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Old fashioned substitute for the lack of women's pockets

 
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I clicked on a video today, and the following video came up in the queue. I couldn't resist watching it, and then thought I should post it here:

Now I'm thinking just what would work with my usual style. I don't wear Bernadette Banner's style, but that doesn't mean that the concept doesn't have merit. The last time I actually tried to buy a pair of ladies pants, the lack of functional pockets sent me right out of the store. Just last night I took the winter farm pants I sewed myself and added a patch pocket on the side of one leg as I need a spot for my cell phone. Then seeing this video made me wonder if something similar to the video pocket might have the advantage of being wearable with a number of different outfits. I do like Bernadette's attitude - if the fashion gurus won't give us pockets, let's make our own and make them a fashions statement!
 
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I admit up front I did not watch the video, not a video person.
I make pouches that tie around my waist, are about 7 inches long, by the width of my hips, the pocket front is about 5 inches deep (so it's easy to get into the pockets) that are segmented into sections for keeping stuff organized, and have not too tight elastic at the top of each pocket to keep the contents in and easily accessible. I don't see any good pics of them right off, the one I'm using most these days looks awful, it spends too much time on me. On my profile picture of me in a hammock you can see a black pouch at my waist.

I sew extra pockets onto all my pants and skirts, ( https://permies.com/t/92062/ungarbage/Upcycling-clothes#755660 ) but the pouches are for the things I always want, and don't want to move from outfit to outfit, and just tie on. I need to make some in other colors, I tend to default to black, which doesn't photo well, but matches my wardrobe.

Grubby pouch
 
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Thanks for sharing the video, that's interesting.

I'd like to add that sometime the ready-to-wear garments do have pockets, or more accurately, faux pockets.

They were basically sewn in the same fashion but the designer/manufacturer were just too skimpy to add a small piece of fabric for pocket bags! Or made them super shallow to be useful. I have a pair of Levi's Jean's with front pockets of merely 2 inches deep!

The the picture below is another rtw shorts with FOUR faux pockets! I took one apart and added pocket bag to make it functional.
20201115_083321.jpg
Added Pocket vs faux one
Added Pocket vs faux one
 
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I burst out laughing at the dumpster fire embroidery, and shared it with John, who did the same.

It's interesting timing, because I've actually been wearing skirts much more often lately, and have a preference for interior pockets - but like her, I don't(currently) have any that would accommodate a pocket like this, worn safely tucked away, under it. For now, I've just been adding them to my skirts, but have also been giving thought to making some to work with this type. Tying one would create more bulk than I'd be happy with, but it would still work with a buckled belt, or snaps, buttons, or hooks and eyes. I detest velcro on my clothing, but others may be fine with that. The advantage of the ties is the almost infinitely adjustable size, though. Extra of any of the other options, similarly to the familiar bra hook, would help - but would still be limited. I dunno.
 
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Carla Burke wrote:Tying one would create more bulk than I'd be happy with, but it would still work with a buckled belt, or snaps, buttons, or hooks and eyes. I detest velcro on my clothing, but others may be fine with that. The advantage of the ties is the almost infinitely adjustable size, though. Extra of any of the other options, similarly to the familiar bra hook, would help - but would still be limited. I dunno.

All good thoughts Carla! Yes, the tie Bernadette used is more "era appropriate" but I'm not in the 18th Cent. and the item that's giving me grief is a 3 1/2" x 6 1/2" cell phone that Hubby bought me. (In all fairness to Hubby, I told him I wouldn't carry a cell phone unless it had a *really* good camera in it - this one does.) My farm pants hip pockets are deep enough to hold it, but when I try to bend my hip up, it interferes. My coat pocket is large enough also, but it's low down and tends to get bashed. Your idea made me think of the gun holders that strap to the waist and around the leg - a pocket made in that style would work with pants, but wouldn't work with dresses.

Making it adjustable is helpful in my climate as I tend to layer a *lot* in winter - it isn't that cold, but it's damp and wet, and it's cool in the shade, but if I end up in the sun, suddenly I'm overheating and need to remove layers. Lately, I'm up to 5 layers to start, and often ditching 2 of them half-way through my chores.

