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!!!!!!!! Easiest Vegetable to Grow  RSS feed

 
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Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:

Sara Rosenberg wrote:
Additionally, I love planting onions and garlic because you just can't screw it up.
.



Hmmmm. The first time I grew onions they were a huge success. About 1990. Since then........ DISASTER!



what type of disaster? sometimes mine flower but not a big deal, just means i process & freeze more that year.
 
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The most easiest is likely sunchoke. It just can't go wrong, just dig a few small holes, throw in 1-2 per hole (from a biological store), cover with earth and you are done. Once they are flowered and ready you can harvest whenever you want, even under snow. leave a few inside and next years sunchoke is prepared.
 
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Chris Palmberg wrote:I find that the versatility and adaptablity of summer squash make them hard to screw up.  You can pretty much start a compost pile heavy in yard waste, throw seeds into the mix, and three months later, you're lurking in church parking lots in your community in search of unlocked cars and open pickup beds to leave your surplus because you...just...CAN'T anymore.



Me too, except with cucumbers, I guess it's a good problem to have though!

Of course, the variety you pick helps, not so much in getting better yields, but rather in avoiding zucchini the size of your leg.  Gold/Yellow Zukes, for example, are brightly colored enough to be easily found in the jungle of vines that sometimes seems obligatory.  Yellow Crookneck or Pattypans are similar, as are various types that lean closer to gray or are mottled.  The classic dark green varieties, however, can be hard to find, and as a result you're likely to be overrun.



Yeah, they are a lot easier to find when they are a different color!
 
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Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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Sara Rosenberg wrote:

Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:

Sara Rosenberg wrote:
Additionally, I love planting onions and garlic because you just can't screw it up.
.



Hmmmm. The first time I grew onions they were a huge success. About 1990. Since then........ DISASTER!



what type of disaster? sometimes mine flower but not a big deal, just means i process & freeze more that year.



They just sit there, sprout slightly or rot. I have lived in a number if different places with different climates and soils but as soon as an onion set sees me it just gives up.
This winter even my broad beans failed.
Feeling got at.....
 
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What I love about corn salad, miner's lettuce and some of the kale + relatives, is that when we get hammered with our "every 3-5 year" snowstorm or freezing spell, they generally bounce back and put out fresh growth even if the leaves you were about to pick, end up in the compost.
Yesterday I shoveled 20 inches of snow off a composted wood chip pile and found enough "new" potatoes to roast for dinner tonight.
 
Sara Rosenberg
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:

Sara Rosenberg wrote:

Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:

Sara Rosenberg wrote:
Additionally, I love planting onions and garlic because you just can't screw it up.
.



Hmmmm. The first time I grew onions they were a huge success. About 1990. Since then........ DISASTER!



what type of disaster? sometimes mine flower but not a big deal, just means i process & freeze more that year.



They just sit there, sprout slightly or rot. I have lived in a number if different places with different climates and soils but as soon as an onion set sees me it just gives up.
This winter even my broad beans failed.
Feeling got at.....



ooooooh, i understand. Slicing tomatoes and snow peas do the same to me.
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Meg Mitchell wrote:Leaf veg are probably easiest to grow, since leaves grow before flowers and fruit. Maybe chard? I spent two seasons trying to grow chard and mostly failed, then angrily threw the remainder of the seeds near my garden gate, and now there's a healthy little chard population there.



That's funny, yeah I've had that same experience, that some vegetables grow best when I give up on them and they do their own thing!
 
Jay Angler
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Steve Thorn wrote:

That's funny, yeah I've had that same experience, that some vegetables grow best when I give up on them and they do their own thing!

This is such a good reason for saving seed and then just spreading a mix of seeds around at different times of the year on any bare or thin patches - the seeds get to choose! Some of my favourite seeds/plants for that are: chard, kale (and close relatives), walking onion, parsley, diakon radish (the seed buds are quite edible even if you don't get a good root) and some of the good companion plants like borage.
 
Steve Thorn
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Travis Johnson wrote:I think potatoes are one of the easiest. They do not even need soil, yet their biggest problem is potatoes bugs and they can be picked off by hand. Obtaining seeds is as easy as buying potatoes at the store of the variety you like, cutting them up and planting them. Harvesting I nothing more than a shovel...

