a growing season better than the nylon that I've been using.
 
pollinator
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Here is a jute twine net
Jute tweine Trellis-Netting-Climbing-Support-
 
pollinator
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Are you looking for rope or twine? Jute and hemp twine are pretty common. Where I live, jute will hold up for a year if left outdoors, rarely two. If you take it down and store it for the winter it can last several years though.

Here you can see examples of people making twine from many different plants :PEP make twine.

For rope, I just learned how to make rag ropes by hand (bedsheets work well).  Here is YouTube video showing technique:


 
Ryan M Miller
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Mk Neal wrote:Are you looking for rope or twine? Jute and hemp twine are pretty common. Where I live, jute will hold up for a year if left outdoors, rarely two. If you take it down and store it for the winter it can last several years though.

Here you can see examples of people making twine from many different plants :PEP make twine.

For rope, I just learned how to make rag ropes by hand (bedsheets work well).  Here is YouTube video showing technique:






Ideally, I would prefer working with two ply twine or cord since I had bad experience working in the past with single ply sisal cord that wasn't tightly spun.
 
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Have you thought about using wire?

We use the same wire that we use for the electric fence.

Found these:





source

source


source


 
master steward
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Although I do occasionally use twine, I mostly use bamboo stakes from my own plants. They'll frequently last 4-5 years in my climate.
 
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I used branches and dollar store sisal this year.
I also use twist ties to affix the plants to the supports.
 
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I second MK on the jute. I buy the normal jute from the hardware store and I have only had trouble once with it not lasting through the year. I generally can get a whole growing season out of it. Green beans, peas, and tomatoes. It is compostable so I don't bother trying to save it and untangle it from the plants. I just cut it down and throw the vines and twine into the compost pile in the fall, and then buy more twine the next year.

Keep in mind, most twines and ropes will have a strength rating of some sort. Holds up to 30lbs and the like. A higher rating would imply a stronger twine that should last longer. All natural fiber twines that I have seen come in different strengths, so read the labels.
 
Jay Angler
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Now's the time of year to harvest raw materials to make your own twine during the winter:
https://permies.com/wiki/105498/pep-textiles/twine-PEP-BB-textile-sand
 
master steward
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Usually he here, too. Though one year ago I had was an old flannel shirt, so I ripped it into strips, and used that. It made it through the growing season - just barely.
 
gardener
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I guess I'm confused about the question.

Do I use natural fibers in a twine/string form while doing outside tying-up things? Sure.
I carefully choose what I use to tie stuff up based on the expected use that thing is going to get and where it will be used.  If I'm tying plants to a stake, or making a temporary teepee or something I don't expect to ever use again, I use loose spun (twirled? very splitty?) string made out of something plant based. I have used cotton yarn left over from crochet, jute from the hardware store, cotton string from a kitchen supply store, and other similar sorts of string, twine, or single strand.

If I decide to use something that has a load bearing job to do, expect to reuse the tying material for whatever reason, or intend for the thing being tied to last for more than one year/season, I use plastic zip ties or cheap fencing wire. Cheap fencing wire/baling wire is probably the most useful thing I have around here. I lump it as a Vital Necessity along with hardware cloth, zip ties, clothespins, magnets, and a good pocketknife/multi-tool.

So, what do I think Random Stranger should use on their place? Dunno. I don't live where you live, nor have your thoughts and priorities. If you want something biodegrade-able, keep in mind it *will* biodegrade at it's own rate (as my mom recently discovered about her spiffy biodegrading trash bags). If you want something that doesn't biodegrade, go with an unabashedly non-degrading (or at least not quickly) zip tie, piece of wire, or plastic/wire strapping.

The answer for any sort of preference is always, "it depends".
 
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I use 100% cotton tobacco baling rope. It has lasted through two seasons and is on its third. I can’t remember where I got it locally. I have seen it for sale online but the postage seemed high. https://www.agcareproducts.com/products/11608-cotton-twine-2-lb-tobacco-balin
 
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I stopped using all nylon and other synthetic twines years ago for the same reasons you state.
Because I buy square bales of hay, I only buy from farmers who use natural sisal baling twine.  I reuse this for all tying up and trellising in the garden, along with branches pruned from shrubs, if needed.  The twine easily lasts the first season with no loss of strength and can be used again if stored indoors over the winter.  Otherwise, I just pull them down to compost the next Spring.
If you don't buy hay, this twine can be purchased in huge spools at farm supply stores, probably coming out a lot cheaper than small rolls at the hardware stores. It also has much higher breaking strength.
 