So - buckled belt - yes! I've save some nice buckles from worn belts, so maybe I can even make one that suits.
Snaps - that's a no for this use as I'd be afraid I'd catch it and the snap would let go and drop it into a duckie bucket - my cell phone can't swim.  ;-)
Buttons - yes! Multiple button holes and a pair of large sturdy buttons on a fairly thick strap might do nicely.
Hooks and eyes - Maybe - I'd want to use large ones, not wimpy typical dress-maker's ones - but that makes me think of those plastic clips that some back-packs have on them which I salvage when people wear out the pack - adjustable, not too bulky, "plastic" - but I'm willing to give re-used plastic a passing grade.
Velcro - I *totally* agree - I remove it from clothing as it gets filled with fibers and wears out and doesn't wash well. For things like my mom's foot brace, it has its place, but not on my pocket.

 
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Jay Angler: I put thigh pockets on my pants, and on my skirts. Skirts are a hair weird, since I wear full ones, and my phone can get a lot of swing to it, but I still put them on. I won't put it in hip pockets, I got REALLY fast with the itty screwdrivers and rice before I started putting phone pockets in.
The bit about put a bit of elastic on the top edge of the pocket is worth it's weight in gold on phone pockets. Nothing like watching your phone go off the tractor or mower... Wasn't mine, but I saw one go off a skidsteer, was in his pocket. I'm more careful than him.

Edit: I NEVER carry my phone in my pouch, it's too close to my girl parts. If I was going to do that, I'd make a longer one, pretty much an apron, and that would swing even worse than a skirt...
 
Carla Burke
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Jay Angler wrote:All good thoughts Carla! Yes, the tie Bernadette used is more "era appropriate" but I'm not in the 18th Cent. and the item that's giving me grief is a 3 1/2" x 6 1/2" cell phone that Hubby bought me. (In all fairness to Hubby, I told him I wouldn't carry a cell phone unless it had a *really* good camera in it - this one does.) My farm pants hip pockets are deep enough to hold it, but when I try to bend my hip up, it interferes. My coat pocket is large enough also, but it's low down and tends to get bashed. Your idea made me think of the gun holders that strap to the waist and around the leg - a pocket made in that style would work with pants, but wouldn't work with dresses.

Making it adjustable is helpful in my climate as I tend to layer a *lot* in winter - it isn't that cold, but it's damp and wet, and it's cool in the shade, but if I end up in the sun, suddenly I'm overheating and need to remove layers. Lately, I'm up to 5 layers to start, and often ditching 2 of them half-way through my chores.

So - buckled belt - yes! I've save some nice buckles from worn belts, so maybe I can even make one that suits.
Snaps - that's a no for this use as I'd be afraid I'd catch it and the snap would let go and drop it into a duckie bucket - my cell phone can't swim.  ;-)
Buttons - yes! Multiple button holes and a pair of large sturdy buttons on a fairly thick strap might do nicely.
Hooks and eyes - Maybe - I'd want to use large ones, not wimpy typical dress-maker's ones - but that makes me think of those plastic clips that some back-packs have on them which I salvage when people wear out the pack - adjustable, not too bulky, "plastic" - but I'm willing to give re-used plastic a passing grade.
Velcro - I *totally* agree - I remove it from clothing as it gets filled with fibers and wears out and doesn't wash well. For things like my mom's foot brace, it has its place, but not on my pocket.



Bikers (motorcyclists) also often wear a similar leg-strapped bag - and I have one. I love it for biking, but frankly, it's a 'pita' otherwise, because not only does it not work with skirts & dresses, it's also a serious detriment to getting to the bathroom, quickly - something I often have to accomplish, when I'm working outside. I tend to push too long, trying to get stuff done, then when I finally give in to the call of nature, I've a battle with an extra layer, because that style doesn't just easily go up and down with your pants. The belt (at least on mine) doesn't work with all my belt loops, because of the shape, and even if it did, it's weight would pull it down and out of them. While it's great for riding, and has a nice capacity, it's pretty much single purpose, and I wish I'd gone with the other option, and plan to, next year. That was something of a pocketed leather belt.

