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What do you sleep on? Mattress Alternatives?

 
pollinator
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Thank you, Joseph. I could make my own then, maybe double layer, so I can just put comforter between layers for easy washing, hopefully it wouldn't slip around much, but I also could attach it with a few hand stitches, which  could take apart for the wash. Did you use upholstery thread or something like that since it has to hold lost of weight?
 
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Joy Oasis wrote:Did you use upholstery thread or something like that since it has to hold lost of weight?



Ha! You graciously over-estimate my sewing skills. Until this moment, I didn't even realize that something like upholstery thread even exists. I used the same generic unidentified thread  that I might use in any other sewing project.
 
Joy Oasis
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And it still holds whole body weight! Then maybe I am overcomplicating the whole thing...
 
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This is just a small thing, but I was really excited to give all of my children a pillow for Christmas this year made with the wool of my sheep. It is kind of like a Don't squeeze the Charmin. They are so comfortable and they are renewable for life.  You can always open them, re= fluff, clean, or add more wool to them. Now to make one for me. Some of my family doesn't sleep with pillows, but they are great to have for supporting the back when sitting and a thousand other reason it seems. ; )
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Joy Oasis wrote:And it still holds whole body weight! Then maybe I am overcomplicating the whole thing...



My hammock has held myself, a lady, and two kids. Perhaps 500 pounds. When I took the recent photo, I noticed a small rip in the fabric near the drawstring, so I mended it. It gets a lot of use.
 
Joy Oasis
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Great. Then I will be keeping my eyes open for some large pieces of the fabric.
 
Joy Oasis
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Liza Stallsmith wrote:This is just a small thing, but I was really excited to give all of my children a pillow for Christmas this year made with the wool of my sheep. It is kind of like a Don't squeeze the Charmin. They are so comfortable and they are renewable for life.  You can always open them, re= fluff, clean, or add more wool to them. Now to make one for me. Some of my family doesn't sleep with pillows, but they are great to have for supporting the back when sitting and a thousand other reason it seems. ; )



Liza, how do you make the pillows? I actually got a comforter with a wool inside, but it is so unbelievably heavy, that it is unpleasant to sleep under it, but it would work to sleep on it, so pillows must work great.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Joy Oasis wrote:Great. Then I will be keeping my eyes open for some large pieces of the fabric.



I got mine at the paint store. It was being sold as a drop-cloth. Much less expensive that way than at the fabric store.
 
Liza Stallsmith
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Joy Oasis, Sorry about not replying sooner. Everyone came home for Christmas and it became a blessed, busy, and confusing time.  I actually didn't make them. I didn't even know a wool pillow existed until I saw, felt, and hugged  one at a fiber show. I sent my wool to  http://www.zwool.com to have them made. Some of my friends were like why don't you make them. I believe that they could be made from wool batting, but knew that it would just be one more thing to get done for me. I tend to never see the end of the list that my family wants me to make them. lol Having someone else do it meant they would actually get it at Christmas! ( This Christmas not two or more yrs in the future. )

Sorry I wasn't much help on the how to end.
 
pollinator
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I have written up a review of my new buckwheat mattress
https://permies.com/t/84606/Open-Eyes-Bedding-DIY-Mattress#832743

So far, after 2 weeks, I'm loving it.
 
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Interesting stuff
 
pollinator
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There are a few sites out there (not affiliated with any of them) that have tutorial videos, sell materials, and help you decide (mostly with pros only) if sleeping on a wool pillow is right for you.

Apparently they compress 30% over the first 6 months. You can add more material, or fluff and restuff.

Depending on whether you are a side or back/stomach sleeper they suggested different firmness/thickness.


https://www.satarahome.com/pages/natural-pillows-is-a-wool-pillow-right-for-you


https://www.ceceswool.com/blog/time-to-make-the-pillows/





This is a company that sells felted wool locally sourced, ticking and pillow cases. They also made one or more of the videos.
https://www.diynaturalbedding.com
 
Joy Oasis
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Since I took a photo of the Irene's photo of her garden as my wall hanging, I thought I will share this photo here too, because you can see my hammock sleep setup - I have down comforter hanging underneath, and I also use down comforter on top and sheepskin inside of my hammock. Now I sleep very cozily.
 
