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What are you planting in your zombie apocalypse-herb garden

 
pollinator
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Greetings and salutations.  What are the top five herbs you grow in your garden and what do you use them for.  

Do you use herbs primarily to eat, and for pollinators.  Is first-aid a consideration?


Basil
head colds, loss of appetite, gas
Plant 2 weeks after the last frost, warm weather annual

Echinacea: (coneflower)
Anxiety, blood pressure, inflammation, flu symptoms
Full to part sun, clumping perennial, 2 to three years for flowers, if planted from seed

Calendula:
antifungal, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial
Sow spring to early summer, full sun, short-lived perennial

Chamomile:
anxiety, stress, insomnia
Self-sowing annual, part shade

Dandelion
acne, eczema, heartburn, gastrointestinal disorders
Prefers full sun, perennial

Garlic
Antibiotic, lowers cholesterol,
Perennial, plant in full sun

Ginger
Nausea relief, pain relief, cold and flu symptoms, reduce inflammation
perennial, Grows in part to full shade,


Lavender
antiseptic, anti-inflammatory
Full-sun

Perennial, like, will come back year after year,  may die if cut to the ground.

Marshmallow
pain, inflammation, constipation, ulcers, urinary tract
Perennial, direct sunlight, moist soil

Oregano
Antibiotic, antioxidant, gut health, pain relief
Oregano grows as an annual in cold climates. Full to partial sun

Yarrow
Wound treatment, lower blood pressure, improve circulation
Perennial, Hot, dry conditions in full sun,

Lemon Balm
Stress relief, anxiety, indigestion, nausea
Perennial, Full sun to part shade, will grow in most soils

Meadowsweet
Colds, bronchitis, heartburn,
Perennial, full sun

Motherwort
Anxiety, gas,
Perennial, sun to part shade, moist soil

Peppermint
Digestion, tension, headaches, sinuses, energy, bacterial infections
Perennial, light full sun to part shade

Passion Flower
Insomnia, anxiety, pain, inflammation, burns
Full sun to part shade, perennial if it makes it through winter, may come back from roots

Stinging Nettles
Inflammation, hay fever, blood sugar control,
Moist, full sun to partial shade, perennial

St. John’s Wort
Depression, appetite, nervousness
Perennial, full sun to part shade,

Thyme
Stomach ache, arthritis, sore throat
Perennial, full sun,

Valerian
Sleep and anxiety, antioxidant
Perennial, light shade to full sun
IMG_9322.JPG
Echinacea and Yarrow from last summer
Echinacea and Yarrow from last summer
 
pollinator
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I grow Rosemary, thyme, parsley, cilantro, oregano and basil to use in food.  Garlic because we love it.  Chamomile, peppermint, and spearmint mostly for tea, lavender and calendula as flowers and companion plants.  I plan to plant Yarrow and Echinacea this year, and maybe marshmallow.  
Thank you for this post, I enjoyed learning about the herbs.
 
pollinator
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All I have is the
1. mint/thyme family
2. garlic/onion family
3. carrot/lovage family

I need to branch out

 
pollinator
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I grow a lot of herbs and I am looking to add more.  At this point I grown them either for cooking or for beneficial insects.

Lovage
Garlic
Bunching onions
Chives
Garlic Chives
Thyme
Lemon Thyme
Sage
Savory
Rosemary
Oregano
Parsley
Basil
Dill
Pineapple Sage
Bee Balm
Cone Flower
Feverfew
Catnip
Several kinds of mint if my husband hasn't killed them
Borage
Calendula
Yarrow grows wild in my yard.





 
Scott Foster
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Jen Fulkerson wrote:I grow Rosemary, thyme, parsley, cilantro, oregano and basil to use in food.  Garlic because we love it.  Chamomile, peppermint, and spearmint mostly for tea, lavender, and calendula as flowers and companion plants.  I plan to plant Yarrow and Echinacea this year, and maybe marshmallow.  
Thank you for this post, I enjoyed learning about the herbs.



