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Ways to Treat Infections Without using Antibiotics ... What is yours?  RSS feed

 
Anne Miller
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This year I intended to plant some systemic medicals.  As usual, life got in the way.

I would like to know what others use to treat infections so that you do not have to go to the doctor and get prescribed antibiotics.  Sometimes folks are in situations where going to the doctor is not an option so having this information might be very handy.  What common items do you use?

I recently had some sort of crud on my face that I thought might be impetigo which is a staph infection that is treated with antibiotics.  I could not go to the doctor so I used what was available.  Alternating rounds of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide.  The crusty  scaly area went away with 3 or 4 days of using this treatment.

 
Dan Boone
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Sometimes (not always) a strong tincture of yarrow root (basically, jam a jar full of washed fresh roots and cover with whiskey) used as a mouth wash/soak will beat back infections in bad teeth.  At least temporary relief of pain and inflammation is common although not assured, and sometimes a jaw infection can be "cured" for weeks or months by doing this two or three times a day for several days.

You don't *have* to swallow, but when you've got a toothache, it's no time to be wasting whiskey in my view...
 
Stacy Witscher
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I'm very interested in this as my family and my dogs are currently battling MRSA. I seen some research on the use of probiotics to treat MRSA, but it's not prescriptive, it just says it could be helpful.
 
Anne Miller
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Regarding MSRA - on another thread:

Todd Parr wrote:I personally cured doctor-diagnosed MRSA with grapefruit seed extract and raw honey.


From my research:  MRSA - The symptoms of MRSA depend on where you're infected. Most often, it causes mild infections on the skin, like sores or boils. But it can also cause more serious skin infections or infect surgical wounds, the bloodstream, the lungs, or the urinary tract.

Though most MRSA infections aren't serious, some can be life-threatening. Many public health experts are alarmed by the spread of tough strains of MRSA. Because it's hard to treat, MRSA is sometimes called a "super bug."
 
Linda Secker
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Garlic and ginger - plus raw honey if you can get it - 'can' cure chest infections, or at least hold them at bay long enough to get some antibiotics....
 
Todd Parr
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Stacy Witscher wrote:I'm very interested in this as my family and my dogs are currently battling MRSA. I seen some research on the use of probiotics to treat MRSA, but it's not prescriptive, it just says it could be helpful.


Like Anne saw in the other thread, I cured it with honey and grapefruit seed extract, both applied directly to it.  Manuka honey cures it faster.  Put the honey directly in the wound and cover with a bandage.  I normally changed it morning and night.  Once a day before putting the honey on it again, I put grapefruit seed extract on it.  After 5 minutes or so it itches and burns, so I would wash it off and then put the honey on again.  I think the honey alone would cure it, but this is the way I did it.  Standard disclaimers apply, I'm not a doctor and cannot by law or in good conscience recommend medical treatments, I'm just passing on what I did.  Mine was a pretty bad infection with open sores that you could see into more than an inch and as big around as my little finger.  It was pretty scary.
 
Todd McDonald
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For topical treatment of infected cuts, wounds, and something that I believe may have been staph, I have had tremendous results with goldenseal. Mix the powdered root with aloe to make a paste, apply that to the infected area and cover with a bandage or bandaid. Change it out twice a day.

I have taken goldenseal internally by putting the powder in capsules, I believe you can also buy pre-made capsules. Be careful when using it this way as it is hard on the liver. Allow at least 12 hours between doses and don't take it continuously for more than two weeks. I AM NOT A DOCTOR, just someone who has had great results and is passing that info on for others.
 
Richard Kastanie
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Stephen Buhner's book "Herbal Antibiotics" is a very useful resource.
 
John Rickenbacker
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First realize that a staph infection can be life threatening.  These bugs are the culprits that cause septic shock.  If you see ted streaks emanating from your infection, break glass, go to ER, don't mess around.

I had one of these skin infections recently on shin, and it was scary gross.  I found that topical chlorhexidine 2% applied often and soaked in a band-aid was very effective.  It's written and my experience confirms that these infections may lurk months as tiny yellow subcutaneous spots, so it bears watching and can get tedious.  The literature states that staph are particularly susceptible to chlorhexidine.  This is a disinfectant, not an antibiotic, of course.   The treatment is superficial, so you haven't wrecked your gut flora etc.

Mine, which was a chancre maybe a 1/4 inch in height and 1/2 inch in diameter, started in NOv 2016, was mostly gone within a month except for follow up on tiny yellow spots or things that look like they might be tiny yellow spots.