In the meantime, a rather boho-style 'festival belt' is what I'm going to make. I do wear dresses and skirts, often. Many have no pockets (those are slowly being removed from service, and repurposed or donated!) I wanted something easy on and off, with loops for attaching things to (like Charlie's leash, poop bags, and treats), and a plethora of pockets, of course. This next idea actually came to me as I was cutting up dead jeans last week. I came across a few waistbands, with the rear yokes, zippers, and some of the pockets still intact. They reminded me of some of the festival belts I'd seen on pinterest, and I'm going to use them that way. With the zippers removed, and more & bigger pockets and maybe some fun embellishments added, I think they will serve my purposes, beautifully. Once I get at least 1 done, I'll put up pics. The trick, of course, is waistbands that will already comfortably fit will be the easiest to work with. Since these will not be holding up my clothes, I can play with where they sit on my body. As long as they're not too tight & binding on my waist, or so loose they fall off my hips, they'll serve my purposes, and(I hope) will manage to look cute over my dresses and skirts - and even my leggings, shorts, and if they're particularly loose, possibly over my jeans. But, over jeans, it would be easy to end up being uncomfortably bulky, too.
 
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I saw that pocket video too!

I wish I could afford the dumpster fire kit.  But maybe I could learn to embroider something like "2020, the year the introverts won!"

Putting that project on my wish list.  It would be a great way to use up some fabric cabbage.  
 
Jay Angler
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r ranson wrote:

But maybe I could learn to embroider something like "2020, the year the introverts won!"

Yes, an excellent motto! I think I'd go for, "A REAL pocket for a REAL lifestyle". Maybe the "real" words would just be a bold colour, but not all caps, as I know that can seem like yelling on the internet.

Carla Burke wrote:

Bikers (motorcyclists) also often wear a similar leg-strapped bag - and I have one. I love it for biking, but frankly, it's a 'pita' otherwise, because not only does it not work with skirts & dresses, it's also a serious detriment to getting to the bathroom, quickly - something I often have to accomplish, when I'm working outside.

Excellent point! Our field is a looonnnngggg... way from the house, so I just added a bucket and tp can to the goose shelter which a friend has already tested.

This is the pocket I added to my winter farm rain pants:
farm-pants-pocket.JPG
I can actually get my phone out now before it stops ringing!
I can actually get my phone out now before it stops ringing!
 
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I guess I am the "old man with bad taste" in the room. I thought about this for a while and realized that the easiest, best solution was a fanny pack. Now my husband (another old man with bad taste, when he is on his motorcycle he tends to need more pockets than even men's clothes have) and I fight over my old fanny pack and we have a few (that are not as good as the original one) floating around.
We've seen them go in and out of style at least 3 times since I bought the first darn fanny pack at a street fair in Tokyo in the 90s when I got tired of having to carry a backpack because my !$(¨%&$* clothes had no pockets....
Yes, no taste and no shame.
 
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My mom is impossible to shop for, hates pockets, purses, fanny packs, and not having her stuff with her. Running out of choices there mom!
We saw this someplace and bought her one, it works well for her when she feels she must carry something.
Big 7 pocket Waist pack
 
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@ Tereza - not at all - I use a fanny pack as my purse when I'm out, but it's too heavy/bulky to do farm stuff in. They have their place. I'd loose a purse in a heart beat!

@ Pearl - exactly what's been percolating in the back of my mind! It's on the outside of the hips so doesn't interfere if I need to squat or bend over to clean a duckie bucket, but having a section on each side would balance the load!

What I'm thinking I'll try first, is a longer version of the picture Pearl posted so that the cell pocket is just covered by the hem of my farm coat. My current issue is that my cell hangs up fast (don't know why and the house techies can't fix it) so by the time I get the coat hem high enough to access the original pocket, I've missed the call (that's on top of the fact that if it's in that pocket, it interferes with hip movement.)

At one point I bought a leather carpenters belt thinking it would work for gardening, but same issues as a fanny pack - it's in the way. Waist held, but hanging down the outsides of my legs is worth a try, unless someone's got any feedback from a similar experiment?
 
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I tried wearing a belt with several interchangeable pockets (during a bicycle trip; pockets I made for: keys, knife, bidon and one for other small stuff). It felt annoying. So I decided: my clothes need to have real pockets!
If I can't find them, I'll sew my own pants, coats, etc. with pockets! At the moment I am knitting a 'garden jacket' with pockets.  
 
