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Hobbit snack food?

 
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What kind of tasty treat would a hobbit (Lord of the Rings style) eat with a cuppa tea for say, the snack break between Elevenses and Luncheon?  
 
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I consulted with my other half, who was born and spent his early childhood in the shires, and we decided that most days a garibaldi biscuit or three would probably suffice.

Special days may warrant an Eccles cake instead.

Or maybe as well...
 
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If I were a hobbit, I would have chocolate chip cookies or Petit Fours.

I got the Petit Four for Mother's Day.
 
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tea cakes, some cheese, some cured meat, a bit of fruit….

i get the impression they like a good ‘spread’.
 
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John says, "Cucumber sandwiches, salmon & cream cheese sandwiches, toast points, Avocado toast, toad-in-the-hole... bacon. Oh! And a short beer, to wash it all down!"
 
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I have to agree with Carla and Greg, I think most "snacks" for a hobbit would suffice for a meal. If I were a hobbit, I would want a good loaf of crusty bread and cheese and maybe pick an apple from a nearby orchard to give me the energy to last the long hour till Luncheon. Perhaps I would wash it down with cold water or fresh milk if I had it on hand.
 
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I finally got a chance to look them up.

Are garibaldi's like fly biskets?  (flat chrispy sweet crackers that have squshed raisins in them so they look like smooshed flies?).  I don't know what the English is as we can only find them in China Town (no English on the packaging) and that's what they were called by my family in the 1940s when they could get them last.  
 
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Onion ring to rule them all!

Second breakfast quiche

Po-tay-to skins

Anything made by hillSHIRE

But if you're dedicated check this out

http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/other/recipes.html
 
Burra Maluca
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r ranson wrote:
Are garibaldi's like fly biskets?  (flat chrispy sweet crackers that have squshed raisins in them so they look like smooshed flies?).  I don't know what the English is as we can only find them in China Town (no English on the packaging) and that's what they were called by my family in the 1940s when they could get them last.  



That's them!  

Grown ups call them garibaldis. Kids call them squashed fly biscuits.

Eccles cakes are a bit like the luxury version, ideally served with Lancashire cheese.



https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2017/feb/23/how-to-make-the-perfect-eccles-cakes
 
 
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Clay Bunch wrote:Onion ring to rule them all!


And just like that my mind spun away with memories of wearing onion rings on my fingers and thinking I was cool. And trying to continue the rhyme in my head "Onion ring to find them ...." just didn't sound right,

Clay Bunch wrote:http://lotrscrapbook.bookloaf.net/other/recipes.html


My new favorite nibble site! Thank you for sharing!

Hobbits would probably enjoy a light snack of bread and cheese. And fruit, whatever happens to be in season. And maybe a bit of ale in case the bread is dry. With tea, of course, which means you have to have milk and honey. And if you have milk and honey, you may as well add hardboiled eggs, and some mustard. Or a couple of types of mustard, because not everyone likes the same kind. And some butter for the bread. And ...
It's a light snack, after all. Just a nibble, really.
 
Carla Burke
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Kristine Keeney wrote:
Hobbits would probably enjoy a light snack of bread and cheese. And fruit, whatever happens to be in season. And maybe a bit of ale in case the bread is dry. With tea, of course, which means you have to have milk and honey. And if you have milk and honey, you may as well add hardboiled eggs, and some mustard. Or a couple of types of mustard, because not everyone likes the same kind. And some butter for the bread. And ...
It's a light snack, after all. Just a nibble, really.



John says,"GASP! Mustard with out ham? Are we on punishment?"
 
Kristine Keeney
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Carla Burke wrote:John says,"GASP! Mustard with out ham? Are we on punishment?"



If you're going to add ham to your offerings, you might as well add a little of last night's baked chicken, too. Or a nice plate of sliced cooked beef.
Since we aren't sure who's going to show up for tea, having all three isn't a bad choice. You want to make sure everyone can have a bite.

And maybe sone veggie sticks of some sort, depending on what's seasonal for you. Radishes and carrots are in season here, but some cucumber slices sound good.
Better yet, maybe salted cucumber slices in a sour cream sauce? Easy enough and a bright flavor alongside ham, cheese, bread, ale, and something salty.

Hm. Do hobbits have peanuts? I know they have potatoes, but potato chips are a good side with a meal - like sandwiches - not a nibble. Peanuts are a great snack food.
 
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I bet Hobbits would like these Oatmeal bacon scones
img_2582.jpg
[Thumbnail for img_2582.jpg]
 
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Great the read since I basically have to eat like a hobbit to keep my glucose stable. I always wonder how the hobbies have time to prep all that food and grow it too.
 
Carla Burke
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Mercy Pergande wrote:I bet Hobbits would like these Oatmeal bacon scones



John and I concur, and offer that a bit of fried potatoes and onions would set them off quite nicely.
 