I recommend against alcohol and peroxide used often because this will injure your skin somewhat and retard healing. Antibiotic cream (triple) was no help and maybe harmed in early stages; it prevents drying of the wound.

I don't believe there is an herbal source for chlorhexidine.  It is benign, being used in moujthwash.

I am not a healthcare professional.  Good luck!
 
Stacy Witscher
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One of my biggest concerns is getting things for the dogs handled while treating the family. Topical salves don't work well for the dogs as they just lick everything off quickly. I'm upping their baths, unfortunately one of my dogs hates water. I am hoping to find some kind of topical spray for in between baths, something that is light enough that they won't try to lick it. The pit bulls are prone to furuncles, which them become infected with MRSA. The chihuahua has terrible skin problems, I'm pretty sure she was the original cause of the MRSA, the vet kept putting her on meds. So, anyway, I'm looking for an integrated approach.

My infections aren't large, there are just a lot of them, a couple dozen on my arms, a few on my chest, and now a couple on my thighs. And the crusty nose so common with MRSA. I've been dealing with these skin infection for years, but never knew what they were, just got a diagnosis, previous doctor's just told me I was crazy.
 
Judith Browning
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Stacy Witscher wrote:One of my biggest concerns is getting things for the dogs handled while treating the family. Topical salves don't work well for the dogs as they just lick everything off quickly. I'm upping their baths, unfortunately one of my dogs hates water. I am hoping to find some kind of topical spray for in between baths, something that is light enough that they won't try to lick it. The pit bulls are prone to furuncles, which them become infected with MRSA. The chihuahua has terrible skin problems, I'm pretty sure she was the original cause of the MRSA, the vet kept putting her on meds. So, anyway, I'm looking for an integrated approach.

My infections aren't large, there are just a lot of them, a couple dozen on my arms, a few on my chest, and now a couple on my thighs. And the crusty nose so common with MRSA. I've been dealing with these skin infection for years, but never knew what they were, just got a diagnosis, previous doctor's just told me I was crazy.


I wonder if tea tree oil might help your skin infections? I've used it for healing cuts and a few times for an area that seemed like it was getting infected. It's worth keeping a small bottle of good quality essential oil around for occasional cuts. EDIT to say it probably wouldn't be good for the dogs if they lick it off...most info says don't take it internally although people do for certain things.
Tea tree oil is thought to have antiseptic properties and has been used to prevent and treat infections. Other traditional uses of tea tree oil include treatment of fungal infections (including fungal infections of the nails and athlete's foot), dental health, parasites, skin allergic reactions, and vaginal infections.
  http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/tea-tree-oil/background/hrb-20060086

I've had good experiences with golden seal as someone above mentions...both for myself for healing and for my mother's eyes in years past.  She was prone to conjunctivitis. I used it as an eye wash and that cleared it up quickly, but during use the area around her eyes looked jaundiced from the color of the golden seal root.  At the time we were growing it and only used a small amount of root for the eye wash.  It's another herb that is worth having a small amount dried and available....it seems to stay potent a long time.
 
Stacy Witscher
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I think that my infections haven't become very serious because I already use tea tree oil and clove oil in my body products, like body butter. The antimicrobial essential oils were part of my idea for shampoo and topical sprays for the dogs. I just need to look into emulsifying agents to make a spray, etc.
 
Judith Browning
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Stacy Witscher wrote:I think that my infections haven't become very serious because I already use tea tree oil and clove oil in my body products, like body butter. The antimicrobial essential oils were part of my idea for shampoo and topical sprays for the dogs. I just need to look into emulsifying agents to make a spray, etc.


I've taken astragalus for several years for the immune system boost after having had tick fever.  It is also said to help with infections, this article includes staph and MRSA.  Maybe you are already familiar with it? I don't know if this is the best site for info but the first I ran across http://www.astragalus.com/antiviral-and-antibacterial/a-natural-antiviral-and-antibacterial-herb ; I like Stephen Buhner's site as mentioned in a post above...he speaks highly of astragalus and many other herbal remedies.

In the lab, astragalus demonstrates antibacterial activity against:

    Shigella dysenteriae, which can cause bloody diarrhea.
    Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause staph infections and MRSA.
    Streptococcus hemolyticus, a virulent form of strep that can cause scarlet and rheumatic fever.


 
Anne Miller
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Richard Kastanie wrote:Stephen Buhner's book "Herbal Antibiotics" is a very useful resource.


I have his book and highly recommend it.  The quotes in my signature line are from this book. 
 
Thyri Gullinvargr
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Todd Parr wrote:Like Anne saw in the other thread, I cured it with honey and grapefruit seed extract, both applied directly to it.  Manuka honey cures it faster.  Put the honey directly in the wound and cover with a bandage.  I normally changed it morning and night.  Once a day before putting the honey on it again, I put grapefruit seed extract on it.  After 5 minutes or so it itches and burns, so I would wash it off and then put the honey on again.  I think the honey alone would cure it, but this is the way I did it.  Standard disclaimers apply, I'm not a doctor and cannot by law or in good conscience recommend medical treatments, I'm just passing on what I did.  Mine was a pretty bad infection with open sores that you could see into more than an inch and as big around as my little finger.  It was pretty scary.


Apparently sugar paste works too: http://alsearsmd.com/2010/07/heal-your-wounds-the-sweet-way/
 
Joshua Parke
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Did anyone mention colloidal silver? Super easy and cheap to make.  And from what I recall it's best to make your own because it has an electrical charge that diminishes as it sits.  Which is said to be of great importance to it's effectiveness.  So don't waste your money on the stuff at the store unless you're in a pinch.

Now that I've mentioned it....I wanna say that I believe in building health overall instead of just treating symptoms.  To me, I like to think of colloidal silver as the thing that is used only when needed, and it's rarely needed.  And now days I don't want to put all that metal into my body, even if it is effective.  But I still have the ability to make it if it's ever needed, and won't hesitate to ingest it if it's that dire.

Around 7-8 years ago when I learned of colloidal silver I drank a quart per day for two or three days in a row. I had made a few gallons over the course of a couple months...and drank it all during that time frame.  I would typically drink around half to a full quart per day. I think it's more effective like that, and I simply wanted to share, especially for those people who are afraid to take an effective dose.  Look into it though for sure, because if you make it incorrectly you'll end up ingesting other stuff that isn't good for you.  It's simple to make correctly...use distilled water ONLY.  Using tap water or adding salt is how people get argyria when ingesting colloidal silver.  And some people mention that they like to eat fermented foods afterwards to repopulate their gut with some good microbes.  I don't recall eating fermented foods intentionally to repopulate my gut....but that was during the time I was learning to make fermented food.

On the topic of fermented food.. I think I'm recalling that fermented foods will repopulate the gut with good microbes that take out the bad microbes.  So maybe that could be used as an "antibiotic" for the gut..??
 
Deb Rebel
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I do caution very strongly about using colloidal silver because of it may do more harm than good. I developed metal allergies to the point I can only tolerate Platinum 950 and Titanium. Niobium is an alt I haven't tried yet. These are the metals of last resort if you have metal allergies (contact with skin takes minutes to a few days. If it's metallic I don't do well. I even migrated past high carat gold as the alloy metals and impurities would get me). I would not dare just because of that and other health issues that seem to preclude introducing higher concentrations of a possible allergen into my body.

For me wound care is number one if you have open wound or abcess. Sterilizing and lancing abcesses with care, then good hygienic wound care will help a lot. For organics I will use hydrogen peroxide to 'eat' the foreign organics. Frequent wound dressing changes at the beginning, don't be afraid to open up/uncover, clean, and redress the wound. A hot pack carefully applied to increase circulation can also help with both swelling and the body dealing with the issue itself.

Some do swear by honey as a topical and it has both anectdotal and medical trials behind it. 

For spider, ant, bites; bee and especially hornet stings; I tend to use medical grade activated charcoal and a preparation including plantain extract as a poultice to draw the venoms out of the flesh. Meat tenderizer containing papayin (extract of papaya) works on the hornet stings applied as a poultice.

As with all treatments, results may vary.
 
Megan Palmer
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This thread might be of interest https://www.permies.com/t/42434/kitchen/garlic-cure-bacterial-infections
 
John C Daley
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Ok, whats MRSA, everybody else seems to know what you are talking about, I cannot work it out?
 
Burra Maluca
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Anne Miller
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Deb Rebel wrote:Some do swear by honey as a topical and it has both anectdotal and medical trials behind it. 

For spider, ant, bites; bee and especially hornet stings; I tend to use medical grade activated charcoal and a preparation including plantain extract as a poultice to draw the venoms out of the flesh. Meat tenderizer containing papayin (extract of papaya) works on the hornet stings applied as a poultice.  As with all treatments, results may vary.


