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new idea for podcasts - the Sunday walk  RSS feed

 
master steward
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Paul is managing the "empire" and the project here from his computer, 12 hours per day, 6 to 7 days per week. It's important work to be sure.

And Paul has over 200 gorgeous acres to enjoy and learn about.



He wants to take Sundays off. (Though as I type this, on a Sunday, he is working at the desk next to mine.) I want to walk more. And I want us both to get out on the laboratory more.

So Paul agreed that if we do walking podcasts, as we have done a few times in the past, he will walk the lab with me each Sunday.

Before Paul owned land, we had the podcast topic request thread, and many good podcasts were created with questions from there. Circumstances are far different now - in many good ways.



What do you want to hear about on our Sunday walks?

Staff note (Jocelyn Campbell):

Our first two "Sunday Walk" podcasts were recorded and published in early 2014. Podcast 273 - Earthworks DVD Set Podcast 274 - Earthworks DVD Set Part2

 
master steward
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I am willing to go out if we can have some questions or topics that we have not already covered in past podcasts. So I hope the people that reply to this thread are people that have already listened to all of the podcasts.


 
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#1.Talk to Dr. Mercola, the #1 natural health site on the web. He is just getting fascinated with growing your own food, probiotics, how can we grow higher quality food that's healthier without destroying the environment.

#2 Talk to Peter McCoy who runs Radical Mycology. He runs workshops for people to learn how to grow mushrooms, in involved in mycorestoration, and runs a radical mycology in which they try to encourage people to use grass roots, hands on low tech methods to get a lot of people to include mushrooms in their lives.

#3 talk to Jenny Pell about the Seattle FOod forest, how it's going, and how they're going to manage it when it's done.
Thanks
John S
PDX OR
 
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A lot of small conventional farmers seem to recoil at the thought of permaculture because they can't see a way to grow their traditional row crops in polycultures. Is it possible to do row crops while still following the three ethics and twelve design principles? If so, can you talk about some examples you've seen?
 
Mother Tree
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If you're walking around the land, I'd like to be able to imagine what it's like there and what plants and animals and things you see as you're walking around, and how they all interact. And what you learn about the land itself as you walk and talk. Give us a feel for what it's actually like there. I'll probably never be able to visit, but if you did that, and maybe take a few photos of the places and things that you mention, we could have a thread to look at as we listen to the podcast.
 
paul wheaton
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John Saltveit wrote:#1.Talk to Dr. Mercola, the #1 natural health site on the web. He is just getting fascinated with growing your own food, probiotics, how can we grow higher quality food that's healthier without destroying the environment.

#2 Talk to Peter McCoy who runs Radical Mycology. He runs workshops for people to learn how to grow mushrooms, in involved in mycorestoration, and runs a radical mycology in which they try to encourage people to use grass roots, hands on low tech methods to get a lot of people to include mushrooms in their lives.

#3 talk to Jenny Pell about the Seattle FOod forest, how it's going, and how they're going to manage it when it's done.
Thanks
John S
PDX OR



How do we talk to people while recording a podcast in a place that has no internet and pretty crappy cell reception?
 
steward
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I would like to hear more about plans for planting at the laboratory. I see a lot of building, and RMH innovation, and there's animal husbandry, and I know Paul is flinging apple cores on a regular basis, but are there any ongoing or planned horticultural projects?
 
the navigator
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I'd like to hear more about the elevator talk. I think you briefly have discussed it in the past, but I feel it's important.

Bill Kearns created the thread back in may 2011: http://www.permies.com/t/8418/permaculture-design/permaculture-Elevator-Speech#174339

What do you say?

It's difficult enough to get intelligent people find it plausible that permaculture is the solution to all the problems in the world if you've got an hour. What when you've got 3 minutes? Or 30 seconds? Or less?

For pod people it could be useful on dates as well. It seems dates tend to find it uhm, intriguing, that you're saving the world.
 
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Yesterday Tony and I took a walk on the laboratory and observed the dry creek bed. We wondered how you were going to revive it. As I had been reading the Designer's Manual yesterday I was learning about the value of observation. Maybe you could discuss ideas about what people do the first year when they buy raw land? Where do you start? How do you prioritize?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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paul wheaton wrote:

How do we talk to people while recording a podcast in a place that has no internet and pretty crappy cell reception?



Interviews also take time to connect, prepare for, and coordinate. Hearing great minds discuss or debate something is cool, but we're not quite at the level where we can branch out like that (all our plates are too full!) even if we had reception at the lab.
 