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I made this upcycling project a few years ago for my sewing courses. But now I use it in the garden...
It was only a pair of really old and damaged jeans. I used the back pocket and sewed it under the front pocket. Be careful not to stitch the front pocket together...
 
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Verena Tue wrote:...

I made this upcycling project a few years ago for my sewing courses. But now I use it in the garden...
It was only a pair of really old and damaged jeans. I used the back pocket and sewed it under the front pocket. Be careful not to stitch the front pocket together...


Hi Verena. I like such jeans-pocket things ... but I don't like wearing one. I made something similar to hang on (a wall, a chair, I still have to decide) to put stuff in.
 
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When I think of all the tools I’ve laid down in the garden or pasture when we were working on projects, never to be found until a year or so later when they were rusted and useless....all because of a lack of pockets.  My Grandmother used to wear an apron in the garden, with big pockets in it, and if the pockets were not enough I’ve seen her gather up the entire apron and fill it full of fruit or veggies.  Way overdue to bring back pockets for women, especially us homesteaders.  
 
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Faye Streiff wrote:When I think of all the tools I’ve laid down in the garden or pasture when we were working on projects, never to be found until a year or so later when they were rusted and useless....


Not related to pockets, but I paint all my tools hot pink. I got tired of trying to find them. Not my first choice of color (I'd rather they were purple) but most visible against the grass and dirt.
 
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Faye Streiff wrote:When I think of all the tools I’ve laid down in the garden or pasture when we were working on projects, never to be found until a year or so later when they were rusted and useless....all because of a lack of pockets.  My Grandmother used to wear an apron in the garden, with big pockets in it, and if the pockets were not enough I’ve seen her gather up the entire apron and fill it full of fruit or veggies.  Way overdue to bring back pockets for women, especially us homesteaders.  


I wear an apron when working in the kitchen (yes, I am a grandmother). Maybe a special garden-apron would be a good idea. Made out of sturdy cotton, linen or hemp fabric. With several pockets in the right sizes for the small garden tools.
 
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I refuse to buy pants/jeans that don't have good pockets.  I am female, 57 years old.  I do not carry a purse. I do not wear skirts. The heck with skirts. I have been riding horses since I was 5 which is when I got my first pony. Had my first horse when I was 8. I still have horses. I also have cattle, goats, pigs, chickens, and rabbits and dogs. I sometimes have other critters. I can just imagine goats getting up inside a skirt.  Not for me.  I stopped carrying a purse when I left my purse in a movie theater after a date in high school. I carry a wallet.  I also carry a pocket knife my mom got me my first one when I was 8.. I only recently moved up to a smart phone and I miss my nice small flip phone, sigh.  I think I am going to have to stick to the smart phone though.  I have always been a tomboy type and I got tired in grade school of boys looking up my skirt on the monkey bars. The heck with it. I haven't worn a skirt in 20 years and I don't freaking miss it.  To each their own. I have been happily married to my husband for over 33 years.  If you want to wear a skirt, that is fine, but I don't think they work well when I am cutting wood or sorting goats, or riding horses.  

So back to taking your wallet or cell phone with you.  Make sure that wallet or cell phone fits in the pockets of the pants you buy. Lately, I have found it worth it to buy the fire hose flex pants from Dululth Trading.  They have pockets with pockets in them. I mean it. Therear hip pocket on the right hip has a pocket with a zipper pocket that fits my wallet and that pocket has a pocket on the outside of it. The other rear hip has a pocket with zipper.  There is a cell phone pocket, but find it doesn't work well when I am driving the tractor or my one ton truck so I put my cell phone in the thigh pocket. There is a thigh pocket on either side in addition to the cell phone pocket on the right leg. The thigh pockets have pockets in them too. I have never run out of pockets for doing normal stuff around the farm.  I don't carry my wallet while working on the farm only when I go to town. The fire hose flex pants look good enough for town. I wear them to a lot of places including restaurants. Now when I am building stuff, I put on a carpenter tool thingy my husband bought for me that has the suspender straps because I hate tight belts.  I wear shorts once it gets over 68 degrees. I have a pair of the fire hose flex shorts but usually wear mens  basketball shorts around the farm  as they breathe better and they hold the cell phone and my pocket knife.  My first pair of fire hose flex pants are going on year three. This makes them worth it especially if you can find a good coupon since the jeans I was getting before at TSC and Walmart were only lasting 6 months and the pockets sucked.  With those zippered pockets I don't have the fear of losing my wallet in the porta john at the local livestock auction. Everyone has phobias and that is one of mine.   The duluth trading shorts don't have zippered hip pockets but they do have velcro so they are pretty secure.  For a while, I was able to buy of all things Gloria Vanderbuilt pants at Costco that had really nice pockets that would hold a wallet, but I don't think they sell them anymore especially since they were only $14 each. I haven't managed to wear any of those out and I wore them for several years. I still have them but stopped wearing them when I got the Duluth Trading Firehose flex pants as the pockets were even better.    

