Win a copy of Bioshelter Market Garden this week in the Market Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

Suggestions for perennial vegetables or fruits?

 
Posts: 25
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I try to add a least one perennial vegetable or fruit each year but I am out of ideas for what to add next year. Here is what I have so far:

Tree collards
Cosmic Lights kale
Stinging Nettle
Cardoon
Asparagus (I had to replant this year due to my previous plants dying)
Daylilies
Gladiolus (edible flowers)
Musk Mallow (I only eat the flowers)
Chickory
Bamboo
Blackberries thornless and wild Himalayan
Strawberries June bearing and everbearing
Raspberries several types
Blueberries
Yacon
Ulluco Queets
Sunchokes
Oca Bolivian Red
Oca Black
Oca Golden
Oca OE Blush
Oca Sunset
Herbs. Chives, sage, rosemary, oregano, lemon thyme, and regular thyme, Lemon balm, peppermint, chocolate mint, fennel (I only use the seeds) and horseradish.
A few wild edible weeds. Plantain both narrow and broadleaf, Dandelion, Self Heal, Lawn Daisy, Wood sorrel (don't care for it but can't kill it), Sheep sorrel, and Purple Dead Nettle.

I think that is it. I have and do eat all of these (except the Ocas and the Ulluco as they are new this year and still not able to be harvested). I don't have room for trees but anything bush or smaller would fit. I really want some more greens if I can find some perennials that like my Oregon coast climate. The only things I don't want are plants with toxic parts as I have ducks and geese roaming my garden. Most things are fenced off but I want to be as safe as possible for their sakes.

I am planning on trying to get some perennial Arugula, Turkish rocket, and also perhaps Good King Henry if I can find them. I might also try getting some Mashua but I have no idea on good-tasting varieties. If you have any suggestions for good to eat perennial greens or fruits (bush or smaller) I would really like to hear it. Varieties of plants suggested would be great if possible too.
 
Posts: 104
Location: Australia, Now zone 10a, costal, sandy, windy and temperate.
7
goat dog trees books chicken food preservation
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Try this book...Perennial Vegetables: From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, A Gardener's Guide to Over 100 Delicious and Easy to Grow Edibles
by Eric Toensmeier

Wiki says this.....

Abelmoschus manihot, edible hibiscus
Allium ampeloprasum, perennial leek
Allium cepa aggregatum, potato onion
Allium × proliferum, tree onion or walking onion
Allium schoenprasum, chives
Aralia cordata, udo
Arracacia xanthorrhiza, arracacha
Artocarpus altilis, breadfruit
Asparagus officinalis, asparagus
Atriplex halimus, saltbush
Basella alba, Malabar spinach
Beta vulgaris maritima, sea beet
Blitum bonus-henricus, Good King Henry
Brassica oleracea acephala varieties, tree collards or tree kale
Brassica oleracea alboglabra, kai-lan
Bunias orientalis, Turkish rocket
Camassia spp., camas
Canna edulis, achira
Capparis spinosa, capers
Capsicum baccatum, aji amarillo
Capsicum pubescens, manzano chile
Carica papaya, papaya
Cicorium intybus, chicory
Cnidoscolus chayamansa, chaya
Coccinia grandis, ivy gourd or perennial cucumber
Colocasia esculenta, taro
Crambe maritima, sea kale
Cynara cardunculus, cardoon
Cynara scolymus, artichoke
Dioscorea bulbifera, air potato
Helianthus tuberosus, Jerusalem artichoke
Ipomoea batatas, sweet potato
Lablab purpureus, hyacinth bean
Manihot esculenta, cassava
Nasturtium officinale, water cress
Nelumbo nucifera, lotus
Oxalis tuberosa, oca
Phaseolus coccineus, runner bean
Plantago coronopus, minutina
Rheum rhabarbarum, rhubarb
Rumex acetosa, sorrel
Rumex scutatus, shield-leaf sorrel
Sauropus androgynus, katuk
Scorzonera hispanica, black salsify
Sium sisarum, skirret
Smallanthus sonchifolius, yacón
Stachys affinis, crosne
Suaeda pulvinata, seepweed
Toona sinensis, fragrant spring tree or xiāngchūn
Vasconcellea × heilbornii, babaco papaya
 
Posts: 31
Location: the mountains of western nc
3
forest garden trees food preservation
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hostas.
 
pollinator
Posts: 235
Location: East tn
56
hugelkultur foraging homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So, its not a perennial, but it is low maintenance and comes back each year. Its just so tasty you might consider sow thistle.
 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Davis wrote:So, its not a perennial, but it is low maintenance and comes back each year. Its just so tasty you might consider sow thistle.



