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What's your favorite native/wild fruit to harvest and eat?

 
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Commonly found wild foods and medicine plants in our woods are blackberries, raspberries, wild strawberries, apples (from a long lost 150+ year old farm), pine needle tea, nettles, willow bark and more. Of course, can't forget dandelions and cattails ...
 
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persimmons and jam from sweetened crabapples if tart
 
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Location: Southwestern NM
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Here in the high desert, it's cholla buds in the spring and tuna (prickly pear fruit) in the fall. Also, pinones (aka pine nuts).  Tons of juniper around here but I've never yet tried the berries.
 
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We have a volunteer plum tree with a small, dark red fruit which is awesome fresh or made into jam or ketchup. It might not count as it's likely close to a domestic plant genetically speaking. There's also a mushroom locally that I can safely identify. It's great dried and then crushed into soups.
 
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My favorites are Black Raspberries, Choke cherries, wild grapes, and ground cherries. The thorns from collecting black raspberries are painful but worth the harvest. Choke cherries are sour but make a fantastic jelly. Wild grapes are great too. I've found some plants that have excellent flavor. Ground cherries are also very delicious for making salsas. They're a bit sweeter than tomatillos. I also like to leave some berries on the plants and let them over winter. Once they do the berries become almost jel-like and have an incredibly fruity, sweet taste. It's like a mix of strawberry, pineapple, and other fruits all though in one little berry.  Simply amazing! :)
 
pollinator
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Skandi Rogers wrote:We don't get too many fruits that are worth picking really

Cloudberries are lovely but way to rare to pick, they should be photographed and left alone.



You might try propagating a plant or two so that you can have your own.  You need not pick the berries but layering or other relatively non-invasive techniques might work.    My economics professor once pointed out that the entire reason that whales are endangered and chickens are not all revolved around ownership of the animal in question.  None of us own a whale so as the saying goes when it's no one's it's everyone's so people still hunt whales.  However, if someone came into your yard to hunt your chickens, they're your property and you have legal recourse against the hunter of chickens as well as rights to protect them as your property.  

If you have your own, you can always "rewild" a portion of the offspring.  

I forgot to add pricky pear cactus pears - OMG the syrup and jam you can make with them.  Its absolutely worth the thorns - just as much as the blackberries.  (I used to get into trouble for stopping on the way home from school in the blackberry bramble - school clothes torn and purple from eating my way through the bramble)  Pick with tongs, into a bucket and get fire or torch to burn the spines off.  Peel and enjoy.  
 
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Huckelberrys!
 
Something must be done about this. Let's start by reading this tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/wiki/190487/permaculture-projects/Work-Trade-Garden-Master
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