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What do you wish your home had, and what do you love in your home?

 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: Australia, Canberra
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I would have loved to have an attached green house where I can pump the warm and moist air into the house during winter as well as growing vegetables.
 
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Travis Johnson wrote:

J Anders wrote:I wish people weren't so secretive about their income but they'll gladly hang their expenses out to dry. It just makes it hard for younger people to understand what's possible out there.



There is some truth to this for sure, but equally I wish people would understand that having large acreage does not automatically equate to large amounts of income. It take money to convert crops to cash. Just because someone might have 400 acres of hay, and hay is worth $40 a bale, UNTIL that hay ground is mown, teddied, raked and baled with fuel, time and equipment, that conversion from grass to valued product does not happen. And getting that grass to be of such quality that it has value at $40 a bale takes expense too. Buying manure or even moving my own sheep manure costs money, not to mention adding lime to get the PH right. A few acres? That is not so bad...now scale it up to a few hundred acres and its almost impossible to stay on top of.

For me, 3/4 of my land base is tied up in forestry, but yet that forest land only nets me $70 per acre per year sustainably. (Growth of 1 cord, per acre, per year). Property taxes chew into that profit per acre per year pretty deeply! That is just its value, actually harvesting the wood costs money that eats into the profit even more. Sure I can log off 70 acres and cash my check for $150,000, but a person must realize it took 35 years for those trees to grow. 35 years of taxes. 35 years of careful forest management. And it costs money to buy farm in the first place.

I can get more than $250 an acre of course raising sheep on the farmland, but to convert forest into farmland is a very laborious and costly endeavor. It can be done, and I do my share of it, but it is not easy to do. Equally, raising sheep takes work every day, barns, and end investment in livestock. Trees just grow, but the pay per acre is so much less. That is the trade off.

Why do farmers talk a lot about expenses? Because production costs, property taxes, paying the farm mortgage, and raising a family exceeds what the farm makes for income. That is why on average, new farms last three years.



Thank you..... good to see perspective from the other side of the equation. It's a real pain in the posterior to be a farmer certainly. I lost a chance at inheriting 80 acres of rich Iowa farm dirt awhile back. Farmer stole it from under me writing a contract with my grandma for 1k an acre. Told me she never wanted me to become a farmer. At the time it was worth 2k-3k an acre, recently it has been as high as 12k an acre... now falling to the 5k-7k range generally some places still sky high. Would have been nice to have had the chance to start on it but can't cry over spilt milk... 50k is what I get later this year and I'll have to invest it wisely. Probably in tools for a metal working shop and start building hard to find stuff.
 
Posts: 24
Location: Southern Alberta
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Love these discussions with people chiming in with their different viewpoints; its the best of diversity.

Were I'm at in the great white north (+90F summer/-30F winter) I'm thinking of a retreatable design.  A core that will be kept at room temperature and a west end large breezeway/entrance room that will kept above freezing that will contain things like laundry, storage, utilities.  A deck/patio wrapping around the east end so I can seek out/hide from the sun as appropriate.
 
Posts: 126
Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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We're getting closer to figuring out our site plan. Here's the latest version  - sorry about all the overwriting on it. It's definitely a work in progress.  There is nothing at all at the site now. Well, actually there is a lot, but it's primarily trees.  (edited to update to most current working site plan)

 
gardener
Posts: 466
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I just want a space big enough that I don't trip over my two hoxers while I'm moving around to cook. On the plus side of living in tents and tiny caravans for 5 blxxxy years is we know exactly how to organise the house we are renovating to eliminate all the problems we are having now. Also a larger space will relieve some of the minor bickering that is the result if being so close to each other now we are both retired. I remember us kids clubbing together to buy my Dad a greenhouse for his retirement. Really it was for my Mum. She was going insane having Dad home all the time.
 
pollinator
Posts: 420
Location: Derbyshire, UK
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Better air quality! We spent ages insulating the house and sealing all the gaps up but now the air quality suffers (though purposeful ventilation to sort out the air quality is better than the random drafts we had before!).
 
Posts: 283
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
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Build a real storm shelter.  I live in North Alabama and every spring and fall there are times you will be glad it is there.  Built it inside the house and it does not need to be big.  Just large enough and close enough so everyone can scramble inside.
 
Posts: 115
Location: East tn
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Erica Colmenares wrote:

Jess Dee wrote:


I completely agree with you about bedrooms not needing to be big. Many stock house plans waste (in my opinion) so much space on bedrooms. Thanks for pointing out the stora


Good point! Our whole property is sloped, with a long lane down the middle (sloped to the east and west, away from the N/NW lane). The area we're thinking of building, near the old tobacco field, would allow for a south-facing long side of the house. If the plan is right.  



A root cellar, walk out basement where you take advantage of ground temperature without risking moisture would be amazing. I would make the walk out door of thick glass for soundproofong.

I moved to the woods for nature sounds but the sound of,jet planes showed up around 3 years ago and it would be great to have a quiet room. Also during real cold weather and power outage you could sleep in basement with just a little wood stove for heat.

 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Posts: 466
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I actualally like a big bedroom where I can escape and have a big comfy chair in peace and quiet and knit or practice the keyboard without disturbing anyone. The other rooms can be minimum - bed and side tables for guests.
I would kill for a basement though.
 
pollinator
Posts: 320
Location: Poland, zone 6, CfB
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A passive solar thermal battery under the house, along with conservatory attached to the south side of the house is my biggest wish.

As pure fantasy, I would love to have a house by the lake, with fishing boat parked in the garrage that is a part of the house :D
 
Erica Colmenares
Posts: 126
Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:Really it was for my Mum. She was going insane having Dad home all the time.