I totally forgot about sow thistle. We have some around here but my ducks and geese usually eat it up. They love it and rarely leave me any I could harvest. Good to get the reminder of it though so thanks.
 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

greg mosser wrote:hostas.

Any varieties you think are the best eating? I do have some shady areas that they should do good in.
 
Posts: 59
Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
23
hugelkultur purity forest garden
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tivona Hager wrote:

greg mosser wrote:hostas.

Any varieties you think are the best eating? I do have some shady areas that they should do good in.



oh man. I love sauteed hosta sprouts. I planted 20 of them this spring just to get myself ready for spring 2020.
 
gardener
Posts: 1515
Location: Los Angeles, CA
368
hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Artichokes.

Sweet potatoes and cherry tomatoes might as well he a perennial, the way they continue to volunteer year after year.
 
pioneer
Posts: 81
Location: Sydney, Australia. Subtropics
31
forest garden urban medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not sure what climate you're in, but here's my perennial collection:


Leafy greens:
Ceylon spinach (1 green and 1 red stem variety)
Cranberry hibiscus
Warrigal greens

Vegetables:
Chilacayote (fig leaf gourd)
Choko
Scarlet runner bean
Winged bean

Fruits:
Pepino
Incaberry/cape gooseberry

Root crops:
Jerusalem artichoke
Queensland arrowroot
Ginger
Tumeric
Sweet potato

Herbs:
lemon balm
Culantro

Other:
Soapwort
 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Love the suggestions. My main issue here is having little summer heat. Winters are wet mostly with it getting light frosts but no bitter lasting cold. So many things will grow but won’t produce much with out the summer heat.
I have ordered 4 different Mashua but would like to have a couple more things for starting next year. Any tips on hosts varieties? Do you prefer Good king Henry or sea kale?
 
Posts: 97
Location: Hamburg, Germany
5
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As far as I can tell re: hostas, they're bred in the west for beauty not taste.  If you find one with a Japanese name, that might have been bred for taste.  Otherwise I've been buying for size, both to mix it up visually with my existing smallish ones, and for more bang-for-the-harvest.  (sadly you pay a premium for big, so can't say bang-for-the-buck)

I find GKH bland and sea kale interestingly bitter (but I like bitter) but neither is standing up to weed pressure in my garden.  

I do like Turkish rocket - very hard to kill, millions of seeds, spicy leaves.  I also planted some mixed wild German greens (wild arugula, salad burnet, and sorrel) in a planter so I could learn to recognize them and they are taking over the patio.  (like, growing up through the bricks, argh)  Salad burnet is really pretty and delicate, and competes with the lemon balm!

This year I also planted perennial buckwheat - https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fagopyrum+dibotrys - it is lovely and prolific.  It is also very aggressive.  It's a relative of Japanese knotweed so I vaguely worry I've loosed another monster, but it seems thus far to be penned in by grass.

I didn't notice any vines in your list.  Steven Barstow recommends Hablitzia tamnoides - https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hablitzia+tamnoides - so far all my starts have been instantly eaten by slugs, but I'll try again next year!  Also, you could try hops - the shoots are supposed to be very tasty and the hops themselves smell nice even if you don't want to brew with them.

How big of a bush would be your limit?  For example, I have two linden trees that want to be 50 feet tall, that I am keeping trimmed to about 7 feet tall.  (They could also be coppiced, but my major goal is to block out the view of an annoying neighbor.)  The young leaves are AMAZING, melt-in-your-mouth tender.

