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Wes Hunter
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Location: Missouri Ozarks
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"Buy it for life" is probably a stretch when it comes to muck boots, but we can hopefully at least approach the topic as "Buy it for a long time."

I'm looking for suggestions on long-wearing muck boots.  That's "muck" with a lowercase "m"--there is a brand of muck boots known as "Muck" boots, appropriately enough.

I'm currently on my third pair of LaCrosse.  I've worn out one pair of their Grange, one pair of their Burley, and am working on my second pair of Grange.  What I like about them:

1.  The fit.  They are snug through the ankle and relatively snug through the calf, so they don't flop around all over the place.
2.  The height.  I'm not sure of the measurement, but they come up nearly to my knees.  They're a good couple-few inches higher than most others.  This is a big plus, especially when walking through tall dew-wet grass, or wading into the pond or creek, or walking through the muddy corral in early spring.
3.  The rubber quality.  It's nice and pliable.  (But see below.)
4.  The look.  They're a nice medium-dark green, and I think they make me look like I know what I'm doing.  This is trivial, I know, but it is a factor.

What I don't like:
1.  For $100 (give or take), they seem to wear out rather quickly.  A pair will last me about a year before they start wearing holes, and perhaps two years before they're more or less entirely unwearable. Through natural movement, the rubber creases, and eventually these creases turn into splits, then into bonafide holes.

On the average, I'd guess I spend somewhere around one in three days wearing these boots.  On days I don't wear them alll day, I almost invariably wear them for an hour or two in the morning for chores.  So, they do get a lot of wear, but I would just like to get more wear out of them.

Maybe I'm asking too much, but do any of you have recommendations for particularly long-lived muck boots?
 
Diana Bell
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Well, I can tell you that "bogs" are NOT the boot to get! I would LOVE to know the answer to your question. I am currently trashing my 2nd set of bogs in a years time. Ugh For the price of those, they should really last a little longer.
 
Craig Dobbson
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I've gone through so many boots in the last 8 years.  Bog, Muck, L.L bean, timberland and more, just trying to find a pair that will last me more than a year. 

The worst ones: Bog and Muck boots do exactly as you say.  They split on the creases, and in warmer months they can be very warm to wear all day.  Not too bad on snow but terrible on ice. Waterproof until the rubber splits, then forget it. they stay wet for days inside.

I like my Bean boots because they aren't as bulky.  As long as I'm moving around, I can be out in -20F weather all day and still feel my toes.      They don't over heat in the summer but then again I'm not having to wear them all day during warm weather.  No mud... No boots.  That being said, they are still on track to wear out before I get through this next winter.  So that will be just about 2 years of useful life for this pair.  They do come with a lifetime guarantee so that's a bonus. 

I'd like to know what others are wearing, specifically in cold climates and where ice is an issue. 

 
 
stephen lowe
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I got a pair of Kamik boots, made in Canada, two years ago. They are still going strong. Really supportive in the boot and ankle area so they are great for the muddy mountains where I'm at. Also really warm. Come up to about mid-calf on me. Really good tread. I got them onsale for 80 bucks.
 
Travis Johnson
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I wear Muck Boots almost year around, and even logging and working in the barn with sheep I get two years out of them. That is $50 a year so I am happy with that cost.
 
laurene eldred
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Boy, I was just pondering this question.  When I was in Canada I bought a pair of Baffin boots and loved them, but they are now worn out and Baffin no longer makes the same style.  I quit buying Muck Boots when I stepped onto a wet concrete floor and ended up on my back.  Absolutely dangerous. However,  my adult sons love them, and live in them working outside in the winter.  Like Craig, I prefer non-bulky because my feet can stay warm in cold weather.  I have looked at LL Bean, but they don't cater to wide feet.  So....I have been looking and pondering.  Hope to see some more replies with suggestions.
 
