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The Official Entomophagy Thread! (Eating Bugs)

 
pollinator
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Kim Goodwin wrote:

The best, in my tastes, are aphids.  Aphids grown on something you'd like to eat, specifically.  Not a poisonous plant - no aphids off a datura, for example.  Aphids off roses taste a bit like roses, aphids off brassicas have that slight brassica bite to them.  Aphids are sweet and quite innocuous.  And sometimes there can be quite a lot of them.  Whenever someone asks me how to deal with aphids, I suggest eating them, but thus far it has been one of my less popular recommendations.

Ants have that formic acid taste, and I didn't find them very pleasant to eat.



How did you eat aphids? Raw right with a leaf? I have some right now on my volunteer watermelon leaf, but not sure, if watermelon leaves are edible...:)
Ants how much I understand are best for making lemonade.
 
gardener
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Joy Oasis wrote:

How did you eat aphids? Raw right with a leaf? I have some right now on my volunteer watermelon leaf, but not sure, if watermelon leaves are edible...:)
Ants how much I understand are best for making lemonade.



Yes, I'd just eat them with or without leaves included.  But if you bring them in the house keep in mind they can escape and get on your houseplants.  That's a real pain to deal with.

Now I'm curious if anyone has tried tomato or tobacco hornworms?  Meaning hornworms that have only eaten a tomato plant, not a potato or tobacco or datura, etc.  Nothing too poisonous.

I collected a bunch today off a tomato plant.  I don't currently have birds, so I had nothing I knew to do with them.  I re-homed (hahaha) most of them on some wild nightshades and a tomato that isn't doing well.  I prefer to not kill things that I don't eat.

And that got me thinking - what if they are edible?

I came upon this recipe on the website Bert Christensen's Weird & Different Recipes:  Fried Green Tomato Hornworms

It even had an image.



Bert also has recipes for Fried Slug Fritters, Root Worm Beetle Dip, Ant Brood Tacos, and a whole host more of very unusual recipes.  A dessert looked good: Ant Venom Jellies

Sort of like Turkish Delight for anteaters.  Or ant eaters.
hornworms.jpg
Tobacco hornworms (I think) that were on a tomato plant
Tobacco hornworms (I think) that were on a tomato plant
 
pollinator
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Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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A major Canadian grocery retailer (Real Canadian Superstore) now sells cricket powder. Not cheap though, at CAD $13.26 per 100 grams. That's roughly USD $10 for 3-1/2 ounces (dry weight).

 
Joy Oasis
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If recipe says so, they must be safe to eat. If you decided to eat them, let us now, how did it go.
 
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Location: West-Central Missouri
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I hope this forum is still alive.  I dropped Facebook and my Wild Edibles of Missouri with over 32,000 members and my Missouri Entomophagy group with around 5,000.  I do public promotional programs on both topics and still want to keep my finger on the pulse of what's going on.  Did nine programs for my local public library system and a youth camp for girls in June, and have two libraries and a scout group lined up in July.  And, of course, I've got a couple annual presentations, one of which is featured in the back of David George Gordon's "Eat-a-Bug Cookbook".   AND, that map published by the UN is not right.  It shows the USA with, at best, 25 species of edibles insects.  I've got way more than that, just in my yard --possibly close to that many beetle species alone.
 
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Yes! we need more activity here, I really wish we could focus more on edible grubs.
Bee larvae is often forgotten, beekeepers sometimes want to get rid of the future "males" (?) and if you are lucky, some beekeeper are happy to give them away for free.
 
master gardener
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Location: southern Illinois.
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I too find this thread interesting.  I admit that the closest I have come to eating insects was the box of chocolate covered grasshoppers I bought in the 8th grade.
 
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Ate crickets once, fried in butter. Was part of a survival class : )
Saw this guy today.. I don't think I could eat it though.
https://vimeo.com/581667854
Maybe chocolate-covered?
 
Paul Landkamer
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Location: West-Central Missouri
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By grubs I'll guess you mean just about any sort of little worm?  Ragweed and corn stalk borers edible and good.  Bagworms (different from fall webworms and tent caterpillars, which are also edible, but irritatingly fuzzy) are good, and if picked off junipers/cedars, they've got a fairly strong gin-like flavor.  I cut down and harvest paper wasp larvae --mud daubers aren't really worth the mess.  Acorn weevil grubs are easy to collect...  Or am I way off with this?  I don't particularly care for the white beetle grubs found when gardening.  I find them lots better after they've become adults.
 
gardener
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chestnut weevil grubs are similarly very easy to collect, but you get more chestnut if you kill them sooner in the cycle!
 
Paul Landkamer
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Location: West-Central Missouri
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That's a bad thing about tomato/tobacco hornworms, too.  Gotta let 'em get bigger to make 'em worth picking, but they kill the plants if you don't get 'em tiny...
 
greg mosser
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you think they can transplanted to other plant relatives? maybe i’ll move a hornworm onto horsenettles if i find any.
 
Paul Landkamer
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Location: West-Central Missouri
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I know they eat both tomatoes and peppers --probably tobacco and other nightshades? I don't know if they'd be safe on the toxics.  Horse nettle (common names are fun --the thorny low grower with the yellow 'berries', right?) is among the toxics.
 
Paul Landkamer
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Location: West-Central Missouri
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Spotted 4 army worms out by some patchy dead grass.  Picked 'em up and went in and got my collection jar.  Got about 50 before it started raining.  They sure seemed to like hanging around the crabgrass.  They're in the freezer now.
 
Paul Landkamer
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Doll Divas Forum  Yeah, an odd sounding URL, but bear with me.  This Permies forum doesn't seem to like me to drag and drop files, so I had to create a URL and throw in some dolls, or, action figures to appropriatize (yep, a new word) the post for the forum.  The link has a bunch of book recommendations for you!
 
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