Oregon grape would be an obvious choice for you, if boring.  They're common here as an ornamental so I've been gorging myself on them from parks, and found a nice dessert recipe that isn't just "add sugar, make jam": https://www.backyardforager.com/oregon-grape-curd-recipe/

I know everyone talks about currants all the time, but they're low-care and heavy-bearing.  I had never had them before moving to Europe and red currants are so deliciously tangy!  It took me a while to warm up to the weird spice in black currants, but I have to say that standing in the middle of a bush harvesting is being surrounded by the most heavenly scent ever.  I eat lots fresh, give away, and dry them as raisin substitutes.  I've also planted a couple golden/spice currants, and they flower super early in the spring with a lovely scent.  So far no fruits to report on.
 
Morfydd St. Clair
Posts: 97
Location: Hamburg, Germany
5
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rather than keep editing my reply forever, I'm replying again.

Camass would also be a logical native for you.  I just planted a few this spring and have many bulbs coming soon.  The only worry for you is that Death Camas is also native there, so you'd have to be careful to keep that out.

I've been trying to get skirret established but the slugs loooove it too much.

I've gotten most of my information from here, Permaculture magazine, and several books, including:
Steven Barstow:  Around the world in 80 plants - heavy on the alliums, but really cool plants!
Eric Toensmeier:  Perennial vegetables - practical, inspirational
Martin Crawford: How to grow perennial vegetables - practical, UK-based which is good for your climate
Anni Kelsey:  Edible perennial gardening - also UK-based, probably no new plants for you, but nice all-around intro

And I totally forgot to say:  You have so many already!  You have a really interesting, diverse mix, and congratulations for being able to nurture so many plants from all over!
 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Morfydd St. Clair wrote:Rather than keep editing my reply forever, I'm replying again.

Camass would also be a logical native for you.  I just planted a few this spring and have many bulbs coming soon.  The only worry for you is that Death Camas is also native there, so you'd have to be careful to keep that out.

I've been trying to get skirret established but the slugs loooove it too much.

I've gotten most of my information from here, Permaculture magazine, and several books, including:
Steven Barstow:  Around the world in 80 plants - heavy on the alliums, but really cool plants!
Eric Toensmeier:  Perennial vegetables - practical, inspirational
Martin Crawford: How to grow perennial vegetables - practical, UK-based which is good for your climate
Anni Kelsey:  Edible perennial gardening - also UK-based, probably no new plants for you, but nice all-around intro

And I totally forgot to say:  You have so many already!  You have a really interesting, diverse mix, and congratulations for being able to nurture so many plants from all over!


Wow. Thanks for all of that information.

I have tried several various vines but they failed usually from the lack of heat. The Hablitzia tamnoides sounds promising though and I will add it to my list to try next year.  Slugs should not be a problem with my ducks thinking they are candy. We used to have an Oregon grape across the road a few years ago but it died with no care and probably to much crowding. Oddly I am having a hard time finding some again. I love curds though and am going to bookmark your recipe link so I can make it next time I find some.

I do have a couple of places I can fit something larger in so the linden is a nice idea. Not sure if I can find it easily but if I see it I’ll try to get it. It sounds great as long as I place it well and can trim it down a bit. I know that they do grow around here but had totally forgotten about them. It might take me a few years but I like having the plan for it.

I have been debating on the camass. My main problem is trying to find the perfect spot for them. Maybe next year I can get the spot that I think they will do well ready. I don’t want them to be crowded out or get to wet and rot. I have never seen any death camass but I have seen one of the blue edible ones in the wild about a decade ago and a state away. I have been tossing the idea around for awhile now of getting some but I did find a place that sells it so I can get some when I am ready.

The hostas I guess I will just have to try. Hopefully I get some that are good tasting.

I also like bitterness so I will try to order some sea kale seeds. Are they hard to start? I think I read that somewhere. I get some of the Turkish rocket too if I can.

I have the book Perennial vegetables by Eric Toensmeier but haven’t read the others. I see if I can check them out.

Again thank you for all the suggestions. You gave me ideas and reminded me of a few I had forgotten about.
 
Morfydd St. Clair
Posts: 97
Location: Hamburg, Germany
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tivona Hager wrote:
Wow. Thanks for all of that information.

