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Psychology and Tiny Houses

 
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Location: North Central North Carolina Zone 7B
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Personal preference, what is small and crowded to one is overly spacious to another.


To paraphrase: I once complained about the size of my tiny home until I met a homeless man...

 
pollinator
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Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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Kena, I understand for a family staying all at home (in quarantine) you don't think of a tiny house. But for a single person it might be the opposite.
Someone who likes being alone, who can work from home / at home, who doesn't need a lot of stuff or large things ... and if there's a garden around the tiny house to grow the needed food ... then being in quarantine in a tiny house can be an ideal situation.
 
pollinator
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Location: Boston, Massachusetts
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As a partner of someone whose work shifted to work-from-home and Zoom meetings, I'll say that discrete space for WFH is going to become more important. Her desk got hurriedly setup in our living room, which is adjacent to kitchen, and the hallway to bath and bedrooms. During calls/classes/meetings use of kitchen was not possible save for quiet tasks, and transit to bath or bedrooms was in view of camera, and therefore off limits.
Our house has openings between kitchen, dining, living rooms, but by no means "open-plan". Luckily we have a second bath in finished basement, so it's not a total disaster. If my job was possible from home, we could operate on separate levels and do fine. My coworker's spouse is WFH and their condo IS open-plan, so she either has to retreat to bedroom or go outside while he is on calls.
Thankfully we have plenty of outside space as well, and plenty to be done in it!!  
 
gardener
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i was wondering the same thing. I suppose the good thing about tiny houses is that they generally have some sort of access to the outdoors, and are probably way less limiting than a small apartment with no balcony, for example.
My house is quite small (about 500 square feet), and we are pretty careful about clutter and organization, but for me it has always been 100% worth it to have my own work space that is separate from where I sleep and relax. I am seeing colleagues have a real hard time working from their bedroom or sofa or kitchen table and I`m glad that I insisted on having separate office space (if tiny-- 2.5x just under 3m- same size as my bathroom) from the beginning. This in a tiny house could probably just as easily be something involving a folding screen or something, but I know for me I want my work life separate from everything else.
Our outdoor covered porch is getting a workout, as it always does, as a work/garden/animal/brewing/pantry/etc space.
 
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Location: Zone 9a, Florida
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This is a very interesting topic. My husband and I started living in a 30' travel trailer in September of 2021. It has a single slide, which makes it feel much larger, but all in all is less than 200sqft of walkable living space. Before moving in to this setup, we rented a 1500sqft 3/2 in a large city. We spent about a month getting rid of most of the stuff we own and all we kept is important documents, childhood memory stuff, and my art studio.

Overall, we love it. The close proximity has only been a problem a few times, but we live on 10 acres so if we get tired of one another and need some introvert time, we can go out into the woods and do some axe throwing, work in our garden, or visit any of the animals we have on the property (I'm partial to the bunnies myself).

What I think is the saving grace of our living situation is my 10x16 shed that I've converted into my studio, so most of my day is spent in the shed and my husband works in the trailer.

A vast majority of people have told us they could not do what we do, which I completely understand. We just personally enjoy closer proximity to nature and feeling less attached to personal belongings. Additionally, when we think back to our time in a normal sized house, we spent most of our time together in our office which was a 10x12 room, and my studio was a 12x14 room, so not much has changed other than not having closets full to the brim with random junk.

The only thing I miss is having a decently sized bathroom/shower.


 
pollinator
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Location: Western MA, zone 6b
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Well,  the pandemic personally didn't change my life/lifestyle very much at all.   I'm single with grown children, and live alone with 2 big dogs and an indoor cat.  So there really wasn't suddenly extra people all at home at the same time.  I'm self employed and my work time didn't really change either.  

My current single-family home is 675sqft.   I don't use the second bedroom,not even for storage, I just don't have enough stuff to "need" it.   So that takes me down to about 550 sqft that I live in,  and includes kitchen, bath, laundry areas.    No basement or attic.   It never feels crowded or tight in that space,  I'm fairly minimal with how much "stuff" I own and keep.  My furniture is scaled to fit.  Plenty of open and walk through space.  
Psychologically I NEED open space, uncluttered surfaces, and not to feel boxed in.   That's been easy to achieve in 550.   I often speculate how much more of that 550  could I shave off and not miss it one bit?  I still have unused closet and cabinet space.   Pretty sure I could go down to 400,  or 350 without feeling much sacrifice.    Less than that?  Probably not while still having the indoor animals that I live/share space with.  But maybe.   While I spend a LOT of time outdoors,  I'm pretty heat/cold sensitive (RA, Fibromyalgia) so I need to consider indoor space during the hottest/coldest times.  But then moving to a more hospitable climate could solve some of that.  

Now I'm not sure what I'd do without my garden/tool shed;  that outdoor storage is essential for yard/ garden/ vehicle tools and maintenance, and outdoor animal supplies, etc.   That floorspace is another 200sqft. of storage.
 
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We love our school bus turned tiny home! As 50 something empty nesters, we dreamed, planned and built our Skoolie together almost 5 years ago. We are in our 4th year of full timing, staying stationary except for a location change up every year or two. With jobs and family nearby, and young grandchildren, we are saving travel for later. Our bus is an older model International- ‘93, and minus all the technical garb of modern vehicles, its easy to work on and parts aren’t too hard to find. We love our little home and have everything we need, and not a thing that we don’t. Some days I miss my art studio space but that’s a goal for the near future and I make due with smaller projects and different interests for now. We are in SE PA and have made a garden and flower beds wherever we land, also taking our flock of chickens with us (yes they have a separate coop)
Tiny Homesteading is pretty sweet and we look forward to our own little piece of land someday so we can stay and put down roots and call it all our own.
We are always on the lookout for similar minded friends to share with, (we alsodo work-shares in exchange for parking, or just pay rent) If you’re near us (Lancaster/Berks county PA and want to chat, please get in touch!
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