Larry Bock
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I lived in AK for a bit, because of the wet climate at times, " cannery boots" seemed to be the choice of footwear. What's nice is the come with two pairs of insoles that you can alternate and are not as heavy as the steel toed " Aroostic county cowboy boots" that I used to wear.
  They are brown with tan toes, light weight,reasonably priced and seemed hold up pretty well. Add a pair of decent wool sox and are pretty comfortable
  You could always tell the cruise ship tourist from the locals in Juneau. All one had to do... Was look down.  Larry.  I will see what brand they are and post the mnfg later on todsy
 
Bobby Keeland
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Location: Southern Louisiana
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I used to wear LaCrosse when working in the cypress-tupelo swamps of South Carolina. They lasted several years. Then I moved to Louisiana where I again worked in cypress-tupelo swamps, but the newer LaCrosse boots rarely lasted more than a year. I believe that the makers of most knee boots or hip waders use a lot of plastic in addition to a little bit of rubber in their boots. Plastic does not bend a nicely as rubber and even without use it ages and starts to crack. I now use Muck Boot Company ankle shoes for work in water or mud. I also need some knee boots but all that I've found are pretty much worthless. I have not yet tried a Muck knee boot. I expect that they will work well and I don't work on wet concrete.
 
Drew Moffatt
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I'm not sure if they're sold in other countries but we have two pairs.
First pair is skellerup Quattro insulated for winter and deep mud always full height and then some skellerup 4x4s for summer which are pretty tough boots. My current pair recently split at the heel but that's ok because I've had them at least 3 years and they were not new when someone left them behind after a party(farmers party everyone wears gumboots)
 
C Bennett
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I only buy made in the USA, Canada, or Europe. In shoes, I agree with the poster who mentioned Kamik, I get their snowboots and rainboots, which are Made in Canada and/or the USA, with few exceptions. Strong boots. There's also Danner in Portland, Oregon. Wolverine, made in Michigan. Belleville. Carolina.
The list goes on. A quick google search will find them. And yes, they are usually more expensive, but not always, and you get what you pay for, as you have discovered.  Plus, you get to support the American economy, not china. Here's a good site - http://www.americanmadeworkboots.com/ - and they have sale prices as well.
 
Rez Zircon
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I buy the cheap Servus brand boots. They're $20, plus or minus, at Tractor Supply. (Higher elsewhere.) I wear them 3-5 hours a day, about 8 months of the year depending on the weather. Can't do without 'em. It's to where if I don't have two fresh pairs stashed on the shelf, I think I'm out.

-- Comfortable; they don't make my feet sore or tired.
-- Not too narrow in the toe box, no lumps, not too loose in the calf (they come to just below the knee)..
-- The rubber stays reasonably flexible even in cold weather.
-- Soles are about the right degree of stiffness. I can still feel the ground, but don't get bruised feet.
-- Thin cloth liner which along with Costco Ugly Socks apparently wicks enough to prevent really soggy feet.
-- Made in USA which makes a huge difference (Chinese rubber is not cured correctly, and cracks prematurely).
-- Removable insole, which doesn't slide around (and lasts as well as the boot).
-- Tough. I managed to stab one pretty good with a nail, and didn't quite put a hole in it. (In fact the stretch mark eventually disappeared.)

I get a couple good years out of a pair, and even then they're not really worn out. They get rotated to summer-only as the soles wear down and lose the micro-tread. When they're new, they're pretty good on snow and ice. In winter I usually have an extra pair with cleats permanently attached, for when it's really slick (if my barnyard didn't slope so much, I might not need cleats).

Unlike some other boots, I've never had the soles crack, even when all the tread is worn off. Never had cracks in the main body of the boot, either. They will sometimes develop a tiny crack just above the heel spur (figured out this is actually from putting them on, not from everyday wear), but not until they're already got a lot of miles on 'em.

I also buy a pair one size too big to use as winter boots, with extra socks. Makes a nice intermediate between uninsulated boots and deep-cold Sorels.

I've had lots of different rubber work boots over the decades. These are by far the best of the lot.

