• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • r ranson
  • Nancy Reading
  • Anne Miller
  • Jay Angler
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Matt McSpadden
  • Rachel Lindsay
  • Jeremy VanGelder

The House Dress! best of all worlds

 
steward & author
Posts: 35579
Location: Left Coast Canada
12413
8
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've just discovered something that I didn't know existed but always wanted: the house dress!

Here's an overview of what it is.



Basically, it's a simple dress made for ease of movement that one wears around the house.  It's easily washable, comfortable, and the only thing stopping it from being PJs is that it's a dress and we don't have to deal with the embarrassing moment when unexpected people arrive at the front door for a visit.  

This would probably be easier than training my geese to attack unscheduled guests.  

It would also solve my issue of filming youtube videos in my housecoat or dirty farm clothes.  

So basically I want to learn all about house dresses, how do I get one, how do I make one, and is there also a version for when I don't want to put on the heat - like a housecoat but fancy looking?  
 
master steward
Posts: 11234
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6234
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My friend's mother used to wear one much of the time and she had them sewn for her out of 100% cotton bed sheets. I'd suggest you don't choose any bedsheets you don't want strangers at your door seeing!
 
r ranson
steward & author
Posts: 35579
Location: Left Coast Canada
12413
8
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm going to see if I can just buy one or two to try it out.  Failing that, I'll keep an eye on quilting cotton sales.

Not sure how much fabric to get to make one dress.  It would be nice to have an idea so I can snatch up enough when a sale arrives.  4 yards?  
 
master steward
Posts: 14899
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4114
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My mother always wore a house dress.  If we were going out she would change into street clothes.

Her house dress was similar to the one in the video except her house dress never had a waist.  There might have sometimes been a tie belt around the waist though not always.  If I remember correctly they were cotton broadcloth and usually pink or light flowers.

I always wore play clothes until my teen years.
 
master steward
Posts: 7865
Location: Missouri Ozarks
4155
6
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been wearing house dresses, for years. I love them. In fact... all of mine are in rough enough shape(because I also wear them to garden and feed & water the critters, and collect eggs) mine are beginning to get to the point of being ready for their next incarnations. I have some that are more for winter, when it's chilly in the house, and some for summer - and they're all very threadbare. One of the ways I acquire them, is when a dress for wearing in public becomes not so presentable, it becomes a house dress, so a couple of my winter ones are sweater dresses.

I think it's time to treat myself to some new ones.
 
Posts: 51
5
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In a warm climate, loose dresses are also cooler than tee shirts and whatever. For me they need to have enough pattern to hide small spills and splashes, must be of a practical fibre (nothing that will melt) and lack of pockets is a definite dealbreaker.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2903
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
927
dog forest garden urban cooking bike fiber arts
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A 'house-dress' doesn't have to look like such a house-dress of the 1960s.
It's just a comfortable dress made of washable material, and with pockets of course. I think 'jogging pants fabric' would be a good choice. Is that still available in 100% cotton?

I know in the subtropical climate of Curaçao they wear wide sleeveless house-dresses made in brightly coloured viscose (and it's said those are worn without any underwear).
 
Posts: 2
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My grandma always had housedresses, though she called it a housecoat. I love them and have them too! One perk is my other clothes last longer cause I don't wear them except when I go somewhere. Housedresses  are super comfy and easy to wear and wash and sew.
 
Posts: 40
15
2
  • Likes 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Heh...  I'm good in my overalls, but I spend more time outside in the garden than I do in my house so I guess that makes sense.  Overalls are loose fitting, comfy, lots of pockets, no worries about exposure front side or back side while bending over.  No skirt getting in the way when squatting.  I converted a worn out pair of overalls to a dress by chopping off the legs and adding skirting just so I could have the breezy-ness of a dress but still the utility of the overall pockets (I use them all) but the skirt kept getting in the way as I worked.  It is cute...but not as practical as I had hoped.
 