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As noted above, there is a spectrum of options depending on the strength, longevity, softness, and length needed for the job in hand.
Speaking as a former commercial fisher and lifelong gardener, here is my arsenal of cordage and their uses:

If I just have to secure a stem or two for a couple of months  I use a couple of long grass blades or a fibrous stem, twisted lightly to make it more flexible. These improvised garden ties won't stand tying in a knot where the cordage has to double back on itself, but they will hold a clove hitch very nicely because the cord continues int he same direction through the whole knot. I get any old stick for a stake and use a clove hitch to hold the stem or vine to it.

Next in strength and durability comes sisal twine, sold cheaply at every lumberyard.

Jute and cotton are stronger, and spun into a smoother, less  less fragile twine that will last two or three seasons rather than just one. Both are hard to find in hardware stores but readily available by mail order. Cotton ranges from kite string up to 12-ply or even 24-ply twine with a fairly hard finish and strength ratings up to about 60 lb https://www.uline.com/BL_3757/Cotton-Twine?keywords=Cotton+Twine&SearchKeyword=cotton%20twine

Jute is the stronger of the two and the twine is also softer, so it doesn't cut into plant stems either when tying or when there is a lot of chafe, as in windy situations.  https://www.uline.com/BL_3933/Jute-Twine Jute represents the best balance of price and strength and is readily available. I would use it for trellising if I didn't use metal.

Hemp is stronger yet, as well as soft and durable, but the price is very high. It's also harder to find.

If the object is to make a single tie an the item will be under a fair amount of strain, but cannot stand gouging or chafing, i.e. tying a tree to a stake, the best thing I've found is a strip of bedsheet. for applications where extreme softness is needed--no bark yet on a seedling--use flannel sheets. Small squares of flannel sheet are also ideal for transfering pollen in hand-pollination.

It's easy to assume that wire is stronger than vegetable fibers because it's metal and so hard. However, it loses it's flexibility after an initial bend or two and becomes quite brittle. This is called metal fatigue or work hardening.  I find that regular mild steel fence wire (rebar wire, baling wire) is lucky to last the season some years if there is much wind or heavy vines. And of course it is subject to rust, which is pretty fatal in something so thin.. . Copper or stainless wire is cost-prohibitive.

If you want to use metal for trellising, pre-made wire mesh is much more durable than stringing wire yourself. I use and love concrete-reinforcing wire. It's a 6" x 6" mesh that comes in a roll 7' wide. Even large hands can reach through it for picking.  Get it at the lumberyard. (anything for construction is cheaper than the same item for the specialty garden market)  It makes great tomato cages (recommended by Carol Deppe--it's what she uses) and terrific trellis panels. Ours have lasted about 10 years so far.
Also, it's regular mild steel so it rusts but it's heavy wire so it has a lot of life to it. The coating of rust makes it invisible in the garden, and you avoid the heavy metals that leach out of galvanized wire.

Some folks use hog panels. They are heavier mesh yet, heavy enough to be rigid. And they are galvanized. Expensive, but sold by the panel instead of a 200' roll.

if you are doing some fencing to keep animals out, and want a lighter, more easily bent or cut wire mesh that is also durable, a roll of orchard wire is the usual fencing option, and a piece of it could be used as trellis as well. It is lighter wire but galvanized for long life. The mesh varies from top to bottom. All of the vertical wires are 6" apart, but the horizontal wires are close together at the bottom, medium a couple of feet up, and wide from the middle to the top. The idea is that it keeps out rabbits and other small animals at ground level and larger animals up to it's 6' height. We use it for deer fence, with extra height from bamboo sticks that go up 2 additional feet. (Deer don't realize there's no mesh in between.) I have used scrap pieces to make trellis for peas, which need horizontal supports for their tendrils to grasp--unlike beans which can spiral up a pole.

At this point you get to rope. The natural-fiber rope on the market today is lacking quality because commercial users have all gone to synthetics. There are several levels of strength and flexiblity. Again, sisal is coarsest and cheapest, then jute, then hemp. A high grade of hemp has always been Manila, but I don't know if that term has been corrupted at this point. The best hemp cordage in the days of sail came from Riga in modern-day Latvia.