And make sure that the front pockets will hold your keys and pocket knife.  It sucks when you lose your pocket knife. I don't leave home without mine.  

I have bought mens shorts and had them fit okay. I can sew so if I need to I can take in a waist that is too big so the pants still fit in the hips. But I don't have to do that with the fire hose flex pants since I can get them in women's sizes.  quite the relief. One less thing to do...

So if you can afford it I would suggest the Firehose Flex pants. While they seem pricey up front, they are tough and last quite a while.  And they seem to shed dirt really easily so you don't have to wash them that often and they still look good.

Bonnie
 
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I forgot to add this bit.

Friend of mine, Connie, once asked me when I visiting her where I found sweatpants with pockets.  My reply, "The men's section at Walmart." { And that is where I get my basket ball shorts and my lightweight breathable shirts too}. And they last longer than the women's sweat pants.  I stopped paying the pink tax.  I buy men's socks because they last longer and cost less.  I usually get them at COSTCO now. THey have lightweight mens socks for summer and for winter they have these nice 70 percent merino wool socks that last several years.  Heck Sweat pants are sweat pants. they aren't a fashion statement. But is is awesome to have pockets in your nice comfy sweat pants so you can carry your cell phone and pocket knife with you when you go out at night to lock up the chickens and check on the goats. Then you can take a picture of the goat with your cell phone to send to your friends to show how your goats once again attempted to commit suicide and then you can use the pocket knife to cut the goat out of whatever they got stuck in.  My goats are continually coming up with new unusual ways to try and off themselves. I think they keep score.

Bonnie

PS. I don't wear my sweat pants to Walmart I only buy them there.
 
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Hi Bonnie. Those Fire Hose Pants look really great! But I don't want to order them from overseas. It's a pity they aren't sold here.
 
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I just remembered this.  I used to do endurance riding. You don't get a lot of pockets when you wear riding tights.  Everyone was wanting pockets but not everyone wanted to wear a small backpack or a fanny pack. Many people took to wearing fishing vests.  Fishing vest have all kinds of pockets.  People wore them especially on rides where they were really far from a possible rescue in case they got tossed off their horse.  The pockets enabled them to carry a pocket knife, an emergency blanket, a lighter or matches, some energy bars and a bottle of water along with other emergency supplies like ibuprofen and benedryl bandages and vet wrap and what not.    I imagine you could wear a fishing vest over your shirt if you were wearing a skirt and have a multitude of pockets.  Fishing vest are usually light weight often with parts made of mesh so it wouldn't heat you up too much.  

hope it might help.
bonnie
 
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A fishing vest sounds absolutely brilliant.

If you want a BIG pocket up front for harvesting, foraging or gathering of mulch, etc. I like the roo gardening apron.

https://permies.com/t/47911/Roo-Gardening-Apron


Shameless pic of my daughter wearing the one I sent her, using the front pouch to hold some of her cucumber starts so she has a hand free carry wine into her garden!


Also, because I think it's funny and ridiculous, and sort of, maybe, could be modified for something more practical, there is such a thing as a teacup holster.


(source on Etsy)

 
pollinator
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I love your fishing vest idea, Bonnie! I've been thinking of getting one. Hubby wears them all the time, in summer and winter weights because he has to have a zillion pockets. I'm also thinking to make myself a couple of aprons with plenty of pockets - either buttoned or zippered. One for indoors work and one for outdoors.

LOLing at myself for not noticing what the embroidery on Jay's original post was saying. I just admired the fine work the embroiderer did. Had to go back for a second look when comments mentioned the dumpster fire!
 