Carla Burke
master steward
Posts: 7865
Location: Missouri Ozarks
4155
6
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

carla murphy wrote:Heh...  I'm good in my overalls, but I spend more time outside in the garden than I do in my house so I guess that makes sense.  Overalls are loose fitting, comfy, lots of pockets, no worries about exposure front side or back side while bending over.  No skirt getting in the way when squatting.  I converted a worn out pair of overalls to a dress by chopping off the legs and adding skirting just so I could have the breezy-ness of a dress but still the utility of the overall pockets (I use them all) but the skirt kept getting in the way as I worked.  It is cute...but not as practical as I had hoped.



This is my experience with the overalls I've converted, too - but I've a couple ideas I'm thinking about implementing with at least the one, so maybe that will show up in these threads again, at some point. I also have to be very careful not to overload the pockets (wearable toolbox, anyone?), or I might as well be carrying a heavy purse, as far as the painful effects on my shoulders. But, as isolated as we are, I must admit, I don't worry overmuch about the possibility of accidentally flashing John or the critters, lol. And, if I'm doing any heavier work outside, I generally switch to britches. I only wear the house-dresses outside for light work.
 
Posts: 21
Location: High desert, Central Oregon, USA, Zone 3
2
food preservation greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love house dresses!

I've made a few very simple ones. I have a pattern for a more complex dress, with the button placket and collar (like those shown in the thumbnail of the video), but I haven't attempted to make one yet.

Dresses are so easy and you look pulled together if you have to run to town to check the mail and don't feel like changing.
 
Posts: 15
Location: rural P.E.I., Canada
10
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:I've just discovered something that I didn't know existed but always wanted: the house dress!  



I recently discovered house dresses. Last summer with the heat I found some long jersey dresses with short sleeve, flattering rusching on the top and empire waist with flowing skirt. They were light and comfortable for the hot summer and so much cooler! So I returned and bought 3 more in different colours. Everyone complimented me on how nice I looked in them. They flatteringly covered my top half, while being flowy and hiding my chubbiness on the bottom half so I felt a little better about my body image. They were cool in the summer heat, cooler than my usual attire of yoga pants/top. We recently started to get a little cooler fall weather here and I wanted something with long sleeves. Got another dress which has longer sleeves, a v-neck, and POCKETS. It's super stretchy  so it's comfortable no matter what I'm doing, reaching/bending etc. and again, I get compliments on how nice I looked. There is elastic ruffle at the wrist so when I shove the sleeves up to wash dishes, they STAY. These dresses wash and dry easily with no fuss. So I'm sold on the house dress idea (even though I didn't actually think of them in the term house dress until now). Aprons are great for keeping them a little cleaner when baking/cooking. And yes, when someone comes unexpectedly I'm not apologizing for how I'm dressed! The pockets are super handy and I do feel much better about myself in them. But the added benefit I haven't seen mentioned is that I do think it's better for the lady parts, if you know what I mean. Instead of the heat build up that you get in yoga pants, things get a little more air flow 'down there' and I think it makes for healthier environment.  I got this one on amazon and yes, it's a bit long but I have since hemmed it to a more practical length. Outside I still wear rugged denim if I'm doing really heavy or dirty work. But for the days I'm all day in the kitchen or doing other inside chores, the house dress is it!
HouseDress.jpg
[Thumbnail for HouseDress.jpg]
 
Posts: 102
Location: Dallas, TX area
69
2
cat forest garden greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is my favorite house dress! I made it in one afternoon and it's just rectangles and triangles made from less than 2 yards of thrifted linen-blend fabric. I will dress it up with a waist belt and cardigan when I go out.
20221103_141843.jpg
Green checkered house dress.
Green checkered house dress.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1455
Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
508
forest garden tiny house books
  • Likes 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm never embarrassed by what I'm wearing when people show up unexpectedly. It's MY house, and they weren't invited. They should count themselves lucky I'm not just in my underwear. If they are uncomfortable, good. Maybe they'll check in before showing up next time.

Having said that, on days when I'm doing light chores I have a couple sundresses I wear. If I have to run into town for something, they're nice enough I don't have to change. If it's a little cool for a sundress, the right style of long sleeved t shirt over top looks fine.
 
Posts: 43
Location: Southwest Oklahoma, southern Greer County, Zone 7a
3
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Elizabeth Horsley wrote:Here is my favorite house dress! I made it in one afternoon and it's just rectangles and triangles made from less than 2 yards of thrifted linen-blend fabric. I will dress it up with a waist belt and cardigan when I go out.