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I was hoping that you could discuss the different possibilities of permaculture installations specifically in the urban environments with varying amounts of maintenance. I am thinking about the elderly that may have a lot of time, but not the strength and/or energy to do much with their property. Also the very busy people that may have the strength and energy, but not the time to work much on a system. I can see these being installed as a business, or simply by friends or family. Is it simply a fantasy to want to put in extremely low, or no maintenance systems in small areas that are still reasonably productive?
 
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Burra Maluca wrote:If you're walking around the land, I'd like to be able to imagine what it's like there and what plants and animals and things you see as you're walking around, and how they all interact. And what you learn about the land itself as you walk and talk. Give us a feel for what it's actually like there. I'll probably never be able to visit, but if you did that, and maybe take a few photos of the places and things that you mention, we could have a thread to look at as we listen to the podcast.



And...

Emily Aaston wrote:Yesterday Tony and I took a walk on the laboratory and observed the dry creek bed. We wondered how you were going to revive it. As I had been reading the Designer's Manual yesterday I was learning about the value of observation. Maybe you could discuss ideas about what people do the first year when they buy raw land? Where do you start? How do you prioritize?



I love this idea - kind of a "design walkabout" - spit-balling out loud on some of the elements, functions and interactions you see and possible ideas for combining them. I think this would be really intriguing to a lot of people AND you would have a record of how you developed this land, possibly for a book or manual in the future.
 
gardener
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I've thought of this a few times now so I'm gonna go ahead and post it. Diatomaceous earth... I want to hear more about it. The latest and greatest findings. Especially more about humans taking it internally, & any findings on parasites and longevity.
 
Jesse Biggs
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Since I already "went there", I would also like to hear more about b-12 deficiency and how it is made in the gut and not really "getable" through the diet.
 
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I think I've listened to all your podcasts. There's one thing I don't get with permaculture. How do annuals work? I know some plants selfseed but that is not a sure thing, right? How would people get all their food from permaculture? There are not enough perennials in the northern climates to provide everything people eat. I drive past monoculture fields of berries and corn and wheat. But how would enough of this food be produced for all the people in a permaculture based society?
 
paul wheaton
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we tried. Where at the hospital now. Jocelyn may have broken her arm. The ice was so pretty she needed to take a picture.
Staff note (Jocelyn Campbell):

The podcast in which I slip and fall (at the end); such a simple little fall, that it seems incredible that anything was broken: Podcast 273 Earthworks DVD Set.

 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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paul wheaton wrote:Where at the hospital now. Jocelyn may have broken her arm. The ice was so pretty she needed to take a picture.



Wow - keep us updated and sending healing vibes Joecelyn's way! Talk about "suffering for one's art...!"
 
paul wheaton
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It is a broken arm. They need to reset stuff, so they are gonna put her under.
 
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Sorry to hear about the fracture.
I pray she has a speedy recovery.

I am glad to hear you will be responding to questions.
I find that a well thought out podcast is worth so much more than one that is not.

#1
I would like to hear more about the practice of planting nitrogen fixating trees at a ratio of 7 (Jack Spirko) or 9 (Jeff Lawton) to one food producing perennial.
Have you done this?
How did it work?
It sounds like I'll be spending my life with a chain saw trying to keep these things trimmed back.
I don't like chain saws and in my dessert climate, branches don't break down if they are chopped and dropped.
What has your experience been?

#2. Have you eaten Siberian pea tree pods?
Were they edible

#3
What ways do you save the annuals to use throughout the year?
If you have extra broccoli or cauliflower, do you freeze it and use it later in soup?
Do you can any of your annuals?
I know people who can their tomatoes, but (for example) have never heard of people saving their pea pods to use throughout the year.

 
Jesse Biggs
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paul wheaton wrote:It is a broken arm. They need to reset stuff, so they are gonna put her under.



I'd like to give this two thumbs wayyyyyy DOWN! Hope you're alright Jocelyn.
 
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Sorry I don't know what the 3 ethics and 12 principals are?? Please direct me to explanation or repeat them
Thanks JJ Dyck
 
Julia Winter
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Oh No! Jocelyn, I hope all the bad stuff happens when you are full of happy meds. When I broke my ankle it was worse than unmedicated childbirth, and that wasn't complicated enough to require reduction under anesthesia. . . .
 
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Wow taking photographs sounds a dangerous biz Hope she is ok .

I have a small suggestion for Podcasts.
Why not invite a naturalist over to look at the project

Firstly to identify what lives there now then you can compare with the state in 5 years 10 years time etc .
Maybe an expert can give or enhance stuff that you have already seen to enhance your knowledge of the land

Secondly .
Give advice on how to keep the good guys

For me here in Europe I would be thinking - hedgehogs ,bats ,owls ,incect eating birds, Frogs ,toads ,woofers

For instance here in Europe I want there to be lots of long tailed tits so to help them I make sure there is lots of old growth Honeysuckle



And repel or keep out bad guys

For me this would be - Fox , Coypu , Wild Boar , Deer , Rabbit , Badger , the French govt

David
 
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Would love to hear about integrating non farming businesses and skills into permaculture systems, big learning curve to get started with farming for profit, may as well integrate the skills one already has to provide an income while setting up systems, love to hear your thoughts on this.
 
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You were NOT supposed to talk about "your farm is trying to kill you" thread!

Get better.
 
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I'm so sorry to hear about Jocelyn, I do wish you a speedy recovery.

I am a 100% pod person and have to support previous suggestions for observation as you walk. We'll get a better picture of what your place is like, and I'm sure it will be useful for both you and us to talk through what you see, what you think is happening and what you would like to do about it (or not). If you get visits from other Permies on a Sunday, it would be an easy topic for you, I'd love to hear you and Jack Spirko, Skeeter or anyone else with a slightly different viewpoint going for "walk in the woods"!

Another idea would be hand tools. I know you've spoken about certain power tools (earthmoving/tractors/mulchers/chainsaws..) but I'd like to know what hand tools you find invaluable and which ones you've found are a complete waste of time. This will be relevant to your Urban and Rural listeners alike. How about a simple knife, or a pruning saw? I only just replaced a wheelbarrow tyre with a solid one, before I found out a can of "emergency" vehicle tyre foam will last for years on a barrow...

Finally, thanks for continuing to dedicate your time to us! I know a lot of these topics would be better in a video, but I'm sure I'm not alone - I can't watch a video whilst driving to work. When I have time to watch a video, actually getting out and doing something, arranging the next local meeting or family always seems to be more important...

Alun.
 
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Okay, i confess. I'm 4 podcasts behind, but i have some suggestions anyway.

1. What to eat during the winter? I know you like Jackie Clay so canning is good in your book. What about freezing? Growing under low tunnels? Root cellars?

2. Fencing:
A. You mention that you don't like galvanized fencing, but the only reason i can recall is a science project that someone you met did in high school. Any further reasons or supporting research?
B. So what's the best alternative(s)? The Raising Chickens 2.0 article is still open on this subject. You're using electric on the farm. Do you think that is best or is this a temporary fix? What about for keeping deer out (we can't shoot them all year).

3. Tools: In one of the threads about your place, someone is talking about moving the electric fence and they mention 'that golf club thing' for cutting down weeds. That sounds intriguing. Can you elaborate? And i echo the above commenter's request for more hand tool feedback.

4. LGD: For greater than 5 acres, you recommended Great Pyrenes. What about for less than 5 acres? And, this may be a dumb question, but i'm assuming they sleep outside in a dog house? One by the house or a movable one out by the livestock?

5. In one podcast, you recommended that a woman scrape away her topsoil (which she says she could put in a 5 gallon bucket), then use the subsoil to erect earth berms around her yard. Wouldn't that leave her yard as a big depression, potentially wet, messy depression? Or am i such an introvert that i imagine my earth berms too big?

6. Swales: You mention at one point that you don't do swales. There is a thread about it, but there is no real reason given. Can you elaborate on your swale aversion?

7. In early podcasts, when discussing sealing ponds with pigs, you say that it is the shape of the foot that seals it. However, you say that Sepp learned to seal ponds from pigs, and he uses a bucket on a track hoe to press the soil down, which would suggest that it is the pigs' big, fat bodies slapping the mud that seal the pond. What are your current thoughts? ...which leads me to my last question (for the moment):

8. Those early podcasts were a long time ago. What has changed in your thinking since then? I'm sure you don't remember everything you said so just in general, where has your thinking changed?

Jocelyn, i hope and pray for a quick, pain-less recovery.
 
paul wheaton
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Jocelyn's home and has a cast.
 
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Sorry to hear about Jocelyn's arm, and that it's in a cast. Years ago I was able to apply a comfrey poultice (twice-daily) on a broken bone and made a full recovery in half the time estimated by the doc.
 
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Oh, Dear! I do hope Jocelyn gets better soon! As for walking pod casts . . . maybe you should wait for spring? ;P But in any event I would love "verbal tours" of your land. And I do suspect that you, Paul, really need to get out ON THE LAND yourself. It is after all YOURS. I know I hold the outline of my property in my mind and the thought of selling any of it off is nearly the same as considering an amputation. Odd isn't it.
But honestly Paul, pod casts or not I do encourage you to get out on your land, get the feel of it into your bones, listen to the birds, look at the spoor left by passing wild critters. You know. the FUN part.
Just, uh, do it when it isn't so slippery out, okay? Both of you! Stay safe!
 
paul wheaton
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I am currently working about a hundred hours per week. If I spend more time on the land, something else has to suffer.

There are tasks that I can delegate and there are tasks that I cannot delegate.

And, on top of all this, I'm getting too old to be working a hundred hours per week.

The list of things I "should" do, would keep me busy 10,000 hours per week. And when I prioritize, I end up getting to the lab not as often as I would like. We have been trying for months to take sundays off. The result has been that about every third sunday we will do non-permaculture (or non-empire) things from 4pm and on.

Jocelyn came up with a very clever solution. We're getting stuff done, getting onto the land more often AND getting a bit of walk in on a Sunday. A threefer! Stacking functions.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Just wanted to thank folks here and on FB for all the well wishes.

I had some comfrey poultices in the freezer, but alas, they are all gone now, and wouldn't penetrate the cast any way!

Might be sourcing some for tea though...

Paul recommended I take DE for the minerals. (Just for you, Jesse! )

I'll be tracking all your awesome requests. Cutting and pasting is easy one-handed!
 
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First thing I thought, Jocelyn, was "at least it happened in the winter!". I hope you mend fast and well...

I also would like to echo the idea of using your walks to narrate the design process - the observations you are making, the multitude of dreams you have for the place, etc. In fact, it would be great to see a thread on here with some of your design plans on it. I don't think I've seen a sketch of the land, only descriptions. It would be wonderful to see your developing plans...where you forsee the different zones happening, where you plan to build structures, etc...

I'm going through this process now with my (much smaller) project, and there's so much to this design process. I'm also doing the read-along of the Permaculture Design Manual, so my head's awhirl...
 
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Oh, Jocelyn, so distressed to hear about your breakage!! I know you'll heal fast and make lemonade from this citrus event :) Re: Paul, yes you are that fat, and I think the regular walking would/will be beneficial in many more ways than your brilliant mind can imagine at the moment. Walk with Jocelyn, JUST BECAUSE she wants to, and keep an eye out for the rewards later ;) You stepped out, into apparent chaos at the time, on the TED stage and Something responded... somehow, this 'walking adventure' smacks of the same challenge to 'just trust'....(especially trust Jocelyn :) Stay healthy, both of you!! ox
 
nancy sutton
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Oh, and Bravo! BRAVO !!! to you both, on the wonderful TED presentation :) It will definitely be a '10' to those who need to hear the message ;) And now I have something to send to inquiring minds, that is short enough and intriguing enough to goad their curiosity.... thx.

(And a special 'thank you' for sharing your experience in making that talk.... it is great gift.)
 
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I would like to know if you're doing a formal permaculture design for The Land and if so, please podcast on all the lovely details on that.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Well, the last two weekends have been a bust, sorry.

We'll get back on track and I'm taking note of the great suggestions here.

The first pic is before the broken arm.

The second is a week later, taking in a quiet moment atop the hollowed out volcano with submarine access here at base camp. Though we weren't quite up for a podcast then.
20140119_153710.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20140119_153710.jpg]
mugs
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[Thumbnail for 20140127_161623.jpg]
a grey day view down the sw slope of the volcano
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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jennifer dyck wrote:Sorry I don't know what the 3 ethics and 12 principals are?? Please direct me to explanation or repeat them
Thanks JJ Dyck



Hi JJ - welcome to permies! Paul probably won't do a podcast on these because it's not his thing, but I'll post some links for you.

The ethics are politically / spiritually / morality charged topics. They originated in Mollision's Designer's Manual - see the permies online book club discussions to hear a bit more about them. Mostly, here on permies, any discussion on the ethics takes place in the cider press forum, where a miniumum number of apples is required to participate.

Here's a site for the principles: http://permacultureprinciples.com/principles/.
 
Cj Sloane
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I've listened to 95% of the podcasts & I don't think I've heard anything about mushrooms. Maybe a little side mention about how Sepp used to be the Paul Stamits of Europe. & maybe a hint of an issue between Paul & Paul Stamits but that's it.
 
John Suavecito
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Paul explained on one of the podcasts that he and Paul Stamets had agreed to work together. Paul W. did a whole lot of work to prepare for it and make it happen and Paul S. didn't do his part at all, which was very frustrating to Paul W and made him feel like it wouldn't be worth it to work together. Paul S just said sorry and that was it. Meanwhile, Paul W still had his investment in time and money, preparation that was now worth nothing. Correct me if I'm wrong, somebody.
John S
PDX OR
 
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