Really the only problem is, they are so easy, they can be bought dirt cheap at the store so a person is really better off growing more expensive veggies.



Yeah, I love the red potatoes common in grocery stores. I buy the organic ones and use them as seed potatoes. They are comparable in price to buying good seed potatoes too from what I've seen!

 
Steve Thorn
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Stuart Sparber wrote:Steve, I consider small tomatoes very easy and Hardy to grow.My last growing season I grew the seedlings in a tray then when Hardy I transplanted three in a coffee can.I had been collecting the 13 ounce coffee cans for a year.(we drink a lot of the stuff).I cut the bottoms off with a can opener and put the plastic lid on the cut-off  bottoms.I punched with an awl four holes in the plastic.I then filled the cans with rich soil.I poked holes and put in the Hardy young plants.All this was grown in house by a south window.When the plants were 5 inches tall Ieft the hardiest and let it grow to 10 inches.Then in my area N.Y. I dug a hole outdoors removed the plastic lid on the bottom and tamped down and the happy undisturbed root system flourished.When the lawn was mowed I spread the clippings around the tomatoes (this was May) and began clipping lower nodes and trellising.I had such an abundant and tasty crop that I had 5 gallon buckets of green tomatoes left in October.Which we made into green tomato jam with a touch of cinnamon ,allspice,sugar and hotsauce.Great for burgers!



Sounds yummy Stuart!

I'm going to plant a lot of tomatoes this year and am exited to make some homemade salsa with them hopefully!
 
Jay Angler
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Mini tomatoes are the one type I can manage to get to ripen in my climate. (I'm short on both sun and heat.) I know people who grow a variety of colours (red, yellow, orange) and shape (round and grape) and have an instant special treat to put out for guests. I try to grow a mini tomato plant in a 1/2 barrel by the front door so people can snack while waiting for me to answer - some of them look sooo... guilty when I get there and they've clearly been munching. They don't realize that's exactly why I plant them there. They are also great for drying. I cut them in half and put the cut side up on a tray and being small they dry faster than a full-sized tomato would.
 
Steve Thorn
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:Cabbage seems to be our easy grow here. Everybody loves it in every form. Probably because of the plague proportions of voles and weird molerats (not the bald ones) that decimate everything else given half a chance. And the fact that colorado beetle here is unavoidable. And wild boar. They love potatoes too. Gonna get me a gun. I love wild boar....



Mmm, I love some good cole slaw.

I haven't grown cabbage a whole lot, I need to plant some!
 
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Location: Zone 4
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Dem Krebs wrote:Hmm, it depends in your area, of course, but I find peas to be easiest. Just give them a trellis and they're happy to go until the weather gets too hot. Just so long as you keep them picked, of course.

Peas also have good germination rates and are typically pretty forgiving of poor soil and cold, damp spring weather. They're pretty pest resistant too. I had aphids on them one year, otherwise no bugs bother them here. Just powdery mildew at the end of the season.

Of course, peas will grow from the end of May until usually the end of July for me. This year they went going right through August too, though. I imagine in a hotter place, peas are a right nightmare to time correctly for new gardeners and they wouldn't find them that easy to grow.



Peas are the only thing I have not worried about growing from the first year even if I only have 2 and a half months without frost. I also have poor  soil it mostly sand and I suspect it may be some ph issues but will have to wait till I can do a few at home test. Carrots also are easy enough.
 
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Location: Coastal British Columbia
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Jay Angler wrote:Mini tomatoes are the one type I can manage to get to ripen in my climate. (I'm short on both sun and heat.) I know people who grow a variety of colours (red, yellow, orange) and shape (round and grape) and have an instant special treat to put out for guests. I try to grow a mini tomato plant in a 1/2 barrel by the front door so people can snack while waiting for me to answer - some of them look sooo... guilty when I get there and they've clearly been munching. They don't realize that's exactly why I plant them there. They are also great for drying. I cut them in half and put the cut side up on a tray and being small they dry faster than a full-sized tomato would.



Jay, I love this idea! That is hysterical that they look guilty :-) I'm going to steal this and put a cherry tom right outside my front door too!
 
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