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What kind of weaving technique is this?

 
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I am learning to craft with natural materials and I really like these bags:
One is with hyacinth stalk and the other one labeled "bamboo".
Does any one know the name of this kind of bags and how to weave? A link to youtube video would be very helpful.  Thanks!
Screenshot_20231107_215048_Chrome.jpg
Water hyacinth bag
Water hyacinth bag
Screenshot_20231123_032917_Chrome.jpg
Bamboo bag
Bamboo bag
 
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twining basketry might be the style.

Looks like two rows are worked at once with an opposite twist to create that knitted look.
 
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r ranson wrote:twining basketry might be the style.

Is that sort of the same way they fold straw to make straw hats?
 
May Lotito
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For the second one, the vertical rows coming from the handle look like crochet chains crossing the horizontal rows. Does that mean the horizontal ones come first?
 
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Both baskets look like crochet to me.

The first one was easy to find an example:


 
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I wonder whether that second bags is some sort of rattan technique?


source

I've never had a go at it, but it looks somewhat similar.
 
May Lotito
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I did part of it with some shower curtain rings using twining weave like Raven said. It's too messy to continue with these chayote vines. But I am wondering It's done this way.
20231123_114954.jpg
Fake crochet look
Fake crochet look
20231123_115031.jpg
Plan
Plan
 
May Lotito
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Anne Miller wrote:Both baskets look like crochet to me.



They surely are easy to make by crocheting, knitting or even sewing. Just replace the rectangle shape with trapezoid.
 
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Here's an example of making patterns with twining

https://permies.com/t/211707/rag-rugs#1828474
 
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To me, the second picture looks almost like a Choctaw elbow basket. A quick google shows all kinds of patterns on offer for under $5! Although, I do also like to reverse engineer designs. Looking forward to seeing your results.
 
Jay Angler
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I don't want to totally hijack this post, but I do want to interject the importance of not only beauty, but also function. Smallish, round handles such as are on May's first examples are very uncomfortable for my hands to carry. More comfortable than a plastic shopping bag that totally collapses and squishes my fingers, but still not something I'd use by choice.



The bottom middle picture, which seems to be called a "D" handle, although it's missing the rounded part of the "D", is far more comfortable to carry with any weight for any distance. If you end up wanting to carry it at your bent elbow, that style handle may allow you to do so by carrying the basket just a little off center.

If people want to discuss more about the ergonomics of handles/baskets, I'll start a thread and post a link here.
 
May Lotito
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Hi Jay, a thread discussing the ergonomic of handles will be great!

I also found the rigid round handle uncomfortable to carry. I made this bag and used it a couple times it kept sliding off my shoulder! For baskets, I find wether the handles are swinging or not makes a difference too.
P9045992-(2).JPG
Bag with bamboo handle
Bag with bamboo handle
 
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The first one reminds me of some seagrass baskets I have seen from S.C.
 
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May Lotito wrote:I also found the rigid round handle uncomfortable to carry. I made this bag and used it a couple times it kept sliding off my shoulder! For baskets, I find whether the handles are swinging or not makes a difference too.

Wow - yes, bamboo is pretty slippery. That handle might be OK for a bag carried by the hand. I suspect if the bag was carried on the bent arm, it wouldn't distribute the weight quite widely enough either.

I started a thread here: https://permies.com/t/234715/sort-handle-comfortable-basket-bag
 
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If you copy and paste these images into Photoshop or any good image editing program and zoom in there is no obvious weave to either bag. They both appear to be crocheted. with the second bag they appeared to crochet around a twisted "rope" of the material.

 
May Lotito
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The first bag can be done with weaving, though it is not thd mostly easy way to do and have multiple loose ends to deal with.

I did another sample with strips of double knit fabric. The end strips are for the weaver to turn around while each pair of strips in the middle twine around each other. Alternate the direction of twining to get the stockinette look.
I added two strips after 5 rows to increase the width (Blue dots). In the picture of the bag, a lot more of strips are added in a pattern.

I don't know how to join front and back yet. Maybe the ends can be joined and the warps and wefts be switched. Add two more stripes to fill the gap that turns into the sides and bottom.
20231201_081316.jpg
Sample #2
Sample #2
Screenshot_20231107_215048_Chrome.jpg
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