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master stewards:
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stewards:
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  • Joseph Lofthouse
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master gardeners:
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gardeners:
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Photos of Joseph Lofthouse's Garden

 
Posts: 61
Location: PA, zone 6a
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I believe the male sterility is just a F1 problem. It happens a lot with intergenus crosses.
 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I preserved butternut squash pie filling last night. Both frozen and bottled. Sure looks pretty when done on a human scale by loving hands and with singing and dancing for the crop from seed, to harvest, to preservation.
bottled-butternut.jpg
bottled butternut pie filling
bottled butternut pie filling
frozen-butternut-squash.jpg
frozen butternut squash
frozen butternut squash
pressure-canner.jpg
pressure canner
pressure canner
 
gardener
Posts: 587
Location: Ontario - Gardening in zone 3b, 4b, or 6b, depending on the day
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Joseph, that looks delicious!
Do you have a recipe/general methodology?

That looks like it's more similar to Apple pie filling than what I normally consider squash pie, which would  be a nice change. Have quite a few squash hanging out in the basement that I need to use soon and live with someone who (gasp) isn't much a fan of traditional pumpkin pie.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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For bottling, I followed the recommendations of the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

The recipe is to peel and cube the squash and bring to boiling, then hot pack into jars and pressure cook. I peel them with a potato peeler. Seeds get saved and washed in a colander, then put under a fan to dry.

For quart jars at my altitude, and with my equipment, processing time was 90 minutes. I use a jiggling pressure gauge, because it's much easier (for me) to listen for an occasional jiggle than to watch a dial. Pints would have only required 55 minutes, and might have resulted in a better tasting product. However, quart jars hold about 16 ounces of pumpkin, and most recipes based on store bought pumpkin call for a 15 ounce can of pumpkin, so I used quart jars to match the expected recipes.

There was an error in the recipe. It said that 16 pounds of cubed squash was needed to fill 7 quart jars. The actual amount required was 9 pounds. Therefore, I froze the rest, also in 16 ounce packages. Except for what I ate for supper!
20201202_194116.jpg
Mmm. mmm. mmm.
Mmm. mmm. mmm.
20201202_174027.jpg
cubed butternut squash
cubed butternut squash
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I did the same type of taste testing with the pepo winter squash. Culled any with white-ish flesh (bleck), or with woody skins.

I wonder if the fruits with fuzzy skin would be resistant to insects and/or the diseases that they carry?

I avoided growing pepo winter squash for years, because I thought they were bland and tasteless. Then I said to myself, "Duh!". I realized that if I want great tasting squash, I can breed them myself, therefore, I started tasting every fruit before saving seeds from it. Just like I do with every other species. The flavor has come a long way in the 4 years since I adopted that strategy for the pepo squash. They are actually worth eating now!!! Yum.
lofthouse-pepo-winter-squash.jpg
Lofthouse pepo winter squash
Lofthouse pepo winter squash
pepo-squash-breeding.jpg
fuzzy skin and orange flesh on pepo winter squash
fuzzy skin and orange flesh on pepo winter squash
taste-testing-pepo-squash.jpg
Taste testing squash
Taste testing squash
pepo-winter-squash-seeds.jpg
Lots of pepo winter squash seeds to share
Lots of pepo winter squash seeds to share
 
pollinator
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I've often been impressed at the range of flavors in my C. pepo breeding project. There was one, which I'm trying to recapture, that was so incredibly sweet you could use it as a sugar substitute!
 
gardener
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:I've often been impressed at the range of flavors in my C. pepo breeding project. There was one, which I'm trying to recapture, that was so incredibly sweet you could use it as a sugar substitute!


I love this Ellendra.  If you would, please let us know if you can get it back.  I did a little searching and picked up seeds for a few hybrid C. pepo varieties that are said to be very sweet out of curiosity.  Will experiment with those a little to see what comes of it.
 
Ellendra Nauriel
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Greg Martin wrote:

Ellendra Nauriel wrote:I've often been impressed at the range of flavors in my C. pepo breeding project. There was one, which I'm trying to recapture, that was so incredibly sweet you could use it as a sugar substitute!


I love this Ellendra.  If you would, please let us know if you can get it back.  



Definitely! My plan is to try and develop it into its own consistent variety, and sell seeds.

This year the sweetest pumpkin I got was an 8 on a 0-10 sweetness scale. Last year there were 3 plants that produced 10s. Which raises the question of whether it was genetic or environmental, but still. It shows what's possible.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Experimental Farm Network is distributing my seed varieties this year. That frees up my time for learning, teaching, travel, writing, and generally being an elder. They are the near exclusive provider of the seeds that I grew on my farm. Their catalog went live today.

Experimental Farm Network

Other places which carry some of my varieties include:

Giving Ground Seeds
High Ground Gardens
Snake River Seed Cooperative
Wild Mountain Seeds
Seed Savers Exchange
Baker Creek Seeds
Resilient Seeds
Miss Penn's Mountain Seeds
Hawthorn Farm Organic Seeds
gift
 
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