 
Byron Gagne
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Don't like them, feet get to sweaty!  If it was my choice don't bother buying.
 
Ray Moses
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Location: Brighton, Michigan
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Muck boot brand seemed to start wearing out real soon, less then six months started leaking so I switched to Under Armor brand, seem to last a little longer. I get about a year out of them but will wear them daily from October through end of April.
 
R Scott
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Rez Zircon wrote:I buy the cheap Servus brand boots. They're $20, plus or minus, at Tractor Supply. (Higher elsewhere.) I wear them 3-5 hours a day, about 8 months of the year depending on the weather. Can't do without 'em. It's to where if I don't have two fresh pairs stashed on the shelf, I think I'm out.

-- Comfortable; they don't make my feet sore or tired.
-- Not too narrow in the toe box, no lumps, not too loose in the calf (they come to just below the knee)..
-- The rubber stays reasonably flexible even in cold weather.
-- Soles are about the right degree of stiffness. I can still feel the ground, but don't get bruised feet.
-- Thin cloth liner which along with Costco Ugly Socks apparently wicks enough to prevent really soggy feet.
-- Made in USA which makes a huge difference (Chinese rubber is not cured correctly, and cracks prematurely).
-- Removable insole, which doesn't slide around (and lasts as well as the boot).
-- Tough. I managed to stab one pretty good with a nail, and didn't quite put a hole in it. (In fact the stretch mark eventually disappeared.)

I get a couple good years out of a pair, and even then they're not really worn out. They get rotated to summer-only as the soles wear down and lose the micro-tread. When they're new, they're pretty good on snow and ice. In winter I usually have an extra pair with cleats permanently attached, for when it's really slick (if my barnyard didn't slope so much, I might not need cleats).

Unlike some other boots, I've never had the soles crack, even when all the tread is worn off. Never had cracks in the main body of the boot, either. They will sometimes develop a tiny crack just above the heel spur (figured out this is actually from putting them on, not from everyday wear), but not until they're already got a lot of miles on 'em.

I also buy a pair one size too big to use as winter boots, with extra socks. Makes a nice intermediate between uninsulated boots and deep-cold Sorels.

I've had lots of different rubber work boots over the decades. These are by far the best of the lot.



Not the most comfortable, but win by a large margin in every other category. 

When I need comfort, I buy lace up gore tex cordura hinting boots.



 
Cheli Bremmer
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Rez, I was looking at the Servus boots and you can get them for $15.00 at Dick's Sporting Goods... And one question: do they run large or to size? I have to convert to mens from and it's always tricky when ordering online.
 
Rez Zircon
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Cheli Bremmer wrote:Rez, I was looking at the Servus boots and you can get them for $15.00 at Dick's Sporting Goods... And one question: do they run large or to size? I have to convert to mens from and it's always tricky when ordering online.


That's a good price, if the shipping doesn't kill you. I've been paying $20-$25 at Tractor Supply, but they were $40 at Murdoch's!

Well, let's get out the measuring stick:

My foot: 9.5" long, 3.75" wide (standing, ball of foot)

The men's and women's are not quite identical. I buy both as they fit me a little different. Men's are a little roomier for the size of the boot, so are better for doubled socks (or very wide feet) without having to go really oversized. Women's fit a little closer so are better for walking around all day without wearing holes in your socks. (They aren't bad for that, actually, at least with Costco Ugly Socks. I no longer buy any other socks.) They're identical otherwise, except for color.

Sole measurements:
Women's size 8 -- 10.5" long, a hair under 4" wide. This fits me about right with single socks. A little loose but not sloppy.
Men's size 7 -- 10.8" long, a hair over 4" wide. This is loose and sloppy with single socks, snug with double socks.
.
The toe box has some height (enough for my high arches) and it flexes sideways on the foot, so the effective width is actually a little more. They don't shrink with age, but may develop a little more give (they feel tighter when new).