I have tried several various vines but they failed usually from the lack of heat. The Hablitzia tamnoides sounds promising though and I will add it to my list to try next year.  Slugs should not be a problem with my ducks thinking they are candy. We used to have an Oregon grape across the road a few years ago but it died with no care and probably to much crowding. Oddly I am having a hard time finding some again. I love curds though and am going to bookmark your recipe link so I can make it next time I find some.

I do have a couple of places I can fit something larger in so the linden is a nice idea. Not sure if I can find it easily but if I see it I’ll try to get it. It sounds great as long as I place it well and can trim it down a bit. I know that they do grow around here but had totally forgotten about them. It might take me a few years but I like having the plan for it.

I have been debating on the camass. My main problem is trying to find the perfect spot for them. Maybe next year I can get the spot that I think they will do well ready. I don’t want them to be crowded out or get to wet and rot. I have never seen any death camass but I have seen one of the blue edible ones in the wild about a decade ago and a state away. I have been tossing the idea around for awhile now of getting some but I did find a place that sells it so I can get some when I am ready.

The hostas I guess I will just have to try. Hopefully I get some that are good tasting.

I also like bitterness so I will try to order some sea kale seeds. Are they hard to start? I think I read that somewhere. I get some of the Turkish rocket too if I can.

I have the book Perennial vegetables by Eric Toensmeier but haven’t read the others. I see if I can check them out.

Again thank you for all the suggestions. You gave me ideas and reminded me of a few I had forgotten about.



I'm glad to have been helpful!

I haven't been able to get sea kale to grow from seed, but I am a very mediocre gardener.

Along those lines, I don't know if my lindens will really accept hard pruning so hard for so long.  I may just be torturing them, and have to cut them down when, I dunno, the roots lift the cottage foundation or something.  However, they are supposed to coppice well, so here's hoping.  (Aside from blocking a view, the other reason for me not just coppicing is that rabbits love eating all my trees until they're at least an inch in diameter.  I figure new shoots would be a rabbit buffet.)

I was checking www.pfaf.org to refresh my vague memories of an American linden (there is!  tilia americana, shockingly.  However, PFAF have the food value for that as only a 3, as opposed to 5 for my tilia cordata) and realized I'd forgotten to recommend their books too.  They're available from their site and from Amazon, in both paperback and ebook form.

I spend way too much time on the PFAF site, and it's really useful.  I hope it is/will be useful to you!
 
pollinator
Posts: 277
43
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love perennial plants- so much easier to not be re-seeding every few weeks!

Capers
Marjoram
Asian garlic chives (essential to making north Chinese dumplings)
Scallion
Lemongrass
Chillie
Spinach (biennial)
Chard (biennial)
 
Posts: 27
Location: Southern Germany
7
kids chicken cooking fiber arts bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Morfydd St. Clair wrote:
I was checking www.pfaf.org to refresh my vague memories of an American linden (there is!  tilia americana, shockingly.  However, PFAF have the food value for that as only a 3, as opposed to 5 for my tilia cordata) and realized I'd forgotten to recommend their books too.


I guess I have to do some reading on the food qualities of linden trees. Up to now I only value them for their nectar (for my bees).
Not pruning in the strict sense, but guiding the growth of a linden tree was done in the 19th century in Germany. The so called "Tanzlinden" (dance lindens) were either used as platform or as shelter for dancefloors.
Here you can see some of the fascinating trees:
https://www.google.de/search?q=tanzlinde&sxsrf=ACYBGNRpM59q3O0om2DzJnVlwrUsqVofGg:1572765694122&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiH9ozkwM3lAhUKwsQBHVDcC00Q_AUIEigB&biw=1600&bih=757
 
pollinator
Posts: 711
Location: Southern Oregon
124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A shrub that I like for mild climates in Pineapple Guava. It's deer resistant, beautiful and tasty.
 
Posts: 117
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Aronias, Ramps, and Sorrel.

