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the most eco and last coffee maker - cowgirl coffee

 
pollinator
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that's the thing! made of flannel. you could conceivably use any fabric, maybe even flax you made yourself. wire and fabric, lasts forever (as long as you don't let it get moldy- they are really easy to clean out if the water is drained).
 
steward
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Here is a thing that filters coffee with just stainless steel:


I found it here, on amazon.

The instructions are to heat water to 200 degrees (or let it cool a bit after coming to a boil) then pour a little water over the ground coffee in the filter to "bloom" it, wait half a minute, then pour the rest of the water over in a circular motion.  People say the coffee thus brewed is delicious, and it goes right into your mug (or you could fill a thermos or a pot, as it can make more than one cup).

Pour-over coffee is all the rage in Portland these days.

Personally, I'm using a manual espresso machine, where I'm literally pulling a shot with a heavy lever.  That too, is all made of stainless steel, but we had to look hard to find a good used one on Ebay that didn't break the bank.
 
master steward
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This is actually my husband's favorite way to make coffee, and he's been brewing it this way since I first told him about this thread, years ago. He's given away all his coffee makers and just happily uses a pot.

Yesterday, as he was brewing his coffee, he made this video:



Waiting for the coffee to erupt is one of his--and my kids'--favorite things to do
 
pollinator
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paul wheaton wrote:First I have to confess that I am coffee's bitch. When I was 18 I went to the doctor because of hundreds of blisters all over my hands.  He said "you drink a lot of coffee, don't you?"  Yes, about three pots a day.   Plus mountain dew.

Duke, did the doc explain exactly how caffeine caused the blisters? I remember the days of chasing down my coffee with lipovitan, red bull, jolt or coca cola.

One time when my french press broke, I switched over to something similar.  I put the coffee and hot water in a glass measuring cup:

Not as sturdy but any carafe from old drip machines are good too - available dirt-cheap at most flea markets and garage sales; or free in most attics, basements and deep dark cupboards. I start with boiling water and leave the grounds steeping indefinitely, and strain them out only when i pour into my mug (then nuke to ideal temp - 45 seconds on high). Most other coffee folks cringe at the thought of 'over-extracted' but i think their chemexes and harios make bland, insipid coffee.

I've eliminated caffeine from my diet many times in my life, and those were really unproductive years.  So now, I have exactly one cup of coffee each morning and no more.

Horrific years! how many ounces is your daily morning mug now? I must confess I still consume 48 ounces daily (4 12oz servings), sometimes more.
 
master steward
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pusang halaw wrote:Duke, did the doc explain exactly how caffeine caused the blisters?



nope.


how many ounces is your daily morning mug now?



I am going to guess:  18 fluid ounces.

 
pollinator
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We got rid of coffee machines in 2001 or 2002 and simply use a pan.

Once the water boils, it is taken off the heat and custom sized coffee grounds poured right in. A stir and while the mix is still whirling we set the pot on a log cut for holding the pan at a tilt.

Some observations.

Purified water or the best spring water only.

The combination of whirl and the low corner of the pot work together to help gravity sort stuff out.
Blowing over the top of the floating grounds releases them from the foamy surface mixture. I do this in the direction of spin.

Coffee is temp sensitive, too hot and it vaporizes the good stuff, too cold and you dont get much either. Steep with the lid on after a moment to flash off some.

Decant gently.

Getting groundless coffee without a strainer requires that the water is hot enough to expunge air from properly sized grounds, agitation to remove air bubbles clinging to grounds, and patience, dont be hasty or you will get the grounds too!
 
pusang halaw
pollinator
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frank li wrote:We got rid of coffee machines in 2001 or 2002 and simply use a pan. Once the water boils, it is taken off the heat and custom sized coffee grounds poured right in. A stir and while the mix is still whirling we set the pot on a log cut for holding the pan at a tilt... The combination of whirl and the low corner of the pot work together to help gravity sort stuff out

Are you tilting the pan to improve extraction or to let the grounds settle? because the time it takes for the water to go from a boiling 100ºC (212ºF) down to a drinkable 70º-80ºC (155º-175ºF) is long enough for a medium-fine grind to steep and release it's goodness. Stir right before pouring thru your favorite filter. Same time, temp, and grind size for french presses. Course grinds will withstand higher temps and longer steeps; and is ideal too for moka pot brewing.

Coffee is temp sensitive, too hot and it vaporizes the good stuff, too cold and you dont get much either. Steep with the lid on after a moment to flash off some.

If you have time (and are willing to make ahead), a long steep like cold brewing will extract the good stuff from medium to fine grinds. But someone already pointed out that's a bit of a misnomer because most "cold brew" is started with room temp or anywhere between 10 degrees above or below body temp (37°C or 98.6°F) water, it's the long steep that's cold.
 
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