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Absolutely no one believes this is possible here (Wyoming)

 
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I Know I have a walnut tree in my yard!
 
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Location: Riverton, wy
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I live in riverton wy. There is one black walnut in town that is amazing. I have seen a few that struggle to survive. As for fruit trees, the successful trees are in extremely sheltered areas. I have planted a lot of expirement trees at my place. I need to build up my soul more. I planted apples and plumbs 5 years ago. They are still alive but they haven't grown any taller at all. They are getting thicker every year but they are still 3 foot tall. I have planted hazelnuts and a bunch of other things but they die and start new from the bottom. Chockecherries are growing like crazy so that's what I am planning for my wind break around my orchard.
 
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Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
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Lots of apple trees in the Bighorn Basin area.(north central WY with zone 4 border line zone 3)  Most are in really sheltered locations such as down in the bottom of canyons or on north facing slopes.  The ones out in the open on the semi flat typically have a higher winter kill rate about once every 15 to 25 years.  Usually we get a warm snap bringing the tree out of dormancy and then a cold snap killing the tree.  Best survivor here is of the old ones seems to be Wealthy.  Some of the trees in well protected areas are probably nearly 100 years old.  There are the remains of dozens of orchards around and I can point to about a dozen surviving orchards with the rest dead.  Many died from simple neglect rather than winter kill problems.

If you are out in the open I would suggest lots of wind break rows and look into french tree walls.(maybe put the apple on the shaded side of the wall and other fruit trees needing warmer sunny side.
 
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