If you need greater strength and longevity than these natural fibers can give, it's worth knowing the properties of the various synthetics. Technically, only natural fiber cordage is called "rope." Synthetics are called "line". If you go into a marine store, you will get more respect if you remember that, as mariners still generally adhere to the name.

Nylon is quite strong and flexible. But it will stretch under load. It should never be used for towing for that reason--if the thing you tied to should give way for any reason, your towrope turns into a slingshot aimed at you. Nylon braid that's only 1/4 or less thick is capable of holding several 100 lbs, so it's a great choice in the emergency go-bag.  
Polypropylene doesn't stretch, and is quite strong, but not as flexible or soft. It also decays faster from exposure to UV in outdoor situations. Here in California I would only give it a season or two before it starts shedding strands and particles.
Dacron is the most expensive and has the best mix of strength, durability and flex. It's used by climbers, and boats that can afford it.

For short lengths, remember you can double what you have on hand, or even braid or twine lengths together to make a short strong piece of line, like braided strips of bedsheet.






 
gardener
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I like the idea of biodegradable twine and annual vine support, and thanks for the idea of checking a farm supply that supports hay farmers.  I have only seen the plastic baling twine and netting.  I’m going to look for the other.

Here’s another idea, if you want to make custom shaped trellis webbing with custom sized holes…

I used to make fishing nets, and learned the technique then.  The only equipment needed is a netting needle.  I am familiar with the flat ones, though there’s another one.  They come in different sizes. The size twine you are planning to use will determine what size needle you want.

Netting needle and twine are all you need.

For the process and knot structure, I suggest a web search for hammock making… or how to make or repair a fishnet.

It’s simple, and “adjustable” in that it can be made to fit any shape, in three dimensions if a person wants to.  A knotted hammock or string shopping bag would be a good project to get used to the process.

An average permie can likely take it from there. 😊. Being as we are a practical sort, and good at improvising.

Possibly someone will make a video demonstration, then everyone will be able to do it.

 
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I buy an all natural jute and similar cord at a Canadian store like Harbour Freight because it is the cheapest place to buy 100' or longer.

I have been doing this for years because whether it is jute that tied up tomatos  designated for composting in a bucket, or something stronger to hold up prickly canes that will be burned, it is much less trouble as well as less landfill of plastic if the cordage I buy is biodegradable.

I also buy bamboo all natural q tips which get used a lot in animal husbandry, so I dont have to go out of my way to the garbage bin.
 
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I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.
 
Megan Palmer
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If you are able to grow flax in your climate, I'd plant a few clumps. They were traditionally grown for rope making and are still used for basket weaving in NZ.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/flax-and-flax-working#:~:text=How%20M%C4%81ori%20used%20flax,nets%20and%20many%20other%20things.

I collect the seed pods and feed them to our chickens as a treat

The leaves can be split into thin strips and are used a ties around the garden. If I need them to be stronger, I plait the strips into the desired length.

They do become brittle as they dry off but a quick soak in water makes them pliable again.

There are always a few lengths looped outside the chicken coop ready to tie up bunches of greens for the chickens and when I run out, I harvest a few more leaves and tear them into strips.
20230922_105313.jpg
Clump of flax
Clump of flax
20230922_105131.jpg
Flax strips
Flax strips
20230922_105213.jpg
Plaited flax
Plaited flax
 
William Bronson
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I do a lot of gardening with horizontal trellis and fabric ties. I cut up tightly woven cooton bedsheet into 1.5 inches wide strips and wrap them around the vines of tomatoes and squashes. Due to the large contact surface area, the stems won't bruise or snap easily.
20230831_101351.jpg
Vertical squash growing with fabric strips
Vertical squash growing with fabric strips
20230704_080639.jpg
Trellising cherry tomato
Trellising cherry tomato
 
pollinator
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Two possibles.  

1.  What about wool?  The wool carpet we put in the garden down on the ground as weed block took several years to begin to rot and get fragile and that is after a decade as the home ec room carpet and nearly 20 years as our main household carpet.(we were still finding pins in it in the garden from its first life)  Would a good tightly twisted wool hold up?