Quite a collection Jen!  I started way too much Yarrow last winter and planted it out.  I love it.   It is vigorous.  My favorite is the Polish mix I got from Baker Creek seeds.  I planted a ton of Echinacea too but I planted most of it from seeds so I haven't seen blooms from those plants.

I focusing on English Lavender this year.  I have a disease where I have to start every seed in the packet. :-)


 
Scott Foster
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S Bengi wrote:All I have is the
1. mint/thyme family
2. garlic/onion family
3. carrot/lovage family

I need to branch out



It's a good start.  The more you plant the more pollinators you will have.  When I planted Yarrow, beneficial micro-wasps and bees when way up.
 
Scott Foster
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Kate Muller wrote:I grow a lot of herbs and I am looking to add more.  At this point, I grown them either for cooking or for beneficial insects.




Kate, you have quite the collection.   You're lucky you have wild Yarrow!  If your mint got mowed I hope it pops back up, I have a feeling it will.  Mint spreads like wildfire.

Cheers, Scott
 
pollinator
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Ooh so I deliberately grow some herbs including babying some through the winter inside, but there are many more that just grow around the place where ever they wish to really and quite often exactly where I don't wish them to be!
The only one i ever use medicinally is Pot marigold if something needs disinfecting.

Kept inside in winter (some in the barn lemongrass in the house)

Bay
Rosemary
Thyme
Lemon grass
French Taragon
Sage

Outside planted

Parsley
Chamomile
Angelica
Lovage
Marjoram
Chives
Mint
Coriander
Dill
Fennel
Horseradish
Salad Burnet
Red/black currents
Raspberries
Garlic
Pot marigold

Plants that grow wild on our land with medicinal uses

Dandelion
Feverfew
Groundsel
Lesser celandine
Foxglove
Sphagnum moss
Willow
Elder
Hawthorn
Daisy
Silver weed
cinqufoil
Tansy
Wormwood
Wood and water avons
Nettles
Ground elder
meadow sweet
Ladies bedstraw
St johns wort
Yarrow
mullein
dock

and probably many more I can't think of off the top of my head.
 
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Last year, I had:

Lemon Balm: calming effect
Echinacea coneflower
Garlic Chives
Lavender
Rosemary: mouth wash
Egyption Walking Onions

Blue Sage, Autumn Sage and Turks Cap (mallow) for pollinator.
 
Kate Muller
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Scott Foster wrote:

Kate Muller wrote:I grow a lot of herbs and I am looking to add more.  At this point, I grown them either for cooking or for beneficial insects.




Kate, you have quite the collection.   You're lucky you have wild Yarrow!  If your mint got mowed I hope it pops back up, I have a feeling it will.  Mint spreads like wildfire.

Cheers, Scott



The dear husband didn't mow over the mint he buried it while expanding our natural swimming pond.  I was my fault for planting it before the pond was completely finished.  I will replant this spring.  Ironically my last cat killed all my mint plants.  I have had a difficult time keeping any mint plants alive more than a year or two.  It is running joke that I can grow just about anything except mint.

I forgot about the beneficial volunteers  in the yard like mullen, dandelions, dock, sheep sorrel, clover, and other plants I only remove if they are in a really bad location.  

 
Scott Foster
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Skandi Rogers wrote:Ooh so I deliberately grow some herbs including babying some through the winter inside, but there are many more that just grow around the place where ever they wish to really and quite often exactly where I don't wish them to be!
The only one i ever use medicinally is Pot marigold if something needs disinfecting.

Kept inside in winter (some in the barn lemongrass in the house)




Quite the list Skandi, I'll be stealing some of these for my list.  

P.S. I didn't consider moss as an herb.   I will check it out.

Regards, Scott
 
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Top Five Herbs that I use:

Parsley -- blood clotting. Really helped me stop bleeding after giving birth, and helped my husband after he had fistula surgery. It is the highest source of vitamin K. And it's tasty in food, too!