So I'd say they run more to large than small -- that is, they're the size I expect shoes to be!! Seems to me most shoes have shrunk, as used to be I could reliably wear any tennis shoe or boot in a men's 7 or women's 8 (I have no idea about dress shoes, tho) but nowadays that's a whole size too small !!

I should add I'm nitpicky about how shoes feel -- I notice every irregularity and can't stand asymmetry or lumps. I try them on in the store, and usually the first pair I try is fine. Once in a while one will be a little off, but I suppose that's just the hazards of mass-producing an injected product.

 
Becky Proske
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I'll echo the brand Kamik, I have a pair of their Hunter boots and I am pleased with them. I've had them for a couple of years and they are holding up well, but they might not be receiving the same level of wear as mentioned by others. My Kamiks are insulated and I wear them mostly during chilly spring and fall wet weather. I have worn them through summer but only briefly to do morning chores. The boots where stiff and uncomfortable at first when brand new. But thankfully that changed over time with wear. They now bend adequately and I find them comfortable for walking great distances over uneven terrain.

I understand the frustrations of finding a durable pair of muck boots that will last. I've spent some time researching brands before I bought my current pair. Here are my top reasons for choosing Kamik.

- Removable, washable liner, (in fact I think this will be the first thing to wear out, but super easy to mend or replace)

- Kamik has a recycling program for their boots. Okay, so I might have to pay a bit to ship them to Canada. But the option is there. I'll gladly support a company that shows responsibility for sustainability. At the time I bought my boots, I found a list on their website of boot styles that are recyclable (not all of them are). I simply choose one from this category that met my needs. And the best part is, I discovered my local farm supply store stocked this very brand and boot. No need to buy online.
 
P Nati
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I work in the woods and have tried many brands of rubber / neoprene boots over the years and am also an avid fisherman/hunter that has gone through many pairs of expensive waders. Any pair of rubber boots will wear out at the flex points no matter what brand and eventually lead to a hole. I am new to this site so I apologize if anyone has already mentioned this in the past but if you use a product called aquaseal to treat the holes you will expand the life of your boots.  It is flexible, binds to neoprene and rubber and lasts a long time. I believe divers use it for their wetsuits. I have gotten an entire extra year of heavy seasonal use from my boots using this stuff. Have also tried other types of rubber cements used for shoe repair but they do not come close to working as well as aquaseal. The only problem I have had with this product is that a good portion of the tube hardens up after you open it for the first time. For this reason I try to make the most of it when I open it for the first time.
 
James Freyr
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I recently forked over $180 for a pair of timberland pro's. I needed a waterproof farm boot, so I picked up a slip on laceless pair. Let me share a bit of my history with footwear, which also applies to clothing for me as well. I have no desire for fashion or brand name and therefore don't spend a lot of money on clothes and shoes. The last thing I'm trying to do is be trendy or impress other people. So I have been buying cheap shoes, sketchers for that matter. I can get a brown, quite plain looking shoe for like $40 bucks. And within four to six months the soles crack and the insides of the shoes get wet if I wear them in the rain. I'm a simple guy, and one thing in life I want is dry feet. So I have been going thru two to three pairs of sketchers each year cause they're crap. I expressed my lament to my wife and she replied "it's because you buy cheap shoes - spend more and they'll last longer". I was skeptical, and still am, but I mentioned this to others and they said the same thing. I know just because something costs more doesn't mean it's higher quality, and it can be tricky to thin the herd of expensive things to get the ones that will bring longevity. I realize shoes are like tires on a car. They will wear out. I'm just looking for one that I can get at least three years out of and time will tell if I have it. Three years of regular wear sounds like decent life in footwear to me. I've enjoyed reading all the other responses in this thread and when these timberlands bite the dust I'll certainly consider some of the other makes mentioned here.
 
Lorinne Anderson
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For those interested in the Servus Boots this is the link for where to buy their products.  Just enter your zip/post code or move around the map.

http://www.honeywellsafety.com/CA/Where-to-Buy/
 
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