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Harvesting seeds from your groceries

 
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How many of you have sprouted an Avocado seed? That’s right, everyone has but have you ever tasted the fruit from a Haas Avocado grown from seed? I had the great pleasure to visit a friend in South Florida who offered me a sample of the first official fruit from a seed he planted 7 or 8 years ago. Taste? Worst tasting avocado with a bitter aftertaste. After asking a Horticulture expert a few weeks later, he laughed and said NO avocado seed produces a genetic copy of the parent tree and only a tree grafted with a Haas, or other, scion guarantees a match.

Moral of the story: Keep on encouraging the kids to sprout the seeds but only grafted trees will produce the stuff great Guacamole is made from...
 
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My Father would use dry beans from the store & they worked just fine.
All seeds on today market are hybridized, Europe & USA have been hybridizing seeds for three hundred years.
The book "Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding" tells the story of how man has  manipulated plants for hundreds of years.
https://www.amazon.com/Hybrid-History-Science-Plant-Breeding/dp/0226437132
 
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I have always gotten my bean seeds at the grocery store. They have great varieties and way cheaper than the one sold for growing
 
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Location: Garner, NC, USA
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I have found that at the Haas avacados that I prefer do not over winter in Raleigh, NC.
 
Posts: 150
Location: Washington DC area (zone 7a)
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Do any avocados over winter in Raleigh?  You might be able to keep them over winter if you baby them by pulling a plastic sheet or blankets over them over winter.  I was able to keep most of our garden alive during the ice storm by erecting a low-tunnel over it, and placing a small heater inside.
 
Posts: 55
Location: Piedmont, NC
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forest garden homestead
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I've a number of cabbage stems placed in the garden that have overwintered and been as effective (if not more so) than seed grown.
 
Ebo David
Posts: 150
Location: Washington DC area (zone 7a)
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In the master gardeners classes I had taken they specifically warn against re-sprouting plants from the grocery store -- due to pathogens and diseases.  I am not sure what they would say about seeds from fruit (as long as the were not exposed to the air, handling or equipment).
 
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Location: NW Michigan
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I have some apple seedlings, one pear seedling, and several green onions on my windowsill at work from organic grocery store produce. I had the seeds in the refrigerator in a moist paper towel at work for 6-8 weeks before planting out. Several of the seedlings did not make it because they dried out when I went on one of my 10-day trips for work, others have been given out to coworkers, and I plan to plant a few out myself.

I also like to plant out and mulch seeds from my lunch if I find a good spot for them while I am working in the field.
 
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foraging medical herbs sheep
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If you save the bottom around the root core of a tasty onion and set it in a shallow container of water (I use the glass gobs from vases) it will begin growing roots. Once there are roots I plant the roots in a good potting mix with the little onion chunk above the soil line. I have had great success with them forming bulbs that can then be planted out in spring.
 
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These things may have been already said:

1)Peppers and squashes often have mature seeds in them  Tomatoes, many veg you buy at the grocery store has viable seeds in it.

When I core a bell pepper sometimes I dry the core(the stem area with the seeds) on top of my refrigerator.

When I was growing "pickling" cucumbers they grew way bigger than regular cucumbers and the skin went yellow and they got really big and bitter.

After TASTNG THE OLD ONES.



I put them on the compost pile.

And pickling cucumber vines grew.

Now I have a berm I put things on/in I don't want to use right now in the food forest.

Most of the veg you buy at the grocery store has potential to have viable seeds.

The veg you grow, always let some pants live the entire life cycle.

If you miss out on the seeds they make, if you remember where they were......you can propagate by spreading the dirt.




 
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Location: A NorCal clay & rock valley
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I do a bit of seed saving from good watermelons and squash. I like to regrow green onions too after hacking the tops off.

Right now I've got 2 varieties of saved melon seeds growing. Wait I lied. I have 3 because the Hammies are a melon too! Hopefully they'll get there unlike last year well.. because bears.
 
Saralee Couchoud
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I think if you live where it's to cold you can grow them in a pot and keep them as a house plant. Just keep them pruned
 
pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: Oregon zone 8b
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kids forest garden fungi books wofati cooking
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I've tried flax and chickpeas for the first time this year. I plan on trying beans next. Lots of beans.