Garlic -- antibacterial/antifungal. Tasty in food!

Chives-- we munch on these outside, and use them in most every dish that calls for onions. I can't ever seem to grow enough. I love that they are present most of the year, too!

Mint -- anti-inflammatory, good for autoimmune conditions and gut problems. Also good for respiratory ailments. Makes a nice tea.

Oregano (also thyme and rosemary) -- I don't use these medicianlly, nut we use them a lot in cooking!
 
pollinator
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Sweet Marjoram-fear,stress,sadness,tension,high bloodpressure
Evening primrose is growing here, i try to get it to grow in other places.
Watercress, i gotto say i try it again this year, but i prefer land-cress, because of the problem with liver-flukes in watercress.
Lemon balm, is popping up everywhere.
Common mallow, is pretty easy and beautiful.
Flax, gonna try to plant a bit in the fields.
Hyssop, is very good for colds and perrenial, making mini hedge rows with them.
Hops, the flower cone are great to make a tincture with for sleep disorders.
Fennel, is great in salads too and good for stomach.
Arnica, i'm trying it out now, to see if i can get that going this year.
Aloe vera inside, good to hydrate hands.
 
Scott Foster
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Top Five Herbs that I use:

!



Good List: thanks!  I didn't know parsley had so many medicinal qualities.
 
Scott Foster
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Hugo Morvan wrote:
Hyssop, is very good for colds and perennial, making mini hedgerows with them.
Hops, the flower cone is great to make a tincture with for sleep disorders.
Fennel is great in salads too and good for the stomach.
Arnica, I'm trying it out now, to see if I can get that going this year.




I'll look into Arnica, never heard of it.  Good list.  Thanks for the input.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Good luck Scott  I have good luck with lavender I buy, One poor plant was on the side of my hugelkultur, and the chickens removed all the soil down to the wood and that little lavender plant is laying there with soil on the root ball, and one little root hanging on and not only is it alive but blooming. (I did put soil around it)  When it comes to seed I can't seem to get them to germinate.  I have tried twice this year with no success.  I think I will try to put the seeds between a damp paper towel on the refrigerator and see if I can get them to germinate that way. Time will tell. I like your post it's fun.
 
Scott Foster
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Jen Fulkerson wrote:Good luck Scott  I have good luck with lavender I buy, One poor plant was on the side of my hugelkultur, and the chickens removed all the soil down to the wood and that little lavender plant is laying there with soil on the root ball, and one little root hanging on and not only is it alive but blooming. (I did put soil around it)  When it comes to seed I can't seem to get them to germinate.  I have tried twice this year with no success.  I think I will try to put the seeds between a damp paper towel on the refrigerator and see if I can get them to germinate that way. Time will tell. I like your post it's fun.



Thanks Jen.    I put an entire pack of seeds in an egg carton and wrapped it with handy wrap.  I haven't go sprouts yet.  Besides apple seeds, it's the only thing not sprouting:.:(  Maybe I need a heating pad,  I don't have one...


IMG_4911.JPG
Sleeping Lavender
Sleeping Lavender
 
Hugo Morvan
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I noticed some` herbs don't give viable seed. Hyssop, lavender, rosemary, dill. When i had plants from the nursery that is. When i started hyssop from seed last year it flowered and provided seed which i've tried immediately and it resulted in lots of nice plants. I've started lavender from seed last year after failed propagation attempts involving cuttings and seeds. They weren't as fast growing as the hyssop, but i expect them to flower this year. I've planted them close together so i hope they will cross pollinate and deliver new lavenders which will provide viable seed again. Rosemary is easy to get cuttings from, but i use a lot of it. Started seeds this year and will plant them together, will probably take two years to get viable seeds, but it's still worth the effort. Dill was hard to find as well, but three years ago i bumped into some good seeds at a seed exchange.
I make hedges with herbs in my veggie beds. Thyme is easiest to propagate.

https://permies.com/t/124338/Thyme-propagation-technique-mini-hedges
 
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