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What's your favorite native/wild fruit to harvest and eat?

 
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Commonly found wild foods and medicine plants in our woods are blackberries, raspberries, wild strawberries, apples (from a long lost 150+ year old farm), pine needle tea, nettles, willow bark and more. Of course, can't forget dandelions and cattails ...
 
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persimmons and jam from sweetened crabapples if tart
 
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Here in the high desert, it's cholla buds in the spring and tuna (prickly pear fruit) in the fall. Also, pinones (aka pine nuts).  Tons of juniper around here but I've never yet tried the berries.
 
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We have a volunteer plum tree with a small, dark red fruit which is awesome fresh or made into jam or ketchup. It might not count as it's likely close to a domestic plant genetically speaking. There's also a mushroom locally that I can safely identify. It's great dried and then crushed into soups.
 
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