Pearl Sutton
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I pocketed up a vest Upcycling clothes!
It had a lot, but I wanted more. :D
 
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I love Bernadette's videos in general, and this is on my list of things to make - with some modifications. I tend to wear pants a lot more than skirts, and I feel like this particular design would flop around a lot over pants. So when I get around to making it, I'm going to try making it a little less curved and add a second tie at the bottom to tie around my thigh. I don't know how well it's going to work, and the pattern may need adapting so it will work with a lot of bending, but I have a lot of scrap fabric to experiment with!
 
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Woodworkers use tool aprons that may be just what you are looking for.  They come in all different styles and weights for different season and purposes.  Also, some carpenters use vests instead of belts.  You may want to check those out.  There are some really nice (and expensive) ones made in USA.  Many are, of course, made overseas.  I'm a carpenter/woodworker and I like a tool belt and I've used a belt in the garden as well, but it is not as great when on hands and knees.  Chest pockets and even some tool belt-type pockets dump their contents when on hands and knees.  I like the vest or apron with pockets around the waist when working on the ground.  I prefer the vest as it holds the pocket against your body instead of letting in dangle as an apron tends to do.  Anything extra on my upper body is horrible in hot weather though.

Another one to consider for specific tasks are the small pouches you can find at the hardware store that have a flap that tucks into a back pocket of jeans so it hangs there at easy reach and would work for gardening as long as you're not trying to sit.  

Just a few more ideas from a guy with many large pockets in all his pants.
 
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If you want to experience true pocket luxury, try on a surveyors construction vest.

I  have at various points gotten to borrow a surveyors safety vest and they are fantasticn after a life of 2" or "decorative" womens pockets. I have honestly considered buying one just for gardening. You can fit unfolded letter sized papers in the back, a small book, camera, cellphone, pens, tape measures, hand tools, carabinnered on things, a hammer in the back pocket, stakes.. . and it's kinda like a tiny backpack (whole back is a pouch) that also has front pockets and is easily removable so you don't have to add things back every time you go out. Zippers and velcro.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B01MT6DDDG/ref=sspa_mw_detail_0?ie=UTF8&psc=1 this one, I believe, has TWELVE fully functional pockets, including one that is the whole back panel.
 
Carla Burke
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All this about vests is true - incredible pocket potential. But, not always (in my case, almost never) practical. They add too much bulk on the upper body, for my needs. I have a light, streamlined hunting/ tactical vest, and it's still a pita. Other than hiking or hunting, I have to take it off, to get anything done. That defeats the purpose, for me. It's not just about how much can I carry - I mean... backpacks. But, cooking, sewing, gardening, cleaning, woodworking, taking care of our livestock, daily living... Just, not going to work, for me. I think the tie-on pocket makes more sense, for my purposes. I can always make several pockets to switch out, depending on what I'm doing. One in the sewing room, one in the kitchen, one at the goat stanchion, etc.
 
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Love Bernadette's videos! Just popped in to say - for those looking for an alternative to tying but still wanting flexibility in sizing (or wanting to avoid snaps, velcro, etc.), you could use two O-rings or D-rings to make a cinchable belt like this:
 
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When I stand to attention, my middle finger tips touch the outer seam of my trousers. Right at that spot I open up the seam about an inch and a quarter. There is usually extra fabric inside and when I sew that up into a sheath, my mechanical pencil fits splendidly. So just by casually brushing my thigh, I already have a writing instrument in hand ready to take notes. And for the other thigh, one of those click-to-expose-tip ballpoint pens. Unlike a shirt pocket, you can run and not have them fall out in the middle of a road crossing. Has anyone tried Lara Croft style smartphone holsters strapped to your favourite leg?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Edward Lye wrote:When I stand to attention, my middle finger tips touch the outer seam of my trousers. Right at that spot I open up the seam about an inch and a quarter.
...
Has anyone tried Lara Croft style smartphone holsters strapped to your favourite leg?


I sew a phone pocket an one side at that height, and a pocket for the hand fans I carry on the other side.
Never tried strapping something there, I doubt I'd be able to, I sometimes wear double knee braces and end up having to use over the shoulder suspenders to make them stay in place, I'd have to do something similar to make anything stay on my thighs without being sewn.

Ooh edit my response... I looked up the visual, they hook it off  the belt primary, and around the thigh secondary. Interesting!




