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Permies Poll: Do you have rainwater catchment on your homestead?

 
master gardener
Posts: 2808
Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
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Back at it again with another Permies Poll.





Splish splash, sometimes rain might mean a bath! Do you currently make use of rain on your homestead? In what capacity? For livestock/garden/personal use? To what capacity? Do you have to deal with freezing weather and if so, how?

If you have pictures of your system, please add them.
 
Timothy Norton
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Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
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I currently do not have rainwater catchment on my property.

I plan on running a butter off the roof of my chicken coop and using it for garden irrigation needs but I'm still learning how gutter systems come together before I start buying parts and pieces.
 
gardener
Posts: 784
Location: South Carolina
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I have a couple of rain barrels to catch runoff from the roof. I use it for irrigating the garden, growing seedlings, and providing water for my daughter's outdoor mud kitchen.
 
master steward
Posts: 6440
Location: southern Illinois, USA
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I have a 26,000 gal cistern that is fed off my roof.  I also have a large pond.
 
Posts: 68
Location: Central AZ
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Our current system is low-tech, gutters on the corral feed an IBC tote on each slope of the roof. One is inconveniently far from gardens, whoops. The other we use to irrigate trees and a garden bed. The system (by which I mean me) could be a lot smarter.
We plan to gutter the house roof, too, but that is a bigger project.

I admire the 26k gal cistern, John! Is it metal, concrete, or what? I have installed a number of poly tanks over the years, but a lime-plastered concrete tank has always seemed more desirable (and a lot more work! Isn't that the way of it, though).
 
John F Dean
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Location: southern Illinois, USA
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Hi Mark,

It was in place when I bought the property. I suspect the 26k represents its volume if filled to the top…which never happens. There is an overflow pipe that runs to the pond.

The cistern appears to be poured concrete.  
 
Posts: 34
Location: Coastal NorCal
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No. It's dry here other than in the winter, but there's a year round creek on the property and several springs if we need them. The rainwater catchment is technically lots of aquifers in the mountains here.
 
Posts: 2
Location: Alaska
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I have an annoying but workable system off the house gutters - 600 (+/-) gallons in second-hand poly tanks direct-filled and plumbed together, and another 550ish on an elevated platform up the hill. Currently sump-pumping water from the house-tanks to hill-tanks (when there's enough) to get better head-pressure for the garden (and double the storage). Current use is limited to garden/yard and animals, but I'm hoping to set up a filter and plumb it into the house system at some point. The utility of that project makes it a back-burner - we're in interior Alaska, so rainwater only works from late April through late September.
 
pollinator
Posts: 5162
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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My signature has a link to a topic of rainfall collection and my experience with it for many years on many jobs.
Huge tanks are the best way to go.
Poly tanks are very good.
Concrete tanks generally are harder to seal if built to a budget.
Steel tanks will deteriorate after 25 years or so, but can be built in sections with a plastic liner.

All systems need first flush systems and high water off take floating pipes.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 903
Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
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Define catchment?  I have a reservoir that about 1/4 of the total surface area of the property drains into and I am working on a second small one combined with a hugel to handle another 1/4.  But if you mean a tank catching roof then the answer is no.  And I am not likely to invest in such a thing because I live in on of the driest places on earth with normal average precip being 4 to 6 inches per year.  Go east or west from me a couple of miles  or a bit over and it goes up but is still never big.  We had an amazing year last year with roughly 15 inches but that is a once or twice in a lifetime year here.  Without the irrigation from the mountain snow packs agriculture would be nearly impossible.  For the first 30 years of my live we hauled every drop of household water from town and the rest came out of canals for irrigation.
 
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Yes, I use rainwater catchment for all of my water needs.
 
software bot
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Last vote in apple poll was on May 2, 2024
 
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