Here are chickpeas.



I've also managed to root a few lemongrass cuttings from the store and they're doing well in pots for now.





 
pioneer
Posts: 154
Location: Michigan - Zone 6a
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hugelkultur urban books ungarbage
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I had a honeydew melon, so I buried the rinds as fertilizer and planted the seeds on top. I went out today to check on them and found that a slug munching on them, but otherwise they seem fine.
photo_2021-06-14_19-25-21.jpg
[Thumbnail for photo_2021-06-14_19-25-21.jpg]
 
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I hope I win a copy of your book. I did not buy many seeds for this year and have had mixed results. I have saved a line of patty pan squash I bought 10 years ago and all I do now is place some that have gone over in a part of the garden I want them  the next year and get volunteers every year without much visible hybridizong!

I saved cukes and okra and saved seed, which sprouted but then died. Mixed results with tomatoes (but hit with very cold weather) No peppers sprouted at all but eggplant and ground cherries did great!

My pink and blue tomatoes (store bought) all came up beautifully but NONE of the russets.

I am interested in reading about your brand because I have saved the same three varieties for years and have seen no mixing!

Thanks!
 
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Last year I grew some ginger in my cold frame. This year I planted some, but it hasn't come up yet. I don't think it's going to, because it's been a long time. It was incredibly easy and I got some new ginger root to use in my cooking. Its provenance was the grocery story. Your post makes me want to try again.

Oh, and I grew some grocery story flax.

If I ever get more organized I'll keep notes, but mostly, I just plant, plant, plant....
 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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Ellen Schwindt wrote:Last year I grew some ginger in my cold frame. This year I planted some, but it hasn't come up yet.


Ellen, I know I'm not the only one here who's been surprised to see that ginger takes its sweet time and comes up when it pleases. Keep an eye on it and you might get a pleasant surprise.
 
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Love this. All my winter squash plants are from grocery squash. Last year i grew a bunch of the little snacking pepper seeds, ate lots of,"free" peppers, gave lots of plants away to friends. One friend put 2 of them in attractive pots and gave them to her grandkids for Christmas covered in sweet, red, kid-sized peppers
 
Saralee Couchoud
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My kids think am crazy, they're probably right. Everything I buy I save seeds from. When I buy meat, I wash the Styrofoam trays and put a paper towel in them to put seeds on to dry. Also the plastic trays the little meals my husband eats when I'm not there work good for this. They also stack well if you have to pick them up off the table when company comes. I have even been know to save a few seeds from a tomato that tasted good at a restaurant, wrap them up in a napkin and smuggle them home. Yeah, I guess I am crazy
 
Posts: 73
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Tomatoes I find very satisfying to save 'n' trade seeds. You can start with some extra-tasty ones. Just spread a bit of the seedy pulp onto a piece of paper and let them dry out. You can then scrape them off and keep in a paper envelope until seed starting season. It get's more interesting starting the coming year: save fruit from the best (flavor, earliness, disease resistance, drought or cold tolerance....whatever the challenges may be in your own garden). Save that seed again and use it the next year. Note the plants that show the traits you're looking to develop, save their seeds, and keep on that way for a few years and *presto* (pesto?) you will quickly have your very own landrace.

Works for other plants and livestock as well, but I find tomatoes particularly satisfying.

bluematos.jpg
This is an F2 (2nd generation) of blue tomato growing in the Netherlands, that I first tasted in Barcelona. Growing out the F3 (3rd generation) from saved seed this year.So far, plants are blooming earlier and look even stronger than last summer.
This is an F2 (2nd generation) of blue tomato growing in the Netherlands, that I first tasted in Barcelona. Growing out the F3 (3rd generation) from saved seed this year.So far, plants are blooming earlier and look even stronger than last summer.
 
J.B. Iler
pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: Oregon zone 8b
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A month after my post of the chickpeas, and record heat and drought in the PNW. Here's an update.



Here's a few cracked open. The pods had quite a bit of empty space, and rattled when shaken. Pods carried 0-3 seeds, most had 1 or 2.



I tried crunching them into the bowl to remove pods. I eventually shelled them individually into separate bowls. It was satisfying to do while watching TV.


So this was a fun experiment. I'll grow some of the ones I harvested. I might try sprouting some too.
 
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