 
Carla Burke
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I like the one with the clips! I don't/ can't always wear a real belt, but with clips, it would work with belt loops or a tied-on belt, or even just a long shoelace!
 
pollinator
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A good old "waitress" apron is my "go to". Simple square, folded almost in half, with seams sewn bottom to top to create pockets. Top portion can be made into a tie on or folded over to create a sleeve so it can slide onto an existing belt. I also just got a wicked leather "welders apron" for when I deal with critters that shred my clothes.

Another option is a good old "safety vest" - those bright orange vests with reflective strips - they are lightweight often mesh, and many now have pockets, particularly for phones/wallets, pens etc. They are "one size fits all" type velcro adjustable sides, and heck, you will be safe from hunters while gardening; and easily "found" in case of accident.

As to phones, wallets and purses...hate 'em all! I keep my phone in a waterproof clear "vinyl" pouch on a lanyard. It also houses cash and plastic for purchases, and a ring for the car house key, car key/remote. I love the ones by MPOW off Amazon. For ten bucks my phone and wallet in one unit that is dirt and water proof.

As an aside, if you are prone to losing your cell invest in an earpiece - this means handsfree calling/answering, yes, but it also means if you get further than 30 feet from the phone it alerts you that "you are no longer connected". My newest is a Plantronic 80 off Amazon.ca for $30 - cheap insurance to NOT lose or damage the phone.

Back to the original topic: getting the deck and porch roofs finished, then building the sliding bug screens that are replaced with clear "vinyl" screens to winterproof these areas; lastly getting the 20 ft shed built, secured and lit.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Here's the 'Garden Jacket with pockets' I knitted. The pockets are sewn in and made out of cotton fabric.

the inside, so you can see the pockets

wearing it and showing one of the pockets

Btw I made the sleeves that short on purpose, otherwise they become dirty when I work in the garden.
 
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This is an epic thread. I have bemoaned the lack of pockets on women’s clothes for sooooo long. Also, the lack of warmth in women’s sweaters whereas a men’s sweater at the same price point will be so much warmer.

For those that like the idea of fanny packs, but not the bulk hanging round the front, try swinging it round and wearing it in the back. I’m a runner and our running belts, which are essentially glorified fanny packs, feel much more comfortable to me with the weight resting in the small of the back rather than at the front.

I love combat trousers for all the pockets. I know it was a 90’s trend but I still love that vibe. Also they sell them still, only in special ‘work wear’ shops. For those who don’t like the trousers, then yes, fishing vests are a good idea, if only in the garden where no one can see you.

There are Roo aprons, as someone mentioned. Never used one myself, but heard about them from my fave gardening youtuber (Jess @ Roots & Refuge Farm).

I used to love my little ‘waitress’ apron that I wore when I worked at a florists. Only prob was, when I bent over, stuff could fall out easily. Like my phone. - right into a bucket of water....you live and learn lol 😂. Still, if you’re crafty then I guess you could add a drawstring to the top, or a zip or something.

For everyday wear, I try to always wear or carry a jacket with zipped pockets for essentials. I can always tie it round my waist if I get too hot. I’ve seen women showing things down their bra when on a night out. Wouldn’t be my preferred choice, but it could work as a last resort, especially if wearing a sports type bra.

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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My 'Garden Apron' with pockets. More on it in the 'upcycling' thread ...
 
Jay Angler
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We're in the worst heat wave I've experienced in BC, so I went hunting through my drawers for shorts that were loose enough to feel cooler than my usual farm gear. No idea where they came from - I think hand-me-down from my kid, but possibly given to him as I don't remember ever buying them. Either way, the "cargo pockets" were at a goofy angle that made them difficult to put stuff in, and when I sat down, they were inclined to dump stuff out. So today I unpicked them, rotated them to vertical, moved them a little towards the front for easier reach, pinned them on and stitched them on the machine. I tested them at Duckie bedtime, and what a difference! Yippeee! Cell phone fit in one side, and the extra egg I found in the duck run was safe in the other, along with my work gloves which I always take in case I have to grab a Muscovy (which I indeed needed to this evening - they've got dangerously sharp claws for climbing trees.) Such a simple fix, so here are pictures to inspire people to make their clothes suit their needs despite what the fashionistas do.
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