Your’s reminds me of my Grandma’s dresses. ❤️
 
Judy Bowman
Posts: 43
Location: Southwest Oklahoma, southern Greer County, Zone 7a
3
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My aprons are a lifesaver.
 
Posts: 19
Location: Chatham, Michigan
7
cat home care food preservation
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have two long loose-fitting dresses I wear whenever I can. They're sleeveless, so they're comfortable in the summer, and I throw on a cardigan when it's cool. The tops of them are rucked, which makes a bra optional. Just as comfy as a nightgown, but unlike a nightgown, I don't feel awkward stepping outside in them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 411
102
3
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I do have house dresses, 1 cotton knit and 2 woven cotton (La Cera moomoos). I like knit better as it molds to me no matter what I do. My plan is to go to the Hemp fabric store, and hopefully find some second rate knit cotton hemp fabric and sow a few as my are gettingr ratty. I like them basic - no waist and a bit larger to allow for easy movement. I change immediately if I have no plan to go anywhere for a while. I live in the city, so going out in them is not really a choice.
 
pollinator
Posts: 207
38
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Who, in their right mind would design clothes without pockets? That is as un-handy as a vest without sleeves...Ok, let me rethink that?...Where are ya supposed to carry your pocket knife for Heaven's sake?...spare change? Tic Tacs? ;
 
Posts: 6
1
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wear dresses all the time, have for many years, I am just never comfortable in pants. Simple dresses made by me or dresses and jumpers I bought from Katie's Mercantile in New York State. ( Sewn by farm wives as their side gig, not from some hideous overseas sweatshop)
My grandmas both wore house dresses, simple design, woven cotton fabric in smudge hiding prints. Always an apron over them and always pockets in the dresses and aprons both.
My mama was a 50's mama, red lipstick, blue jeans and flannel shirt were her go to outfit for housework. But when summer heat came along she wore cotton dresses too. They were functional, but also adorable.
 
Posts: 3
4
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:I've just discovered something that I didn't know existed but always wanted: the house dress!

Here's an overview of what it is.



Basically, it's a simple dress made for ease of movement that one wears around the house.  It's easily washable, comfortable, and the only thing stopping it from being PJs is that it's a dress and we don't have to deal with the embarrassing moment when unexpected people arrive at the front door for a visit.  

This would probably be easier than training my geese to attack unscheduled guests.  

It would also solve my issue of filming youtube videos in my housecoat or dirty farm clothes.  

So basically I want to learn all about house dresses, how do I get one, how do I make one, and is there also a version for when I don't want to put on the heat - like a housecoat but fancy looking?  



My grandma wore them all the time. She called them “dusters” because you wore them to dust and clean. If you google “cotton dusters” you can see more pictures as well as different types and where to get them. I’m sure you can probably find a few patterns for them.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=cotton%20dusters%20for%20women&iax=images&ia=images

 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Love the concept of a house dress, but in practice, I usually opt for aprons. Aprons with straps that sit on the shoulder, not around the neck. Aprons with no tie at the waist. Aprons with BIG pockets. Pockets big enough to carry multiple tomatoes/peppers/eggs, pruning shears, cell phone. I think if I wore a house dress, I would still cover it with an apron because aprons are awesome.
 
gardener
Posts: 802
Location: 4200 ft elevation, zone 8a desert, high of 118F, lows in teens
529
7
dog duck forest garden fish fungi chicken cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Melanie Jennings wrote:Love the concept of a house dress, but in practice, I usually opt for aprons... I think if I wore a house dress, I would still cover it with an apron because aprons are awesome.



I'm an apron person, as well.  Cooking aprons, and a work apron, and a couple that are multipurpose.  I wear them out even, which makes my husband laugh. Shorts and an apron, now that's a fashion statement ahead of it's time. (Or not of any...?)  I like the over the neck aprons for some things, but Melanie above has a great point and my work apron is the sort that crosses in the back, just goes over the arms.  That way I can carry heavy things without pulling on my neck.

Something like this one from Etsy below. It's easier than it looks to pull on or off.


I end up wearing aprons over my houseclothes, be they pants, shorts, skirts or dresses, because otherwise I will be filthy, oily and sticky.  I have no idea how my mom and grandmother got by (houseclothes, no aprons) raising children, when I can't stay clean with zero kids.  Hmmm.  Aprons save me from washing clothes too much, plus the clothes last longer. Dresses are nice in the very hot weather, but I've discovered that skirts and dresses are easily torn in the very prickly desert SW, so I tend to go for pants now.  And kneepads.  If you see a woman walking around with kneepads and a really dirty apron, say hi!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11234
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6234
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm big on salvaging things, and my friends know it. The Fish Apron I use when processing ducks, I replaced the tie at the back with clips from a backpack. That way I set it to my size and I just have to clip and unclip the strap, rather than tying a bow. The picture Kim Goodwin posted has straps very similar, so I thought some of you might be interested in the idea. In fact, now I'm thinking that maybe I should do the same to my house apron!

One of my big complaints about aprons I've been given is that they're too wimpy and just thin cotton. The apron I wear is a thicker denim, but it does go around my neck. I might be quicker at grabbing it if I actually changed all the straps on it!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
Posts: 2903
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
927
dog forest garden urban cooking bike fiber arts
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am not the 'dress type', I love wearing trousers (pants). I start the day in pajamas with a bath robe (in the other thread I told I have two of those, so they can go in the washing machine).
For kitchen work later in the day I have aprons.
And I agree: if someone shows up un-expected, they are welcome whatever I am wearing. If I like I will change clothes while they have their cup of tea/coffee in the sitting room.
 
Posts: 57
3
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One perk is my other clothes last longer cause I don't wear them except when I go somewhere.

Hasn't the world changed?! Many families used to change from school clothes to house/everyday clothes when I was a kid in the '60s and '70s. When I ran a tiny restaurant, I always wore an apron but have fallen out of habit. My mother's side of the family always wore housedresses. Although I think it's a great, frugal idea (saving wear and tear on one's "good" clothes) I don't know how it would translate in our -20 to -40'C/F winters!
Any suggestions?
 
gardener
Posts: 1491
Location: Zone 6b
973
forest garden fungi books chicken fiber arts ungarbage
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in linen or linen blend dresses in summer time as they are the only thing cool enough for me. Usually in a style between shift and sheath, with some waist definition from darts or belt but loose enough to pull on directly.

I feel some kind of waist definition is the key to make a dress for the house or the public. Here I found a midi dress from Boden. If you leave off the belt and add some lace or ruffles, it immediately turns into a night gown.
Screenshot_20221106-011206-2.png
Yoked gathered loose fitting long dress
Yoked gathered loose fitting long dress
 
pioneer
Posts: 178
Location: Hainault, Essex, England
44
trees tiny house earthworks food preservation building homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:I've just discovered something that I didn't know existed but always wanted: the house dress!

Here's an overview of what it is.



Basically, it's a simple dress made for ease of movement that one wears around the house.  It's easily washable, comfortable, and the only thing stopping it from being PJs is that it's a dress and we don't have to deal with the embarrassing moment when unexpected people arrive at the front door for a visit.  

This would probably be easier than training my geese to attack unscheduled guests.  

It would also solve my issue of filming youtube videos in my housecoat or dirty farm clothes.  

So basically I want to learn all about house dresses, how do I get one, how do I make one, and is there also a version for when I don't want to put on the heat - like a housecoat but fancy looking?  



Thank you for the video, r! Most of the year round I live in my dressing gown at home, but a house dress would be perfect in the summer. Goodness knows what my neighbours must think about me gardening in my wellies and dressing gown! It’s a good job I don’t care! I just like to feel comfortable.
 
Elizabeth Horsley
Posts: 102
Location: Dallas, TX area
69
2
cat forest garden greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John Duffy wrote:Who, in their right mind would design clothes without pockets? That is as un-handy as a vest without sleeves...Ok, let me rethink that?...Where are ya supposed to carry your pocket knife for Heaven's sake?...spare change? Tic Tacs? ;



I'm becoming a fan of my historical tie-on pocket. Also, you can always add in-seam or patch pockets to a dress.
 
pollinator
Posts: 176
Location: Idaho panhandle, zone 6b, 30” annual rainfall, sand & clay soil
137
2
foraging books food preservation fiber arts medical herbs bee
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

May Lotito wrote: I feel some kind of waist definition is the key to make a dress for the house or the public. Here I found a midi dress from Boden. If you leave off the belt and add some lace or ruffles, it immediately turns into a night gown.



The line between “nightgown” and “dress” is…wobbly. The Victorians would agree with your “waist definition” delineation, I think, but in current fashion it’s quite less clear. I’ve seen plenty of items marketed as nightwear that I’d absolutely wear as day clothing (though generally not to an office job, even on the very casual West Coast USA), and dresses I’d be fine with wearing as nightwear.

Ugh. Clothes can be so confusing. The rounded yoke on many “house dresses” from the 50s-80s doesn’t appeal to me at all, but there are lots of other options in this thread that do.
 
r ranson
steward & author
Posts: 35579
Location: Left Coast Canada
12413
8
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
 
pollinator
Posts: 873
Location: East of England/ Northeast Bulgaria
313
5
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is sooooo my style of dress! Thanks for sharing that with the free pattern.

Though mine will need more than 2 yards, for sure!
 
Joy Oasis
pollinator
Posts: 411
102
3
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That linen dress would be nice except that I do not like seam at the waist at all. Most linen dresses ready made have them, probably because it needs less fabric this way.
 
Jane Mulberry
pollinator
Posts: 873
Location: East of England/ Northeast Bulgaria
313
5
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like the style because I hate anything fitted over my tum and bum and don't mind looking like a fat, aging, boho (since that is what I am!)

But a lot of my friends who prefer either a more classic or more sporty style wouldn't wear a dress like this, either.
 
Joy Oasis
pollinator
Posts: 411
102
3
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jane Mulberry wrote:I like the style because I hate anything fitted over my tum and bum and don't mind looking like a fat, aging, boho (since that is what I am!)

But a lot of my friends who prefer either a more classic or more sporty style wouldn't wear a dress like this, either.



I don't like fitted either. I just would prefer not to have a cut at the waist low or high as it is not comfortable and very unflattering to many.
 
Shawn Foster
pollinator
Posts: 176
Location: Idaho panhandle, zone 6b, 30” annual rainfall, sand & clay soil
137
2
foraging books food preservation fiber arts medical herbs bee
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I made this dress in a nice purple cotton/linen blend. I graded up the pattern and waaaaaaay messed up the math so it’s now about 6 in/15 cm too big in the high waist seam and looks rather like a very large, purple potato sack. It’s in the naughty pile until I can summon up either the courage to take out all those hand-felled seams or come up with some other clever way to take it in.  Le sigh.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 14899
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4114
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have really enjoyed this thread.  I like watching the older shows and movies and when I see someone in a housedress I think of this thread.

I thought that Vivian Vance, who played Ethel on the Lucy Show wears the classic housedress though I can't seem to find a good example. It seems I remember something with pockets and she always had both hands in the pockets.

Here are some examples:


source


source


source


source
 
Jane Mulberry
pollinator
Posts: 873
Location: East of England/ Northeast Bulgaria
313
5
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ouch, Shawn! A cute purple potato sack! I have something in a similar style I designed myself but made from a thrift store fleece blanket. Looking like a potato sack would be an improvement on that one - I literally look as wide as I am tall. Though it is warm, which was the goal!

We all have those "naughty" piles. I must do something about mine someday.

Anne, love those vintage ILL images! That is classic house dress style!
 
master pollinator
Posts: 4641
Location: Due to winter mortality, I stubbornly state, zone 7a Tennessee
1976
6
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Shawn, care to post a picture of your booboo? Maybe all you need are a few well placed darts? This would require no picking of the bodice seams and a few more gathers in the waist.
 
F is for finger. Can you stick your finger in your nose? Doesn't that feel nice? Now try this tiny ad:
Botany Bonanza Bundle by Thomal Elpel
https://permies.com/wiki/240272/Botany-Bonanza-Bundle-Thomal-Elpel
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic