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JARGON TRANSLATOR THREAD--post words here you don't know, or can explain to folks. thanks!  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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I have a couple of Ideas for inclusion in our Jargon Translator : the first one deserves a separate category and will probably fill up fast with examples!

------------------------------------
A word phrase that evokes a clear visual image 1) Chop and drop 2) Rock and Cob Lasagna Construction (walls and thermal benches) 3) eye candy i.e. builders eye candy
Aquaponics eye candy well laid out clear and well constructed example of its craft!4) the problem is the solution ( soil to acid for what you wanted to grow ?pant what likes acid soil)
 
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I like the idea, but i wonder, why not use the Permaculture Wiki for this?

--- Ludger
 
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Ludger Merkens wrote:I like the idea, but i wonder, why not use the Permaculture Wiki for this?



Why not both?
 
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Caleb Worner wrote:
The great Ben "Vermont Rice" Falk has had a very professional glossary on his site for years that would be a great resource:

http://www.wholesystemsdesign.com/design-vocabulary

***

A last thought. If this were taken seriously it could contribute largely to creating a global basic permaculture vocabulary. I'm passionate about language and would eventually like to do a published project like this, potentially illustrated to better communicate forms from earthworks, botany, hydrology, fluid dynamics, and natural building.



Caleb, that list on the link you posted was amazing! AND originally I wanted to make this into a PDF and somehow make it pretty so sort of what you are talking about with the illustrations. It would be so incredibly awesome if this project bloomed into what you are proposing.
 
Ludger Merkens
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Why not both?



Go ahead, do both, but it is double workload to put it in place. If not done properly it is also 2 places you need to know to find the results.
A Thread like this, is likely to go dead over some time, while the wiki already provides index pages, where you would actually look up a term you don't understand.
While it is fun, to collect such a glossary, its main benefit will be for those, who can't already write the glossary. From my perspective, this means you need a system meant for lookup/retrival. The wiki thus seems just more apropriate.

The benefit of 'putting it into two places' is, you can find it in two places. Optimum would probably be to do the 'meta' work here, while putting the results into the wiki. (With 'meta' I mean, collecting the resouces etc.)
Links forth and back, are probably also a good idea.

--- Ludger
 
Burra Maluca
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Ludger Merkens wrote:
Go ahead, do both, but it is double workload to put it in place. If not done properly it is also 2 places you need to know to find the results.
A Thread like this, is likely to go dead over some time



There are ways to keep a thread here alive, and organised.

It could be a locked thread, so that it's essentially one post which can be updated.

It could be listed in the how permies.com works thread, which is regularly bumped up so people keep finding it.

We could list the link above the most appropriate forum, like we do with, for instance, the links to feed the empire . publishing standards . promote your stuff . about the staff . how permies.com works in the tinkering forum.
 
Ludger Merkens
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Burra Maluca wrote:
There are ways to keep a thread here alive, and organised.

It could be a locked thread, so that it's essentially one post which can be updated.
It could be listed in the how permies.com works thread, which is regularly bumped up so people keep finding it.

We could list the link above the most appropriate forum, like we do with, for instance, the links to feed the empire . publishing standards . promote your stuff . about the staff . how permies.com works in the tinkering forum.



All good ideas, but it still looks to me, like spending lots of energy, just to cure the symptoms.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Ludger, this thread isn't the end result of this thread, if that makes sense. We started this thread to brainstorm, get ideas of permaculture words people didn't understand when they started, and have our permies family provide definitions for as many of the terms as possible. The end result of this will be some sort of document, that will be linked to in a thread here on permies (probably the tinkering with this site thread, like Burra mentioned) but THIS thread will always be a place where people can tell us about words they were confused about and we can then add it to this list. It is a work in progress and it is not finished.
 
Ludger Merkens
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Hello Cassie,

well thats exactly, what I wanted to suggest. Keep the brainstorming and collection of material in this thread, (thats the 'meta' part) but put the 'result' somewhere, you can find it. I'm not sure about the 'some sort of document' part of your Message. But I'm optimistic.

--- Ludger
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Some sort of document could mean a pdf or a locked google drive doc or something else. Not sure yet.
 
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The different meanings the word pattern can have?

http://www.permies.com/t/40473/tnk/Pattern-recognition-skills
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Hey Everyone! Thanks SO much for helping out with this project! Here is the "finished" product: Permaculture Jargon Translator

It definitely has room for improvement so if you want anything added or changed, let us know by posting in this thread.
 
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This list is awesome...a great reference. Thank you for putting it together!
 
Cassie Langstraat
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I am SO glad you enjoyed it!!
 
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Can we add to the black locust definition:

black locust: a highly rot resistant wood, traditionally used for fence posts. Able to withstand direct soil contact for years without rotting.

(I'd say it's not a particularly good choice for a hugel bed).
 
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As I was reading throughout this a moment ago, I thought it would be good to add internal referencing.

The list is alphabetical order which is good but related terms are not seen to have any connection.

For example, Starting from the top, I come across "brown permaculture" which is a fine thing, but loses meaning if it is not contrasted with "purple permaculture" and by the time I got down to the P section to find "purple permaculture" it was no longer a relevant questioning my mind. I think it would be a nice addition if conceptually related terms had "see also: X" added after the definition.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Julia Winter wrote:Can we add to the black locust definition:

black locust: a highly rot resistant wood, traditionally used for fence posts. Able to withstand direct soil contact for years without rotting.

(I'd say it's not a particularly good choice for a hugel bed).



Done! Thanks Julia.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Chad Sentman wrote:As I was reading throughout this a moment ago, I thought it would be good to add internal referencing.

The list is alphabetical order which is good but related terms are not seen to have any connection.

For example, Starting from the top, I come across "brown permaculture" which is a fine thing, but loses meaning if it is not contrasted with "purple permaculture" and by the time I got down to the P section to find "purple permaculture" it was no longer a relevant questioning my mind. I think it would be a nice addition if conceptually related terms had "see also: X" added after the definition.



I think this is a great idea! Can you come up with other terms that need this besides brown and purple permaculture?
 
allen lumley
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Recently posted and I don't know ! Hugel-Swales, Bench Swales, Coppice Swales I expect these are only a matter of degree but there was no explanation
in the context ! Big AL
 
Julia Winter
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I would guess that a hugel swale has a hugelkultur bed running alongside it. Possibly you dig extra deep, deposit word, then fill in for a shallow swale, but I doubt that.

Again guessing, but a coppice swale may be a swale planted with good coppice trees. Geoff Lawton often says that swales are tree growing systems. Coppice trees are those that respond well to being cut back to the ground (or to a set point) every year or three. They make a bunch of sticks, which can be harvested almost in perpetuity for fuel or other use.

Bench swale - I have no idea.
 
Burra Maluca
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Can we put PEX and PEP1 and PEP2 in the translator?

It's roughly Permaculture EXperience, and Permaculture Experience Paul-style, version 1 and 2.
 
allen lumley
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- ''Lasagna build or system'', a fellow member points out that the more dense rock material you put in your Rocket Mass Heaters Thermal Mass the less Cob
you have to make-up, just trial fit your piece, dip it in a clay slip and set inlace with just enough cob to make the whole thing Monolithic !

-'' Lasagna Effect ''- Using a layering system to create Hugel-mounds can have the Effect that a layer or layers can shed water away from the Hugel- bed,
rather than allow that water to be soaked in ? apparently Paul W. discusses this in the World Domination Gardening 4 DVD Set !

As these terms might get confused or someone might try to carry the message of one to the other, they should both be listed ! Big AL
 
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Burra Maluca wrote:
Meadows - I understood that meadows were cut for hay, while pasture was just grazed. But that might just be my own interpretation, or a UK thing...



Meadow - A small area of grassland within a larger ecosystem of something else. Usually forest.
 
Will Meginley
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Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:
what is a meadow really? what causes a naturally-occurring meadow (assuming they really do occur in nature)? is it the regrowth of a forest-fire-affected area, or is it a dynamic thing? how can there be plants that grow at the edges of forest and meadow if there aren't naturally-occurring meadows? what causes a naturally-occurring forest fire, if nature's amazing balance supposedly covers teh soil and keeps it so moist and fertile and trees are such a great slower-downer of storms and capturers of rain? OK, this kind of extended beyond the term itself, but I'd love to know what a permaculturist's definition of things are, what a permaculturist sees that an ecologist or other natural scientist may have missed seeing. May or may not be appropriate to the glossary, I guess at least a basic definition will work for people: a meadow's a big open space that has grassy-type things instead of trees growing in it.



Meadows can have many causes. Fire is one of them. Localized outbreaks of tree disease/pests is another. Perhaps the soil is too inundated with water for trees to grow (meadows often occur in flat areas along streams). Even humans could be the cause (slash and burn agriculture, logging, moving large amounts of livestock through, etc.) Basically, anything that kills trees will create a meadow until the trees have time to grow back.


As for why fires still occur despite what they tell you about S.O.M. being great for moisture retention and trees slowing runoff:

Short answer: That's all true but the moisture is held several centimeters down under the litter layer (the fallen leaves and bits of twigs, etc. laying on the surface.) The sun still dries out the litter layer the same way it dries your cloths, and this surface layer is what forest fires feed on when they pass through. In areas with really deep litter where part of it remains moist the fire will burn all the way down to the moist layer and then go out, leaving some organic matter intact in the soil. This is one of the reasons prescribed burning usually takes place in the spring - before the hot summer sun has had a chance to completely dry out the entire organic layer.
 
Will Meginley
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:bone yard



Bone Yard - slang term for what's known in permaculture as a "zone of accumulation" (i.e. that place you throw all your junk until you can repurpose/recycle it).
 
Will Meginley
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Caleb Worner wrote:
aspect (of land)



Aspect - The direction a sloping piece of land faces. Simplest way to describe it: look straight down hill. The direction you're looking is the aspect. If you're looking south it's a south aspect, etc.
 
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I would personally love it if a rocket mass heater techie who is a decent editor would go through the document and spruce up all the RMH jargon sections, sprinkling it with commas and periods as appropriate and trying to make the language clearer, maybe more visual. I couldn't quite get my head around most of the concepts. I did at least walk away with "watch out for hydrogen atoms!"
 
When all four tires fall off your canoe, how many tiny ads does it take to build a doghouse?
One million tiny ads for $25
https://permies.com/t/94684/million-tiny-ads
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