I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
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- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
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Canning after the Apocalypse!  RSS feed

 
Rory Rivers
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Alright, I try not to think about the end of the world too much, but when it's the middle of January and you're eating the last of the tomatoes you put put up in August, it's hard not to wonder "what would I do if I couldn't just go to the store after this."

Well, if the End of the World came, I wouldn't have to go to my job (yes!), and I could spend a lot more time on my tomatoes in the Summer (YES!!), but eventually I would run out of lids... THE LIDS!!! They're not reusable (at least not indefinitely so... I do admit to reusing them once if the still look good and I've never lost a seal...).

So what do you do? Can your rejuvenate lids with wax? Would you use the reusable taddler lids? How many seasons do they have in them? I imagine they would crack eventually. Perhaps canning is just a lost technology in the Next World. Thoughts?
 
Robert Ray
gardener
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Have just started using Tattler lids so my experience is limited with them. I do dehydrate quite a bit. I even used strawberries in my oatmeal this morning. Currently use a large dehydrator from Cabela's but will eventually complete a solar powered one.
 
Cris Bessette
gardener
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Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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I have an irrational fear of canning, at least of ME doing it. The last few times I tried canning some things, I screwed up half of it- lids loose- too much air, etc.

Anymore for long term storage I dehydrate.
 
Ken Peavey
steward
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Location: FL
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In such a scenario, lids would be a finite resource. Getting the most out of what remained would be the rule of thumb. Using the lids of quarts would be better than using them on pints. Using them on expensive crops, such as meat, would be better than inexpensive crops, such as spinach. When new lids are not available, risking reuse on a precious commodity would not be worth it to some. The fall back for food preservation would be pickling, smoking, and dehydration. Employing used lids for storing dried goods is an option, and one which reuses the lids until they corrode to unsatisfactory condition. An airtight seal is not required, just keep the bugs out. As the lid supply dwindles, the ability to produce food continually and with minimal effort would be a primary concern. Canning can offer a bridge for storage solutions while you make the transition to complete self sufficiency and dehydrated food preservation. If maintaining the ability to preserve foods by canning is something you depend on, then acquiring and storing a large number of lids while they are cheap would be advisable.

An apocalypse scenario would be a greater shock to those who have not internalized homesteading skills and do not have a self sufficient lifestyle.

 
R Scott
Posts: 3363
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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We bought a LOT of tattlers when they had some REALLY good deals when they were just getting back into the market. We will run out of jars and rings first. Jars break, and they take a lot of space to store. Rings are not made well and corrode very easily these days. I really want a source for better rings, either stainless or at least better plating.

 
Robert Ray
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I don't have a real root cellar and would really like one. My other half has asked for me to build her a new studio and one of the things she suggested is to build a root cellar underneath it. Thaw baby thaw I'm ready.
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Tattler lids pretty much have that problem solved.

I have LOTS of them, and use them exclusively. They're the real deal. They don't crack, and given reasonable proper care they are pretty much indefinitely reusable. The weakest link in the chain is the rubber rings (which will dry out EVENTUALLY), but those can be purchased on their own, and there are ways to store them that would extend their shelf life.

With proper care your rings should last a long, long time, and you only really need as many as you can process at one time (remove them after cooling).

 
Jess Dee
Posts: 19
Location: Saskatchewan zone 2
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I actually have a collection of the very old-style glass lids that are designed to work similarly to the Tattlers. However, I haven't had a chance to experiment with them yet (I need a low-value surplus crop to try that on), and I've heard they are a lot more finicky than even Tattler lids. I found the glass lids at garage sales and in Granny's basement; I think you need a taller ring to use them with, though, and I have a few, but I'm not sure if they make them anymore.
 
Chris Fox
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How many jars to can in a year? Will that increase or decrease in the future, family getting bigger or smaller? How many more years will you can in your life? Add that all up and buy in bulk. They are small and store dang near forever.
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
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Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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More sauerkraut / kimchi style of preserving. That is more low tech.
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Angelika Maier wrote:More sauerkraut / kimchi style of preserving. That is more low tech.


Fermentation is rad, but having the jars and lids gives you options. It's relatively easy to vacuum-can dried foods in mason jars, making them essentially pest-proof for longer-term storage. That ability alone is worth the price of admission, IMHO.
 
Ken Peavey
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I'll be giving those Tattler's a try.
 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 132
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
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dehydrate the tomatoes
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 6039
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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chrissy bauman wrote:dehydrate the tomatoes


Yes, dried tomatoes are delicious. I've been canning less and dehydrating more...shiitakes, green beans, fruit. Working towards a solar dryer. I do intend to get some Tattler lids though as I have lots of canning jars and haven't given it up completely. Would everyone be canning on wood fires...I find canning uses a lot of energy. I cook on gas during canning season now but used to cook and can year round on a wood cookstove...that's a pretty hot job summertime though.
 
Jess Dee
Posts: 19
Location: Saskatchewan zone 2
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Judith Browning wrote:
chrissy bauman wrote:dehydrate the tomatoes


Would everyone be canning on wood fires...I find canning uses a lot of energy. I cook on gas during canning season now but used to cook and can year round on a wood cookstove...that's a pretty hot job summertime though.


I think that's why there were summer kitchens. If I had to cook with wood year round, I would definitely be looking into a summer kitchen.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 6039
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Hi, Jess, we carried a small wood cook stove outside during the summer for years but 100 degree plus days are just hot no matter where you are...even early morning or late evening, but I did it for a long time. With the long hot and dry summers we have been having here i think solar dehydration is the way to go...it is calling to me...quit sweating over the fire....
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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I am going to build a rocket stove (not mass heater) for summer canning.
 
Jess Dee
Posts: 19
Location: Saskatchewan zone 2
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Judith Browning wrote:Hi, Jess, we carried a small wood cook stove outside during the summer for years but 100 degree plus days are just hot no matter where you are...even early morning or late evening, but I did it for a long time. With the long hot and dry summers we have been having here i think solar dehydration is the way to go...it is calling to me...quit sweating over the fire....


Yeah, I don't blame you. We do fairly minimal canning here; we freeze a lot of things because we like the consistency better, and rely heavily on the root cellar for a lot of our storage also. We're mostly into jams, which I can time for fairly early (strawberries and rhubarb) or late (raspberries and blueberries), and avoid the worst of the summer heat. Post apocalypse, I think we'd be relying even more heavily on the root cellar and dried goods like beans and grain, with the occasional canned thing like jam or preserves as a treat or flavoring (like in jam cookies, or pickles, or salsa), rather than trying to maintain the exact same diet as we have right now (though we've been transitioning to a much more local and seasonal diet over the years, too, so it wouldn't be that big a stretch anymore). Dehydrating is definitely more appropriate in the summer heat, that's for sure!
 
Power corrupts. Absolute power xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx is kinda neat.
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
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