Good to know about activated charcoal for insect bites as I had never heard of using it.  I have plantain and found it to be helpful, too.

As a comment regarding using honey, DH had a place on his face that his doctor thought was a "recurring cancer" and referred him to a dermatologist.  He never  went, instead used applications of honey.  It wasn't an overnight cure as it took many months of application.
 
Anne Miller
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This topic has some good imfo:

https://permies.com/t/19864/kitchen/guess-cold-home-remedies#166565

Especially this and a Fire Cider recipe.

Melba Corbett wrote:Lots of good information already posted.  The cayenne and ginger are heating herbs and help combat a "cold" condition of the body, not just a cold. 
If the left nostril is primarily clogged that is a sodium deficiency (not table salt, but green vegetables or celery as a source), and the right indicates a potassium deficiency (think apple cider vinegar, lemons or carrots).  Sore throat is a sulfur deficiency (onions, garlic, kale or collards,  or the supplement MSM).  A cold is a deficiency of all three.  Juicing carrots and celery and adding something as a sulfur component works pretty well.  Once the cold has started though, and taken hold, the body has such an accumulation of mucus it needs to throw off, it may persist for a while until the process is complete.  Quicken that process by keeping the bowels freely flowing (magnesium, more liquids, etc. ) 
I've taken 1/4 tsp. of MSM granules in juice for a sore throat and yes, it tastes horrible; but it stopped it in about one minute. 
 
James Freyr
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned MMS. It stands for miracle mineral solution. Chemically, it's NaClO2, and it comes in a two part solution, one containing the sodium chlorite, and the other citric acid. How it works: Mix part A and part B according to directions, the citric acid knocks the two oxygens off the compound yielding individual oxygens, or free radicals and what remains is NaCl, or table salt. It will kill both viruses and bacteria and interestingly, it doesn't seem to mess up my gut like antibiotics do. The only problem now is it's getting hard to find as the FDA doesn't like it because it's cheap and safe which means folks don't spend money on doctors or prescriptions. (remember, the FDA is a conglomerate headed by former pharmaceutical, chemical and food industry executives who do favors to protect industry profits. It no longer functions as a watchdog for the people as originally intended) It can still be found, and those seeking it in the states may have to get it from a foreign country.
 
Joshua Parke
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Even though I mentioned it....I too recommend looking to ingesting colloidal silver as a last resort.  And as Deb mentioned, some people can't tolerate it.  So if you have sensitivities to metals, I would urge you to heed Deb's advice.  I personally prefer herbs, juice, food, cleansing, instead of ingesting metal.  But if it's all that you have, it can be useful.  Fasting will remove metals from the body.  I gave some to a couple recently that adopted a puppy that had been quite neglected.  The puppy had some type of sores on its skin.  They put it in a spray bottle to apply it, the puppy looked better three days later.  I think the particle size was a little too big, but it still seems to be helping.  I haven't used a lot of colloidal silver so I can't share many stories on it.  There are videos on youtube of colloidal silver under a microscope killing pathogens. 

Vetericyn  --  I have this on hand for all the animals.  I've used it for years on wounds to speed up healing, and it will prevent scars if used consistently.  I've noticed that it also works on skin, "infections/rashes/parasites", I think it works on all of those things if I'm recalling correctly.  I chatted with someone that used this on her young daughters face after a big cut from an accident that would of left a thick scar.  She said that she specifically used it because she knew that it would heal quickly with no scar.

Junos Story:An Herbal Wound Case   <--This is a thread by Doc Jones here on permies.  Follow the link from that post to his site for more info on that case, there is another case story linked within that one.  Very incredible case stories.  It's amazing what herbs can do for the body.  I use herbs all the time for myself and my animals, I find them very effective.

Cleansing, juice fasting, eating very clean and juicing...can be incredibly helpful for all situations of infection.  It will give the body a rest, and then it can spend time strengthening the immune system to help eradicate the infection.  And there are many things to add to your juice to help get rid of those infections.  Chilis, garlic, fresh herbs, ginger, turmeric, are some that would likely help.  Lou Corona has a popular juice recipe that would probably be good, called, Lemon Ginger Blast.

On the MMS  ---  I spent a lot of time researching it 4-5 years ago, and it seemed promising.  I gave it a try...for a short while.  There are many glorious stories of it on the the internet from what I remember.  But I would caution anyone using this internally.
 
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