Liza Stallsmith
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My pillows are made from batting which would hold is shape much longer and stay nicer then just loose wool. Each to his own way though.
 
pioneer
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We sleep on 4 layers of natural felt. My wife was uncomfortable with it at first, then she became ok with it. After waking up sore in a super cushy mattress at her parents place, she likes our set-up.
 
master steward
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Has anyone tried out Open Your Eyes Bedding?

Staff note (Joylynn Hardesty):

OOOH! Currently, PIE people get 15% off!

 
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Dan Boone wrote:I'd like to make a pitch here for a traditional solution: carefully chosen animal hides.

I grew up up sleeping on an unclipped, untanned (but well dried) caribou hide.  I had a "normal" mattress in the family cabin, but whenever we camped out wild (which was often, and includes a couple of five-month stints at mining camp) I was issued my caribou hide.  It had a distinctive but not unpleasant animal smell not unlike that of a clean dog (tanning would have prevented that) and was exceedingly warm and comfortable; plus, it was thick and cushy enough that even laid over a bed made from unpeeled poles, it was very comfy.  

Caribou of course are notorious for having thick hollow hair.  You might need a stack of cow hides (hair on) to get to the same comfort level.  However I've seen some sheep rugs (typically four tanned sheep backs sheared about an inch long and sewn together) that are every bit as thick and cushy as the caribou.  




Dan, thanks for this post. As a kid, my old man got us a "kaross" each which turns out to have many different meanings and I've never seen another one like it on the internet. It was a blanket made up of rabbit skins we were told, but they were brown, quite hairy and the underneath stitching was scratchy as hell. My old man lied a lot, so I am not sure whats what.

However, the top side of the kaross was very very soft and none of the hair fell out. Made me all nostalgic about it, when I recently started thinking about making a natural house/ bed/ furniture.


Are you in Canada? I am - and your thoughts inspired me to perhaps go on a Caribou hunt in the future. I'd have much to learn about permits and regulations here of course to do so.



Straw Pillow:


My pillow filled with straw is uncomfy due to the stiff stalks. I layered it inside 4 pillowcases, with some jean material and other well used t shirt material, and I like the firmness in one respect,but its still uncomfy.

I am allergic to grass and dust and used this as an additional tool to condition my body to learn that neither are poisons - so just relax! However, my reactions got so bad after 3-4 months of mindful persistence, that I stuck the whole thing in a washing machine a few times. I feel sorry for the machine - the water was like very liquidy brown cake batter in the beginning. I ran it several times till the water was clear and dried it out on the roof of my car in the sun (heat from above and the metal below as a refractory/ radiant source)


MOSS:

Has anyone ever dried out moss for a full sized mattress and used that to sleep on? I am wondering if this could be used to be an obviously natural, renewable mattress solution. One further benefit: the shape would not have to rectangular but anything your heart could dream up.
 
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I spent this morning reading this thread, then went out to weed and spread some wood chips on my paths. I like the cushion on a fresh laid path and it got me to wondering if it could work in combination with other natural materials in layers.
 
Michael Cox
pollinator
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:Has anyone tried out Open Your Eyes Bedding?



Yes, I recently made one of these beds and love it. My wife is less keen. We have compromised with a half and half bed. She has a normal memory foam mattress and I have buckwheat. It needs adjusting each evening before bed (60secs) but I sleep soundly and don’t wake in pain.

I posted a link to a review I did earlier in this thread.
 
pollinator
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I basically sleep on a plywood platform with a layer of Thai message mat and the thin layer of foam and a sleeping bag for a soft feel(its maybe 1 1/2" thick). I love it. Its like stretching all night :D
Ever since i spent time in Nepal for several months sleeping on a thin cotton made mattress which is about 1 inch thick, i have yet to go back to a normal bed. Often when i am at someones place for the night things like carpet rugs or some people have these 2 inch thick furry? carpet area rugs which are quite comfy.
Needless to say, i will not sleep in a "normal" mattress
This isnt my mattress though it gives you an idea of what i mean by thick furry area rug
Falmouth-Sapphire-Blue-Area-Rug.jpg
[Thumbnail for Falmouth-Sapphire-Blue-Area-Rug.jpg]
Example of thick furry rug which is comfy to sleep on for me
 
pollinator
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:Has anyone tried out Open Your Eyes Bedding?



Is the PIE discount still live? I'm wanting to make these mattresses for my family.
 
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