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favourite fragrant flowers?  RSS feed

 
Leila Rich
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Many of the flowers in my garden are part of a cycle, and their main purpose is to turn into my dinner!
As a bonus, some vegetable plants have very fragrant flowers .
I grow some flowers just because I think they're beautiful, but beauty must be combined with fragrance for me.

My alltime favourite is bearded iris. I have a bit of a 'thing' for them, and they like my dry, sandy soil.
The flowers look delicate, but they handle my spring gales.
They're one of those plants that are especially easy to pass from gardener to gardener, and I like that

Short-growing, intensely fragrant purple irisfrom my mum, who got it from her uncle Jack, who got it from...

An Orris variety-the root's traditionally used in perfumery. Doesn't look like much, but it smells amazing

the most fragrant of all is the white iris 'florentina'; a cultivar from around the 1500s


What's your favourite fragrant flowers?

 
Alder Burns
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Fragrance is such a powerful, almost spiritual presence....such plants are worth having, even at considerable trouble.
My list of all time favorites: Night-bloomers first....the most romantic of all....night jessamine (Cestrum nocturnum), night-scented stock (Matthiola bicornis), night-blooming tobacco (Nicotiana alata and N. sylvestris), and moonflower (Calonictyon or Ipomoea noctiflora?) . Others...freesias, paperwhite and tazetta narcissus, lilacs, water lilies and lotus, hyacinths, witch hazel, sweet olive (Osmanthus heterophyllus).
 
Su Ba
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When I lived on the Eastcoast, my all time favorite was lilacs. A fresh picked bouquet placed in the kitchen would fill the entire house with their wonderful fragrance. My second favorite was hyacinths.

I'm now in Hawaii where my favorite is white ginger, followed closely behind by Kahili ginger. Night blooming cereus is another favorite.
 
Dale Hodgins
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I clicked in to say lilac and lotus. Both can be smelled at quite a distance. When I was 18, I picked a huge bouquet of stinky daisies for my girlfriend. Her mom put them in a bucket beside an outdoor table. She also put the tomatoes and apples that I brought on the same table, in order to not have the daisies singled out.
 
Judith Browning
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clove pink, dianthus, is at the top of the list...some years the patch I have is just solid blooms and you can smell it from across the yard. I like iris too...each color seems to have a different fragrance, and lilacs are always wonderful....and right up at the top also is my old garden rose 'charles de milles' gallica that was here at an old homestead house site and is just prolific where ever I move it to.....we dry the petals and they hold the scent as a tea and for medicinal uses.
 
John Polk
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Amongst my favorites, carnation has always been a favorite.

Then, there is the plumeria/frangipani. you cannot make a proper lei without it.

And, yes - night blooming jasmine.
I have a friend from Malaysia who used to refer to the 10 o'clock flower.
When I asked about it, he stated "It doesn't bloom until 10 pm."
Turns out to be the night blooming jasmine.

 
Leila Rich
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Alder Burns wrote:freesias
I love how the plainer and unassuming they are, the more powerful the fragrance ...
John Polk wrote:plumeria/frangipani
I still remember getting off the plane in Fiji as a kid and being bowled over by the scent.
The plant and flowers look so cool too!

buddleia (butterfly bush) is a scraggly shrub, but I love the smell.
Broad beans (fava) and chard flowers are really fragrant
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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Sweet William (really - anything of the carnation family) - love that spicy scent.

For native plants - Aloysia gratissima (verbena family) - large shrub with tiny white flowers that smell strongly of vanilla!

 
Galadriel Freden
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I also love lilac, and plumeria.

And rugosa rose (and many other roses), honeysuckle, and that strong peppery lupin scent.
 
Leila Rich
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Judith Browning wrote:clove pink, dianthus
Mine have just started flowering.
Tough plants-they even do ok in pots with my cactus and succulents!
 
Marianne Cicala
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Lavender - I can never seem to get enough of it.
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Leila Rich
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Jennifer Wadsworth wrote:native plants

Our natives don't have the flashiness of many introduced plants,
but the native broom Carmichaelia odorata has mauve flowers with what I've always thought of as a 'purple flowers' smell-
lilacs, old fashioned roses, some irises smell purple too...
Cripes. "I can smell the colours" sounds a bit synaesthetic; but I'd say it's more to do with science
Don't get me started on yellow flowers!
 
Aaron Festa
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I recently discovered Sweet Annie (Artemisia annual). I can't keep my nose out of it.
 
leila hamaya
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i am missing the pineapple sage (salvia elegans) i was growing for so long, on the coast it did great for years. when i moved i dug some up and brought it with, but it died in the extreme winter last year. and its a short day plant, so i couldnt get the seed to finish before the snow =(. think i will try to grow it again even if its just an annual here in this climate, or even sacrifice some room in the hoop house just for its awesome smell.

instead now i have a lot of clary sage (salvia sclarea) which also smells amazing.

also already mentioned lavender, jasmine, and especially rugosa roses
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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How did I miss citrus!?
I love it that different types have a hint of their fruit's particular fragrance.

Sweet peas. This one's an original variety that hasn't had the fragrance bred out of it in favour of massive, frilly flowers.
It's using an obliging boysenberry and my bean poles as climbing frames
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I made a posy for a friend today, and it made me realise I've got more flowers in my garden than I ever have before
I think I'm more interested in the way the garden looks and 'feels' these days-
I'm sure it used to be much more about growing food!
 
John Saltveit
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Winter Daphne of course. Signals the end of year with its beautiful fragrance.

Also poet's jasmine in summer.

Eleagnus ebbingei x Silverberry: It's a hybrid, but it produces wonderfully fragrant flowers in October, November and December, then berries in April!

I agree with most citrus-my owari satsuma mandarin orange is beautiful, but bitter orange-flying dragon, produces no fragrance.

Also many herbs produce a beautiful fragrance even when they're not flowering, like Rosemary and Oregano.
John S
PDX OR
 
Jason Learned
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I really like tuber roses but my all time favorite is naked lady flowers an amaryllis that dies back in the spring and shoots up a great smelling stem of blooms in summer with no leaves.
 
gina kansas
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Baronia. hands. down. difficult (for me, zone 8b) not showy in any season, short life and not edible but I will never be without a plant outside my bedroom window. Before I woke up and realized how important permaculture is for the land, wildlife and my family's health, I saturated my property with plants that have amazing scent. Can anyone deny how amazing a spring breeze through a cottonwood smells? Well most of the pretty smellies have been replaced with edibles for myself and the critters but I will never give up a certain three square foot space with prime southern exposure because I truly believe I cannot live happily without a cool baronia breeze wafting through my house. And I simply cannot afford the oil until I win the lottery!
 
gina kansas
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Marianne Cicala wrote:Lavender - I can never seem to get enough of it.
Hanging bunches with your drying linen is pure genius!! Stealing this and running fast
 
Matu Collins
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Hmmmm, tough question. I think Sweet Annie, Sweet Alyssum and Sweet Woodruff. I'm sensing a theme...
 
Lydia Pfalfav
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I always loved peonies, roses, lilacs & lavender. When I moved to the south several years back I discovered Osmanthus & I can't get enough of it!
 
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