• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • jordan barton
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Liv Smith
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Beau Davidson
  • Heather Sharpe
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Natural Building.

Adobe bricks are essentially cob building blocks, where a large portion of the drying time (which can be significant) is done before the building process begins. They can be used to build a large list of items very quickly, including RMHs, built in furniture, ovens and even whole houses.

To make adobe bricks you need an adobe form. Typically a wood frame, open at the top and bottom for forming cob into bricks. Wet the adobe form by dipping it in water, place it on bare ground and toss in a wet-ish cob mix (literally tossing in handfuls, throwing it down hard will eliminate air pockets). Level the mix off to the top of the form, then pull the form away, leaving the wet brick behind. Wet the form between bricks. Repeat. When dry enough to move without deforming, flip the bricks on their narrow edge to finish drying.

Minimum requirements:
  - Make 12 bricks
  - 12” by 6” by 3”

To get certified for this BB, post the following as pictures or video (<2 min):
  - Show your mix and tools
  - Action shot
  - Bricks drying on edge
COMMENTS:
 
steward
Posts: 38207
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kirk,

Might there be two or three decent youtube videos that you like that we could embed in this BB?
 
pollinator
Posts: 172
Location: Point Arena, Ca
43
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:Kirk,

Might there be two or three decent youtube videos that you like that we could embed in this BB?



Dunno.  I'll search around.
I might have images too.
 
Kirk Mobert
pollinator
Posts: 172
Location: Point Arena, Ca
43
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't have any good images (or at least haven't found any) of making adobes in my stuff.

There are a few videos,

I think this one is one of the better ones:


This guy is always excellent. I think he makes it hard on himself with an overly dry mix. (and yes, he's making a kiln to fire stuff, the process is pretty much the same)


 
steward
Posts: 12712
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3579
3
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved BB submission
Knocked this one out at the 2019 PEP1 event at Allerton Abbey.  Sifted soil to remove rocks.  They had clay slip and chopped straw in barrels already on site.  Used 3 pails of sifted dirt, 1 pail of straw, 1/3 pail of clay slip and some water to make a wheelbarrow full.  Please note that the recipe is site specific so your soils may vary.  That filled 8 molds at 6" by 12" by 3.5".  

Put some water and slip in the wheelbarrow first.  Then added the dirt and mixed with a hoe.  Added water slowly (Don't do too much!!!).  Then added the straw and mixed it in.  Then shoveled it into the forms and poked it in with fingers and used a board as a screed to level them.  Left them sit overnight and popped the form off in the morning and stood them up to dry.  My bricks are the closest row to the wheelbarrow.

I'd humbly suggest changing the requirements to be 3-4" thick so that a 2x4 can be used to make the forms.
20190529_100806_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_100806_resized.jpg]
Sifting station (with tools)
20190529_100821_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_100821_resized.jpg]
Filled form (mine is on the right)
20190529_101237_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_101237_resized.jpg]
Flipping up my bricks
20190529_101557_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_101557_resized.jpg]
Clay slip (rehydrating more for next time)
20190529_101627_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_101627_resized.jpg]
Chopped straw
20190529_101439_resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190529_101439_resized.jpg]
Stacked to dry. Aren't they prettier than Jeremy's and Baylee's?
Staff note (paul wheaton) :

I certify that this BB is complete!

 
Posts: 78
Location: North Carolina Foothills
74
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved BB submission
Made some adobe bricks. The sandy dirt was screened and mixed with a bit of clay, straw, and water. It was pressed into the mold. Since the mix wasn't too wet, I could remove the mold fairly soon after and place the bricks on their sides to fully dry.
IMG_20190528_134216.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190528_134216.jpg]
IMG_20190528_141117.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190528_141117.jpg]
IMG_20190528_144829.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190528_144829.jpg]
IMG_20190528_153811.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190528_153811.jpg]
IMG_20190529_101148.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190529_101148.jpg]
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this BB is complete.

 
gardener
Posts: 814
Location: Durham, NC
313
hugelkultur gear urban cooking building writing woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Haasl wrote:

Added water slowly (Don't do too much!!!).  Then added the straw and mixed it in.  Then shoveled it into the forms and poked it in with fingers and used a board as a screed to level them.  



Hey Mike, I'm curious: why did you add straw to the bricks? Wouldn't they burn out and leave voids? Wouldn't they be insulative rather than absorbative? Guess I don't totally get what's going on here.
 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 12712
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3579
3
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm not an expert on cob or adobe but I think the idea is that these bricks are for structural or building applications, not fire ones.  So the straw is insulative and structural.  I think...
 
gardener
Posts: 1229
Location: Washington State
705
2
forest garden trees rabbit earthworks composting toilet fiber arts sheep wood heat woodworking rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved BB submission
Here is my submission for the Natural Building - Sand - Make 12 Adobe Bricks BB.

To document the completion of the BB, I have provided the following:
- Make 12
- photo of my mix and tools
- an action shot
- photo of drying bricks, on edge
IMG_8024.JPG
Mixing Straw in to Sand/Clay mix
Mixing Straw in to Sand/Clay mix
IMG_8029.JPG
Throwing Mix into Form
Throwing Mix into Form
IMG_8032.JPG
Screed Process
Screed Process
IMG_8067.JPG
Standing Bricks on Edge
Standing Bricks on Edge
IMG_8069.JPG
12 Bricks on Edge
12 Bricks on Edge
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
Posts: 146
136
2
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved BB submission
Made 12 adobe bricks at the PTJ. Cob mix was approximately 2 parts sand and 1 part clay with a bunch of straw sprinkled in. Dried on a hot day in the shade to prevent surface hardening.
1B51DD34-80A6-45E3-A23C-46A8EE06D828.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 1B51DD34-80A6-45E3-A23C-46A8EE06D828.jpeg]
B9A3DF84-E833-424A-A72C-2A15CDFF74EF.jpeg
[Thumbnail for B9A3DF84-E833-424A-A72C-2A15CDFF74EF.jpeg]
711CA8A7-5808-406E-B859-152F0040BC1F.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 711CA8A7-5808-406E-B859-152F0040BC1F.jpeg]
9AEBD669-4A05-442F-801F-38D9E131FAF0.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 9AEBD669-4A05-442F-801F-38D9E131FAF0.jpeg]
70E3CDB0-63F2-4040-ABBD-FE37FD174D5D.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 70E3CDB0-63F2-4040-ABBD-FE37FD174D5D.jpeg]
2CE86A94-77E7-4300-B444-B5127D38096F.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 2CE86A94-77E7-4300-B444-B5127D38096F.jpeg]
2637F1A9-4AB2-48C8-ABE2-997C54AC5083.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 2637F1A9-4AB2-48C8-ABE2-997C54AC5083.jpeg]
310737E2-5D35-45F6-AB56-DAB1D01A8C3D.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 310737E2-5D35-45F6-AB56-DAB1D01A8C3D.jpeg]
576703E6-8CE7-408C-A47F-8A612BFD0336.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 576703E6-8CE7-408C-A47F-8A612BFD0336.jpeg]
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts -Marcus Aurelius ... think about this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Plans - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic