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Too Much Doom and Gloom... Name one positive outcome!

 
pollinator
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Chris Watson wrote:

Mike Haasl wrote:A lack of toilet paper may inspire greater use of bidets.  As this gentleman demonstrates:
https://redd.it/fmqd3j

And yet, the uncertainty of my job situation is making me very circumspect about where I choose to drop a Grand.


A grand? You can get one of the bidet attachment things for under $40.
https://www.amazon.com/Non-Electric-Bidet-Toilet-Adjustable-Nozzle/dp/B075983YXZ/ref=sr_1_5?qid=1584975128&refinements=p_36%3A1253529011&s=kitchen-bath&sr=1-5
 
Posts: 350
Location: London, UK
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Wow - just came across this VERY comprehensive link!  A real boon to those stuck inside and experiencing boredom...look no further!
https://chatterpack.net/blogs/blog/list-of-online-resources-for-anyone-who-is-isolated-at-home
 
master gardener
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Hi sonja,

God help me, yesterday I began reading Seneca.
 
pollinator
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I'm loving the whole thing! Hanging with my family all day. Getting the greenhouse sorted. Playing outside. Playing inside. Cooking all the things. This is the best thing ever!

Downside, studying is near impossible with 3 kids running around.
 
pollinator
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Lorinne Anderson wrote:CHALLENGE:  Name at least one POSITIVE outcome from the inevitable social distancing and self-isolation...GO!



I wanted to bump this tread because it's so important to keep looking for the silver lining (If i may be so bold maybe op would consider changing the title of this tread to "silver lining" or "one positive thing"?😁)

I just wanted to add one i thought off today:

NO SCHOOL= NO HAIR LICE!

🤣🤣🤣🤣
 
gardener
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ROFL.

As we were cleaning our store-bought produce in a weak bleach bath yesterday I was thinking that it can only be a good thing for reducing E. coli and hepatitis A and other food-borne infections, same with all this handwashing. It is what you're supposed to do in food service and we usually don't do it at home.

My silver lining was supposed to be all sorts of projects and gardening in this spare time that was supposed to appear. As it turns out, my work has absolutely skyrocketed as my clients suddenly have all sorts of contingency plans to translate and send back to their investors. I haven't had a month this busy in a long time (which is great, since I'm keeping my husband's business afloat and making sure his employees get paid). And the weather cooperated, with a long drought followed by a very cold snap, so I haven't even had much to do in the garden beyond water. Today I need to get out there and rip out my summer crops.
 
gardener
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John F Dean wrote:Hi sonja,

God help me, yesterday I began reading Seneca.


How's the reading going, John?
 
pollinator
Posts: 373
Location: Monticello Florida zone 8a
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I haven't worn shoes since spring break! It's awesome.
 
John Wolfram
pollinator
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So I went to my local big box home improvement store the other day, and the selection of super cheap seeds was completely picked over (only got lettuce, dill, and basil at $0.09 a pack) so I resorted to spending $1.50 a pack on some Burpee seeds.  While it was kind of annoying to spend a few more bucks on seeds than I was expecting, it pleases me greatly to know that a lot more people are gardening this year compared to last year.
 
pollinator
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Today I felt full of energy and the weather is warm and sunny these days, so I am getting a lot of things done in the garden.

As I think that fruits and veggies will definitely be more expensive this year, I am really motivated to clean up all available spaces for veggies and prune the two vines I have to make them more productive.

I have done more already than in most years, not only because I am motivated but because there are no appointments for me or the kids, no driving them to lessons or to friends etc.
When I look at my little plants in the house and greenhouse I sew future food!

Only downside: Many people are trying out new sewing patterns (several companies are publishing free patterns), are reading books or are diving deep into their hobbies like genealogy - but with five persons always at home it is not really easy to get some me-time (and laptop access). Well, I have to enjoy what I have!
 
pollinator
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All those relatives who mocked my gardening and self-reliance obsessions, are getting jolted out of their complacency.
 
Anita Martin
pollinator
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:All those relatives who mocked my gardening and self-reliance obsessions, are getting jolted out of their complacency.


Really? Congrats.
Around here most people don't rethink their ways.

But I sent my brother a sourdough starter and he might even venture to bake his first bread, and he is getting a bit more serious about remodeling his garden (no edibles yet apart from some basil and tomatos). And my sister-in-law (ex of my other brother) is starting seeds on her balcony and in the shady garden of her rented building (slugs eat most of the veggies, but she is trying). She will also try sourdough baking.
 
gardener
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I normally work from home and avoid most social situations, so the shelter in place hasn't really changed much for my life; however, the school district I work for has been doing distance learning since spring break was over, so work has been much slower. That's been a big silver lining, since it's allowing me more recovery time from surgery. It's also provided me time to re-sow things for the gardens of the crops that didn't survive the neglect while I was in the hospital.

While I still have some worries (my dad is considered "essential" because he works for a gas company, and my mom frequently has to go in public for "essential" things; overall I'm appreciating the opportunity to get my thoughts together. It's refreshing to be able to focus on my life without the email, phone, etc. frequently going off to notify me that someone wants something.

Hope you all stay safe during this series of events!
 
Amy Francis
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I am a semi recluse by choice and it's fine except I don't have the social network that I would like. I enjoy meeting new people.

Now that UK is in lockdown, ironically enough I am meeting LOTS of new people!!!  How??  Through zoom get-together of meetup groups!  It's really good!  Cuts out the travelling and it's instant social interaction right in my living room!  What's not to like?
 
pollinator
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More contact with far away family through calls and video conferencing.

Farm shops and local food generally is suddenly more attractive than the supermarket. They sell out every day.

I see a lot of families walking together.

Less traffic. My neighbour is suddenly sleeping through the night after years of living here.

