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Easiest Vegetable to Grow

 
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
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Meg Mitchell wrote:

Ryan Hobbs wrote:

Meg Mitchell wrote:Leaf veg are probably easiest to grow, since leaves grow before flowers and fruit. Maybe chard? I spent two seasons trying to grow chard and mostly failed, then angrily threw the remainder of the seeds near my garden gate, and now there's a healthy little chard population there. If we're also looking at nontraditional veg, hosta are also pretty easy-care. They're called "shade lettuce" in some places. I haven't tried eating them yet but we do have some in our garden, leftover from the previous residents, and they grow pretty good on their own with zero maintenance.

I have had NO LUCK whatsoever with radishes or really any other root veg so far and it's starting to upset me a bit. I've gotten the 12-day radishes and I'll plant 'em out once I've gotten that perfect soil mix. But I didn't have to do that for hostas or chard!



Potatoes. Throw them down on a patch of lawn and cover with hay. It's impossible to mess it up.



We did potatoes this year and it turned out pretty well! We planted ours in January and harvested a few weeks ago for new potatoes. Next year I'll leave them in longer and see how big they get at full maturity. I like the option to plant so early. They didn't come up until awhile later when the soil warmed, but it let me spread out the garden work a bit more throughout the year. Spring is already so busy without having to fuss with potatoes.



Potatoes like cold. They sprout faster when they've been cold for a week or so.
 
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Squash, zucchini, really easy. You can also use/eat the flowers, dipped in a pancake dough and fried on both sides. Got that recipe from some nice italians, they truly know about what to do with vegetables, and they use a huge variety of veggies.
 
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Location: Michigan, USA
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William Bronson wrote:I've never grown actual rattail radishes!
I grow tillage radish,  the bootleg diakon.
They bolt plenty, but the seedpods are like spicy pea pods, so it's not a bad thing.
I throw those seeds everywhere, they frequently outgrow established starts of other plants!



"tillage radish" - are those the things that I see being used as cover crops into the winter?  I guess I never thought of them being edible.  Any words of advice or a source of info about how to prepare them, etc?  Also, I have ever heard of eating radish seeds.
 
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Thomas Dean wrote:

"tillage radish" - are those the things that I see being used as cover crops into the winter?  I guess I never thought of them being edible.  Any words of advice or a source of info about how to prepare them, etc?  Also, I have ever heard of eating radish seeds.

Technically "all parts" of diakon radish are edible. I've never eaten the actual ripe seeds, but I've added chopped leaves to stir-fries. The seed pods are also great in stir fries, but the trick is to catch them when they're large enough to be worth picking, but before they get tough or woody. The radish itself is fairly mild usually (at least in my climate). I grate it into salads, roast it along with other veggies like carrots and potatoes, dice it into soups, and it can be pickled. I try to add a little if I'm making sauerkraut, as it adds a little moisture, but my friend adds an apple instead, so it depends who's in charge that day!
 
Thomas Dean
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Jay Angler wrote:Thomas Dean wrote:

"tillage radish" - are those the things that I see being used as cover crops into the winter?  I guess I never thought of them being edible.  Any words of advice or a source of info about how to prepare them, etc?  Also, I have ever heard of eating radish seeds.

Technically "all parts" of diakon radish are edible. I've never eaten the actual ripe seeds, but I've added chopped leaves to stir-fries. The seed pods are also great in stir fries, but the trick is to catch them when they're large enough to be worth picking, but before they get tough or woody. The radish itself is fairly mild usually (at least in my climate). I grate it into salads, roast it along with other veggies like carrots and potatoes, dice it into soups, and it can be pickled. I try to add a little if I'm making sauerkraut, as it adds a little moisture, but my friend adds an apple instead, so it depends who's in charge that day!



Might be something new to try.  I looked them up since posting, turns out we grew a variety of diakon last year in the garden - "watermelon radish."  They did not do well, but the seed was old (family member who has not gardened in several years gifted us all her seeds).  Talked to my wife about it.  She didn't think it was a crazy idea, but she was skeptical of my time and internet data use to look stuff up (I have a limited amount of both at this stage in life)

Thanks!
 
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Bok choy

Easy to germinate
Cool season veggie
Fast growing
Eat young seedlings while thinning
When it bolts, young flower stalks are edible too
Attracts bees
Chicken loves it too
Plenty of seeds
Good for 2nd crop in fall
 
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