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Tiny House Cook Stove and Heater  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 320
Location: North Olympic Peninsula
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Michael Linville wrote:I’m wondering if it’d work okay to scale this system down to a 4” one. I’m living in the foothills of the Himalayans, and the local stoves all have 4” flues. I would use it (at least for this season) solely for heat and some cooking. I won’t do the mass heater part or even the extra part for warming water. I don’t have a lot of room, and it’ll be freestanding in the middle of the room (I’ll move it at the end of the season). Basically, I’m thinking about building your riser-less core and adding a top to it (granite, concrete, or a big slab of rock).  I can get the ceramic fiber panels, and I’ll put a metal casing around the sides and bottom.  Do you see any red flags to this? I greatly appreciate your help, and I greatly appreciate you sharing this new system you’ve developed!



Michael, thanks so much for the kind words and interest.  I have to admit that I truly do not know the answer to your question.  I suspect that it would likely scale down and work wonderfully, although I do only think that of your proposed configuration.  I do not think a 4" core would function at all trying to drive mass.  However, a simple little cook stove made by capturing the core in a metal skin like my Aluminum Series has a very good chance of functioning acceptably, in my opinion.  I think it's worth a try.
 
pollinator
Posts: 203
Location: SW Ontario, Zone 5
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I'm am really loving this design Matt!

I am setting up an off grid camper trailer to live in as I build and this stove might be the thing for me to keep warm in the winter and cook on. 

So with that, I'm looking to keep the weight down of course.  I won't be towing the trailer around though and will support the floor. 

Any thoughts on tweaking things things here and there in the design to keep it as small as possible? 

It's a fine line to balance the weight issue in a trailer with having a nice mass to keep the heat in over the night.  I wonder where that line might be when installing this kind of stove in a camper trailer?  I certainly can't be running the propane furnace all winter in Ontario to stay warm and cook with...

Any way.  Great stuff here Matt.  I'll post my build if I do end up putting this design in the trailer.  Thanks for the videos, they are super helpful!
 
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Hi Matt

Thank you very much for what you are doing.
Your builds and videos are very informative and inspiring. Even if they are not exactly what I want to build, they are close enough for me to learn from them. But since they are not exactly the build I was hoping to make for my home, I was just wondering if you have a two for one price that has the plans and guide for both the Tiny Masonry Cook Stove and the Full Masonry Cook Stove?

And by any chance, do you also have plans for you Aluminum stoves?

And do you have plans of coming up with a book or maybe even a video series for sale about the science, mechanics, and the detailed instructions for building your cook stoves/ovens including options and modifications like white ovens, black ovens, etc?

Thank you again for what you have shared to everyone.
 
Posts: 1
Location: Currently Dubai - Moving to Paute nr Cuenca - Ecuador
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Hello Matt,
I've just downloaded your plans for the Tiny Stove - I appreciate all the work you've put in!
I work with hot glass in kilns and furnaces, and have some experience with ceramic fibreboard. While it's light, easy to cut, and obviously heat resistant, I don't have quite so much confidence about the long term durability.
We use mullite kiln shelves which are solid - a similar consistency and hardness to firebrick, and are available in various thicknesses. The pieces would naturally have to be fire-cemented together.
We regularly take the mullite shelves up to around 1800º F, but haven't gone much higher than that.

Assuming I can cut it relatively easily, if I wanted to construct the core in this type of material, or fire-brick for durability, how do you think it would affect the thermal performance?
The ceramic fibre would no doubt have more of an insulating effect on the surrounding bricks I'm guessing??
 
garden master
Posts: 1362
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Hi Mike;
Until Matt has time to respond. I will give you my opinion of your idea. Keep in mind that Matt's opinion as a master builder may wildly differ from mine.
Apparently ceramic board hardens after firing but retains its insinuative property's.  It does not hold up long if exposed to abrasion. After  reading about "mullite shelves" it sounds like they are built for strength at high temps not insulation. 
Ceramic boards are being used for the insinuative value not strength or abrasion resistance.  I suspect  if you were to replace cf board with mullite in Matts stove design that it may not function properly at all.  You need the heat to travel to its  destination not lose its "steam" heating up the mullite and whatever is behind it. 
My understanding of Matts riserless design is that it needs to keep moving to reach the desired temperatures for a clean burn.
In a J tube application split firebrick is being used in the feed tube for abrasion then switching to ceramic fiber board for the burn tunnel and start of riser.  Ceramic blanket is being used as a riser.
With some investigation/ experimentation "mullite" might make a suitable / superior ?  feed tube material.
 
Matt Walker
pollinator
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Location: North Olympic Peninsula
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Hey guys, sorry I missed so many posts here. 

Mike, Thomas got it pretty much exactly right. No surprise there!  The CFB doesn't hold up too well to abrasion, but it lasts indefinitely in the flame path.  I find that I don't beat up my firebox as much as one would expect, these stoves are cool and easy to load so you don't bang wood into them like in a typical box stove.  As such, I'm on year three with my core and while there is visible wear in the firebox it still isn't an issue. When it's time to replace, a couple new small cheek boards can be easily inserted into the firebox and I'm good for a few more years. 

The performance benefit is worth it to me to deal with a bit of abrasion wear.  The firebox is sized such that one could line it with firebrick splits, or your kiln shelf, to eliminate wear issues, but I've found that I don't care for how that performs.  It creates poor burns and hot, hard loading conditions. That's a decision that one can make on their own once the stove is built.

As for building the whole core out of Mullite, I suspect performance would suffer.  That said, I'm just wrapping up a firebrick version of this core to offer with the Tiny Cook Stove Plans for those who can't or don't want to source ceramic fiber board.  The efficiency will suffer a bit, but they are still fantastic cook stoves.  So, I suspect you could use the mullite if you preferred.  If you do, I'd love to hear your experience.

Ju, the aluminum stoves are just skins over my ceramic board cores, so the core plans basically are the aluminum stoves.  I'm happy to help with skin details if you decide to build one.  I don't have any package deals at the moment, but I really like the ideas for books and video series you propose.  I will work on those!  Thanks for the kind words.

Simon, you are right it's a fine line.  I suspect that if you build just the stove body with no bench you would have a small cook stove mass heater that would heat your space for 8 hours or so after a burn.  Hope that helps.

Thanks all for the support!!

 
Matt Walker
pollinator
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Location: North Olympic Peninsula
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I just received a lovely email from a customer and I had to share this beautiful work with you all.  Check out this gorgeous Tiny Cook Stove!  It is so cool to see these coming to life, thanks for all of your support Permies!








You can see more here.

 
Posts: 36
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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Nice Coleman stove! What are those metal pipes sticking out used for?
 
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