Less time wasted shopping. Shops are closed anyway.

Lots of time to garden!

We're four weeks into confinement in Switzerland and government will soon present plans for deconfinement. I'll be sad and glad when it's over.
 
gardener
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Lorinne Anderson wrote:CHALLENGE:  Name at least one POSITIVE outcome from the inevitable social distancing and self-isolation...GO!



I haven't driven my car in over a month, I love not needing to use the thing.
 
gardener
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... all kinds of stories of the shitty care people get when the hospital's understaffed or overcrowded.

I think, like a relationship, society needs to get through a bit of hardship to be healthy and we've had it pretty easy for a long time.


I think that we have had it easy for a long time.  Much of the rest of the world has lived in a war zone, in famines, in economically downpressed situations, under severe totalitarian dictatorships, and we have lived a life of choice and virtual opulence in comparison.  That said, the divide between rich and poor, the 'lifestyle' of living paycheck to paycheck, the increasing control of governments over people's lives, these have all been on the increase, despite our freedoms.  i hope that coming out of this, there will be increasing recognition that people deserve a certain level of life that is free and unencumbered by the struggle to simply live, and the unnecessary intrusion and burdens of government.  

Certainly hardship brings out change and it potentially brings health.  I hope that the shitty care in the hospitals issue, the understaffing issue, the overcrowded issue, these things will be addressed coming out of this.  I personally think that the people will demand it.  I personally think we should demand it be addressed and accounted for far before bailing out big business.  This is my small additional hope.

I think that, like with the economy, there will be a time of reckoning coming out of this, as to what is truly necessary and what we, as individuals and society, really want to place value on.  Jan White hits on a number of points above, which lead us in the direction of the fact that society has lost some of it's vigor, its Joie de Vivre, it's ability to simply enjoy being together as families, and the craving for community and interaction, these things will gain a lot of new meaning, coming out of this.  I miss hugging my friends.  Standing apart, I am at a disconnect.  It is difficult.  But those embraces will feel all the more connected and appreciated when they are once again the norm.

I am going to a birthday party tonight.  A friend cleared all the brush out from under his trees over the past few years, greatly reducing his forest fire risk.  We are going to burn a huge pile of brush, each of us standing at least 6 feet apart, and toast his 62nd birthday.  It will be one small token gesture towards the community that we are all craving gets to function and interact again soon.  
 
pollinator
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:
I think that, like with the economy, there will be a time of reckoning coming out of this, as to what is truly necessary and what we, as individuals and society, really want to place value on.  



This is what I'm hoping as well.
 
pollinator
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The weird guy that makes strange machines and eats rabbits and quail and gardens a lot is now the smart cool guy thats ingenious and has food to share.
 
Posts: 122
Location: Ontario, climate zone 3a
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My stress levels have dropped, I'm getting things done at home, organizing, hemming and mending (and making some masks), and soon baking and canning.  It's a blessing in disguise that I am fully taking advantage of.  I am not happy that everyone I work with lost their jobs, but to be honest I needed a break so badly, and I just got one in the worst way.  Suddenly I feel rested, and interested in things again.  Two days ago I got out of bed and made breakfast and when I was done eating, I asked myself, "what do I want to do today?" That's not a question I even normally consider because it just isn't possible, it's just "ok, you have time for this now".  Often times I find that the things I want to do are home-related "chores" anyway, because they make me feel good!  My husband brewed a batch of beer a week ago and it's bubbling away in the basement waiting to be bottled - that will be us together, next weekend.  This time together absent from stress is a beautiful silver lining.  I'm sure I would feel differently if someone in my family was sick, but I don't know anyone who has been diagnosed.
 
Norma Guy
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Location: Ontario, climate zone 3a
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Mike Haasl wrote:A lack of toilet paper may inspire greater use of bidets.  As this gentleman demonstrates:
https://redd.it/fmqd3j



Mike that gave me such a good laugh, thank you!  "THIS... is a BOOTY-WASHIN' MACHINE" lol.  That's a brave man right there.

I have been wondering what to do next when the TP actually runs out.  We had a good supply of 48 rolls before the panic buying started (I'm usually a bit prepared), but the last couple of times we have actually gone to the store the whole TP aisle is empty, so it may come to "other measures" at some point.

I guess my next search on the Permies forums will be toilet paper alternatives, I bet there's lots!
 
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I wonder what will happen to the educational system.
Will people figure out how to learn on their own?
I don't really mean on their own but figure out how to do their own research and think for themselves.

 
Clay Bunch
pollinator
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craig howard wrote: I wonder what will happen to the educational system.
Will people figure out how to learn on their own?
I don't really mean on their own but figure out how to do their own research and think for themselves.



My wife has been a Montessori teacher and a government school teacher and finally she has become a homeschooling teacher for our children.

She tutors kids here and there to help with money that she used to bring in with a 9-5

For the past month she's had tons and tons of parents calling and begging that she tutor their kids.

The parents don't know what to do they need resources for this time but if people come up with attractive solutions then I believe some will stay homeschooled after this is over.

On the other hand I've spoken to a few friends in college and they say that if they had known that online classes were so great they would have saved a lot of money not going to conventional school and paying from dorms and apartments.

I bet this causes a big change in how colleges and universities operate.
 
Posts: 93
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In the last month I've planted:
6 apple trees
2 pear trees
3 blueberry bushes
7 rooted elderberry cuttings
10 asparagus crowns
75-ish strawberry
horseradish
rhubarb
onions
potatoes
other garden stuff
set up an arched cattle panel trellis in the fenced garden
ordered a drip tape watering system for the fenced garden
pampered all the milkweed starts
checked the garlic at least 1000 times.
 
Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish. -Euripides A foolish tiny ad:
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
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