Clay Bunch
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Bethany Brown wrote: I always wonder how the hobbies have time to prep all that food and grow it too.



I believe that question is the sum of permies.

I'm assuming that living in community in homes made of earth and natural materials allows them the luxury of division of labor and an abundance of resources.

Imagine if the top 500 active homesteaders had no 9-5 and all lived in a massive community. Why would anyone not stop for elevensies?
 
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Cinnamon rolls. The candied nuts we affectionally call Rennie Crack, the sweet bread we call anything bread , and mini quiche, egg muffins or-bacon egg cups Oh and maybe cucumber sandwiches
Sorry, just realized this is very similar to our Sunday brunch this morning. I guess we eat like hobbits, must be because we're short.
 
Cat Knight
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Burra Maluca wrote:I consulted with my other half, who was born and spent his early childhood in the shires, and we decided that most days a garibaldi biscuit or three would probably suffice.

Special days may warrant an Eccles cake instead.

Or maybe as well...



What is a Garabaldi biscuit and an Eccles Cake? Are these Doctor references? Is this like Fish Fingers and Custard? Share please
 
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Burra Maluca wrote:

Grown ups call them garibaldis. Kids call them squashed fly biscuits.

Eccles cakes are a bit like the luxury version, ideally served with Lancashire cheese.

 



I am terribly disappointed that these items are not Doctor references and have nothing to do with the many faced alien that once liked fish fingers and custard.
 
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Clay Bunch wrote:

Imagine if the top 500 active homesteaders had no 9-5 and all lived in a massive community. Why would anyone not stop for elevensies?



That’s my dream
 
r ranson
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Cat Knight wrote:

Burra Maluca wrote:

Grown ups call them garibaldis. Kids call them squashed fly biscuits.

Eccles cakes are a bit like the luxury version, ideally served with Lancashire cheese.

 



I am terribly disappointed that these items are not Doctor references and have nothing to do with the many faced alien that once liked fish fingers and custard.



This is such a hardcore part of living in England, that I'm really surprised the Dr hasn't referenced them either.  Although Jammy Dodgers do make an appearance from time to time.  
 
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I was made aware of small beer today (in a story set around 1820); the old-fashioned kind was very low in alcohol and often quite thick, almost like a porridge.  That sounds like something the hobbits would make, and drink.  (Not sure I would -- beer smells so bad to me that I've never even tasted it.)

For a snack, I could see a bit of sliced cold meat, some mustard or horseradish, cheese, fresh homemade bread dripping with butter, an apple (or a couple of plums, or whatever fruit was in season), and maybe some of that small beer, or maybe, in haying season, something like switchel.  
 
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Sour cherries, sautéed, on beef jerky is what I had laying around calling my name
 
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Kathleen Sanderson wrote: Not sure I would -- beer smells so bad to me that I've never even tasted it.  


Kathleen, some thing's need perspective, and no sniffing. Ask anyone who's had an ice cold beer on a hot afternoon, it's heavenly.
But it's okay if you don't, someone needs to be the designated driver.
 
Cat Knight
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Kathleen Sanderson wrote:  (Not sure I would -- beer smells so bad to me that I've never even tasted it.)  



In case you were wondering, beer does not taste better than it smells.
 
Kristine Keeney
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Cat Knight wrote:

Kathleen Sanderson wrote:  (Not sure I would -- beer smells so bad to me that I've never even tasted it.)


In case you were wondering, beer does not taste better than it smells.


Different types of beer smell and taste differently. If all you're exposed to is cheap pale ale, then ... yeah.
If you have had the chance to smell and/or taste a porter, stout, or mead, you might like one of those better.

I never thought I'd like beer, but that was because all I had access to was an Indian Pale Ale - IPA - that's the least of all the different beers, in my opinion.
I love a good porter or stout. I also like some homemade recipes. You have to try something before you decide if you like it.

But, yeah, you're free to *not*. There's nothing wrong with not drinking beer or anything, really. It's part of what makes this an interesting world. Everyone likes different things and does different things.
 
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I suspect hobbits would have a half a pint.  

There is so many types of beer, and a lot of the flavour depends on how the beer was kept (we aren't counting commercial beer here because hobbits).  But it can be agreed that the best beer is at The Green Dragon

 
Clay Bunch
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"May the hair on your toes never fall out"
 
Cat Knight
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r ranson wrote:I suspect hobbits would have a half a pint.  



Only if they didn't know better...
 
Uh oh, we're definitely being carded. Here, show him this tiny ad:
FREE Perma Veggies Book! - Learn how to grow the most delicious and nutritious food with the least amount of work.
https://permies.com/t/238620/perennial-vegetables/FREE-Perma-Veggies-Book
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