• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Bill Crim
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Greg Martin

hang your laundry to dry outside in the winter  RSS feed

 
Posts: 131
Location: Coastal temperate deciduous forest (Boston) - zone 6b - 44" rain/year
6
solar tiny house trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:I was reading something recently suggesting a clothes dryer from real goods.  I looked .... it looked really lame and really expensive. 

I've been using a clothes drying rack indoors and outdoors for a few years now that I got from ikea.  A quick search shows that they appear to not sell it anymore. 



In the summer we have a line outside. In rainy and cold times we use a large rack indoors that is Amish made. The basement doesn't smell good, so we dry in our living room now. 12 hours or so in winter when it's dry inside. Here is the rack, small and large sizes. I know we paid much less buying one locally. https://www.lehmans.com/product/premium-floor-clothes-dryers-large/  When they say solidly built, it's an understatement.

The Amish in Wisconsin, where we lived last, always dried laundry outdoors year 'round. A nice line on two pulleys enabled the women to hang laundry from the back porch, rotating the line until it was full. There are pictures and pulleys for sale here: https://www.skylineclotheslines.com/
 
Posts: 10
Location: NE Washington State
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For indoor drying I like to use what is commonly called a Sheila Maid in England. I like it because it hangs from the ceiling from pulleys so you can lower it to hang the laundry then hoist it up out of the way. Mine is in storage until the house is built and I haven't decided for sure where I'll put it - it's always been over the washer before but I may put it closer to the rocket mass heater in the new house. I found a website that sells them - https://columbuswashboard.com/collections/vintage-laundry/products/sheila-maid-airer - and they seem spendy but they do last a long, long time. My aunt had one in her house that had been there for 50+ years and was given to her by an elderly neighbor who'd probably had it at least as long. About the only thing that wears out is the rope.




 
Posts: 15
2
chicken food preservation homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't had a dryer for 8 years. I hang laundry on the clothesline all year round.  Winter time too. Water is one of the few substances that can go from a solid to a gas...this is why ice cubes shrink in the fridge. If it's snowing or raining,  I hang in the house. Usually on hangers..makes it easier. Nothing in the world smells as good as sheets dried on the winter clothesline. Once it warms up,  it is mostly dry.
 
pollinator
Posts: 188
Location: South of Capricorn
40
food preservation homestead rabbit
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
here we have an option similar to that Sheila Maid (which is super cute!) that people generally use in apartments, I have a larger version outside on my back porch. The clotheslines are attached to the ceiling and go up using pulleys or sometimes a retractable gadget, like this one.
 
Posts: 8
Location: 98612
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Grandma used to dry clothes in the basement during winters in Portland, OR; dried fine, but I don't know how long it took. I am planning to dry clothes in the loafing shed when I get a wash machine and am doing laundry in the winter. In the summer I hang my clothes outside but under the porch roof so as to limit sun exposure (for clothing longevity).
 
CAUTION! Do not touch the blades on your neck propeller while they are active. Tiny ad:
2019 PDC for Scientists, Engineers, Educators and experienced Permies
https://permies.com/wiki/100059/PDC-Scientists-Engineers-Educators-experienced
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!