2.  Back to closing wool sacks when we had sheep to shear,  mostly it was a cotton heavy string but one year we had a brown waxed(at least it felt waxy) string.(jute?, sisal?)  It was very durable outside and lasted several years outside.(roughly 45 years ago)  Maybe this description will jar someones memory.  Finding both waxed Jute and wax hemp twine on amazon so maybe one of them?
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Megan Palmer wrote:If you are able to grow flax in your climate, I'd plant a few clumps. They were traditionally grown for rope making and are still used for basket weaving in NZ.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/flax-and-flax-working#:~:text=How%20M%C4%81ori%20used%20flax,nets%20and%20many%20other%20things.

I collect the seed pods and feed them to our chickens as a treat

The leaves can be split into thin strips and are used a ties around the garden. If I need them to be stronger, I plait the strips into the desired length.

They do become brittle as they dry off but a quick soak in water makes them pliable again.

There are always a few lengths looped outside the chicken coop ready to tie up bunches of greens for the chickens and when I run out, I harvest a few more leaves and tear them into strips.



And now I know why that plant is called New Zealand flax!  I have only known it as an ornamental.

If a person can’t grow New Zealand flax, I bet just regular flax could grow in many climates where New Zealand flax doesn’t, and be pretty handy for similar things.
 
Kristine Keeney
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I was interested in the ide that fibrous plant leaves or stems could be used like that - informal, unprocessed (basically) strings for immediate use in the garden - so did some quick "one click" research.

I found that New Zealand flax can be grown from garden heat zones 11 to 7, with necessary adjustments for plants in the 7 and 8 zones to prevent plant death - the plants just don't like being frozen that completely. I don't blame them, since I don't either!

There are lots of flax options - of the Linum, not the Phormium variety. I mean, there are lots of Phormium (the New Zealand flax), but there are more herbaceous types if only because annual plants breed and develop different species so readily over time. There are lots of the Linum, flax varieties with a wide range of colors of flowers and that grow quickly. They still need 90 to 120 days of growth to finish their life cycle, but you *could* have a small patch of pretty flowers that you keep going just for string.
They grow from garden heat zones 5 to 9, so they do fill in the places where you wouldn't be able to keep New Zealand flax going past that first growing season.

Both New Zealand Phormium sp. and "regular flax" Linum sp. apparently prefer drier conditions and full sun, neutral soil, so I decided to take a quick look at some other options in fibrous plant leaves and quickly gave up on a "quick look" because there are way too many options.
I had thought that some of the longer leaved, more fibrous of the grasses might be good and ... grass plants are out there that have long fibrous leaves. You can make baskets and cord out of a lot of them, but the sheer number of species in grasses is mind boggling.

So, I cheated and hit up the Britannica website - Plant fibers according to The Britannica
They list what seems to be the commercial species name for the plants grown specifically for fiber, with a breakdown of the type of fiber (stem, leaf, seed puff) so you can get the sort of application you're looking for. Fibrous leaves seem to be a heading dominated by Agave sp. which makes sense to anyone who has ever grown or lived around agave and/or yucca plants.

I now have the thought of seeing if I can get a couple of local natives of the Agave family to set up in my garden. They'd make great foundation plantings for under windows, as part of a dryland garden display, or maybe  just a fun addition to a "might be an edible" garden.

I wouldn't have thought about the possibility of starting a "might be edible" or "for future string" garden, and I'm looking forward to the planning of it!
Wait. This sounds suspiciously like a new hobby. Maybe I don't want to dive in with plant research and sourcing until I finish a few other things first.  

 
master gardener
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I have very recently have become 'aware' of the products that I have used that might shed plastics into the environment and have been transitioning away from synthetics.

I tend to use stainless or galvanized wire for long term/permanent projects that require a strength rating and so far have had good luck.

For gardening, I tend to use either jute or butchers twine to help with trellising. On my bean trellis I use wire to run horizontally with twine vertical to help space out the wires and give the vines additional points to grab onto. I'm not convinced my trellis will be permanent so this makes it easier to 'break down' if I choose to move it. A few snips and I can 'roll' my trellis polls together snug and put them away.

I try to use what I have, but strive to make the best choices that I can. Sometimes you need to use a petrol-based product and shouldn't feel bad for it. I'm really curious now about trying to use netting needles to create some jute netting. A future project added to the long, long, long, long, long list of things I want to try.
 
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Timothy Norton wrote:A future project added to the long, long, long, long, long list of things I want to try.



I've given up on relying on the "must live to 100 to get through my projects" list, and will be moving some projects to the "when I reincarnate" list.
 
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