Aronias:  A couple of bushes are all you need.  We have currants, and gooseberries but neither even comes close.  We also have sea buckthorn as well but they just don't taste very good and are hard to pick.  Blue Honeysuckles just don't produce much
Ramps:  Here in Zone 5 they are ready by April 1st.  They spread at a ratio of around 1 to 3 every season.
Sorrel:  Richter's out of Canada's variety Profusion won't bolt, and will produce right through the heat of the summer.  Keep splitting them and very shortly you will have more than you need.  Better pesto than basil.
 
pollinator
Posts: 209
86
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One I'm really looking forward to eating and working with more next year is sweet pea, a type of wild perennial pea that grows around me and I've finally started getting established on my property.  The official name is Lathyrus latifolius.  The flowers are absolutely beautiful as well.  Apparently you can eat the peas, fresh or dried, the whole pods when still young and tender, and the tender shoots which includes the growing tips of the vines throughout the year.  I usually see them growing in large masses which would provide an abundance of food with zero work beyond harvesting once established!

Editing to add in that Su Ba did raise the point in the post below that many sweet peas are considered toxic.  Some consider this type toxic as well.  I first read about the edibility of these in one of my foraging books as I noted below in another post.  Researching it a bit more online some say it's toxic others say it's edible.  We're in the situation these days where there doesn't seem to be any real authority everyone trusts.  My personal take away from what I've read is that they might be toxic if eaten in "large quantities" which seems to be considered more than 30% of your diet!  That can likely be said for spinach too, and many other common foods.  This is the site I found that seems to have the most to say directly on the matter.  https://honest-food.net/the-myth-of-the-poison-pea/

This is the first site that comes up in my search engine that says they are poisonous.  https://homeguides.sfgate.com/lathyrus-latifolius-edible-104906.html  It looks like a regional news organization whose stuff I've seen before promoting the idea that wild food is dangerous.  Personally I don't give them too much weight.

Here is the North Carolina State Extension which says they are edible, though it doesn't offer much detail.  https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/lathyrus-latifolius/

Finally here is a Plants for a Future site that lists them as edible but with a caution, noting no records of toxicity for the plant have been found but that some species in the genus contain a toxic amino acid which is what everyone seems to be concerned about.  https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Lathyrus+latifolius
sweetpea.JPG
[Thumbnail for sweetpea.JPG]
 
pollinator
Posts: 1579
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
550
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was under the impression that sweet peas were mildly toxic. Some varieties are far more toxic than others. The neurological damage can be cumulative, with damage being noted months later. I think I would need to research sweet peas before I'd be planning on eating them.
 
David Huang
pollinator
Posts: 209
86
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found the sweet pea I mentioned in the book "Midwest Foraging" by Lisa M. Rose published by Timber Press.  That said, just because it's in a book doesn't mean it's true either!  I've eaten some, but not large quantities yet.  I haven't noticed any issues, but then if it's cumulative who knows.  I may look into it a bit more too.
 
Posts: 25
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I bought some perennial "thicket bean" seeds from Oikos. Vining type that bears less than commercial beans, but allegedly tolerates subfreezing cold to re-emerge each spring. I also have some alleged perennial potatoes from them as well. Not sure if they would resist blight growing in the same spot forever, but I'll try them early next year.
 
Posts: 36
Location: Zone 6a
3
food preservation medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Haskap or Honeyberry, which is a non invasive honeysuckle that grows an edible berry similar to the size (and some say taste) of a blueberry.  Haskap is the Japanese name and it basically translates to: fruit of long life and good vision  It is very high in Vit. C and Antioxidants and has other benefits as well.  Also virtually pest and disease free and hardy to zone 1.  They don't particularly like heat, so they should do okay in your climate.  
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2043
Location: Manitoba, Canada
626
cattle hugelkultur monies duck forest garden fish fungi earthworks building rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm not sure what you already have but here are a couple more ideas:

Gogi berry (wolfberry)
Saskatoon/Serviceberry/Juneberry
hardy kiwi (vine)
highbush cranberry
nanking cherry (or other cherries)
seabuckthorn/seaberry (nitrogen fixing)
 
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow! You’ve got a great variety of plants.

Here are some of my favorites.

Walking or Egyptian onion. I just dug up some for my pot roast.

Swiss chard.  One overwintered one or two seasons ago, riight outside my front door. It’s pretty and feeds me breakfast, lunch or supper.

Pentland Brig Kale or tree kale.

How about artichoke? It’s a coastal plant.

I just bought al dwarf mulberry.

Not sure if Passionfruit will grow where you are,  But it’s a lovely, vigorous vine with delicious fruit. Passiflora edulis “ Frédérick” is what I have.

I’m in Northern California, bit inland but not hot Central Valley.

And thanks everyone for chiming-in. I, too, could use some new ideas.



Tivona Hager wrote:I try to add a least one perennial vegetable or fruit each year but I am out of ideas for what to add next year. Here is what I have so far:

Tree collards
Cosmic Lights kale
Stinging Nettle
Cardoon
Asparagus (I had to replant this year due to my previous plants dying)
Daylilies
Gladiolus (edible flowers)
Musk Mallow (I only eat the flowers)
Chickory
Bamboo
Blackberries thornless and wild Himalayan
Strawberries June bearing and everbearing
Raspberries several types
Blueberries
Yacon
Ulluco Queets
Sunchokes
Oca Bolivian Red
Oca Black
Oca Golden
Oca OE Blush
Oca Sunset
Herbs. Chives, sage, rosemary, oregano, lemon thyme, and regular thyme, Lemon balm, peppermint, chocolate mint, fennel (I only use the seeds) and horseradish.
A few wild edible weeds. Plantain both narrow and broadleaf, Dandelion, Self Heal, Lawn Daisy, Wood sorrel (don't care for it but can't kill it), Sheep sorrel, and Purple Dead Nettle.

I think that is it. I have and do eat all of these (except the Ocas and the Ulluco as they are new this year and still not able to be harvested). I don't have room for trees but anything bush or smaller would fit. I really want some more greens if I can find some perennials that like my Oregon coast climate. The only things I don't want are plants with toxic parts as I have ducks and geese roaming my garden. Most things are fenced off but I want to be as safe as possible for their sakes.

I am planning on trying to get some perennial Arugula, Turkish rocket, and also perhaps Good King Henry if I can find them. I might also try getting some Mashua but I have no idea on good-tasting varieties. If you have any suggestions for good to eat perennial greens or fruits (bush or smaller) I would really like to hear it. Varieties of plants suggested would be great if possible too.

 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So many great ideas. I will be able to keep adding some for years.

I have made a couple of orders Now and have 3 more Ulluco coming, 3 different Mashua, Crosne, hog peanut, 3 bulbs of camass so I can see how they do, a red Jerusalem Artichoke.  I have an unknown variety that was given me probably, white Fuseau but I am guessing, all I know is that it isn’t Stampede as I have had them before and the one I have now is different.

Also included in the orders were Achocha Cyclanthera brachystegia and Jacob’s tears. I also have three different hardy kiwis to plant as well as 1 hosta.

Some of these were added as the cost was negligible and the shipping was fixed already by the other things I was ordering. I am still wanting to get some currants and sea kale and if I can find them for next summer.

Now all I have to do is figure out were to put all of the plants I have coming.

Thanks again everyone for all the wonderful ideas.
 
T.J. Stewart
Posts: 36
Location: Zone 6a
3
food preservation medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where did you order from?
 
Tivona Hager
Posts: 25
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

T.J. Stewart wrote:Where did you order from?



Some from Peace Seedlings and some from Norton naturals.

I have received the Norton Natural order but am still waiting on the one from Peace Seedlings. They are still harvesting and not ready to ship yet.
The Norton’s order looked good and they included extras on the items I ordered.
 
gardener
Posts: 684
Location: South of Capricorn
194
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What a great list. You're going to have fun!

Tivona Hager wrote:
Also included in the orders were Achocha Cyclanthera brachystegia and Jacob’s tears.  



Job's tears makes good tea. As for Achocha, it will self-seed well enough if it doesn't live through the winter (I'm in 9B and it will die when it gets cold), but keep an eye on it, it will totally take over if you don't keep on top of it.
 
It's just like a fortune cookie, but instead of a cookie, it's pie. And we'll call it ... tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!