Fabulous. What a great story, and solution!

Off topic, but interested that you're in Galicia. We lived in Vigo when I was a kid. Such a beautiful part of the world!!
 
Posts: 122
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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My house is not my dream house. My dream house would be a dome home. But it is what is a single wide mobile home. I bought it used for $22K from some neighbors who lived in it while they built their dream solar home. I then moved it my property just around the corner. The thing is I'm right over a giant aquifer, so my water table is very high. That means installing a raised septic system. The first guy said it was all done and inspected and that I would get my approval in the mail, but he needed the final payment to pay for all the tanks, pump etc. He didn't even install a tank or pump, no pipes in the raised mound nothing. So I had to hire another guy to finish the job. All I can say is that it has been nothing but trouble since it was built and installed. I wish I had heard about the less expensive compost toilets that they have out now, and I never would have made one, just a grey water system.  My husband who is now disabled and on oxygen 24/7 started to put a new roof on in the fall of 2017. After having his oxygen tank roll off the roof several times, he finally fell of the ladder and hurt his ribs. This is now February of 2019 and nothing more has been done to the roof. We now have leaks. All the floors need replacing etc. And at the moment the water pipes are frozen again! I hate this house, but it is all I have so I am slowly trying to fix it up. I would like at least one more room. If I had a real dining room and a real walk-in pantry, this house would be doable. So I bought a shed from a closed garden center just down the road. it'.s 14' x 32' on a mobile home trailer. I have to sell all the garden stock she had in it but that should pay for the building.Some really beautiful cast iron planters, etc. Some what the heck was she thinking stuff as well. Anyone need cases of little kid hand garden tools? seed sprouters (bean sprouts etc.)  Anyway, y thought in buying the building was that we could attach it to our mobile home where we had one of our large windows, making that into a door way. Windows like doorways have stronger headers. There is also a set of barn doors that I think should be made into glass doors since they would face south. That amount of space would make either a dining room or a living room, possibly both, with some room to spare for a pantry. As gardeners and homesteaders, we all know what it's like storing all the food you've grown and preserved, put a freezer to meat that you've raised or when on a good sale. Plus let's face it where do you store all the canning pots, and empty jars?

So that's my idea. Of course, my husband and his stepfather, are all saying that's too complicated, just lower the shed to the grown and then you can use the barn doors to drive in and park the lawn mower, bla bla bla. It is already wire with electric all you have to do is plug in an extension cord to the male plug on one end. So there are over head lights, a vent fan, and outlets. The Garden lady's husband is an electrician. So once again, my idea that would solve Sooooo many problems is shot down. I am deeply depressed again.
 
Josephine Howland
Posts: 122
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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Oh and for people who need some shade on their south side. Plant Tamarack (American Larch) trees. They look like evergreens in the summer to give you shade, but they drop their needles in the winter to let the sun warm your house. We have them and they work great.
 
Erica Colmenares
Posts: 126
Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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Josephine, I love your idea for using the shed. Of course it's harder than just plunking it on the ground, but sounds like it'd be worth it. I'm sorry that you can't get your husband on board. You have a lot on your plate. Good luck with selling the garden stock. Maybe someone will scoop it all up!
 
gardener
Posts: 712
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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I know one goal in permaculture is to eat what is in season, but that's not always easy to do, so the one thing I would really like is a decent 2 room root cellar (so that things that don't play nice together can be separated) and a cool dry area for home canned goods. I've got boxes of canning jars in my front hall, others in the laundry room, and tucked into various corners of the "pantry". I agree with all the comments made about such things - air flow, temperature management, ease of access both for filling and emptying.

Being in a colder climate and being familiar with some much colder places, I totally agree with not only keeping water pipes close together, but also trying to keep them on *interior* walls! Intelligently run hot water pipes can save a lot of energy. A friend's kitchen sink is so far from the hot water tank that it's noticeable how much water is wasted waiting for the hot to come. I can understand why it's traditional to put the kitchen sink beneath a window, and if there's actually a view, that would be pleasant, but my former home and my sister's home have wonderful views of a neighbor's brick wall! Warmer pipes would have made more sense. We also need to get over the modern idea that houses need 3 or 5 or more full bathrooms.  To me that's a huge waste of space and resources. I can see having a toilet stall as part of a mud room, and I've seen designs where there were pocket doors dividing a larger bathroom into toilet, bath/shower area and main sink area. This seems an intelligent way to be able to have multiple people use the facilities without building duplicates.

I know that many people love open concept, cathedral ceiling homes, but my friend that had one, sold it, as she was tired of the kitchen noise impacting on other activities, including sleeping, as the high ceiling impacted the noise level in one of the bedrooms. There are a few climates where they are an asset, but in my friend's case they were constantly using a ceiling fan to move the air to where they wanted it. Pocket doors, French doors, and movable room dividers are good things to plan for so that kitchen areas can be isolated when needed, but open when appropriate.

I'd also like to vote for smaller houses, but bigger workshops and a greenhouse (attached is fine) for anyone planning on being independent on an acreage. I'm tired of using my kitchen table as a potting bench!

 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I know what you mean about kitchen noises - we have a separate room(the bodega) being converted to a canning room where I will also put the washing machine and dishwasher (I DON'T CARE HOW MUCH WATER IT USES - I HATE WASHING UP - BITE ME)  so I dont have to listen to them in the kitchen/living room..  i just hate that sound. Reminds me of being bored as a child waiting for my mum to finish her chores.
 
Charli Wilson
pollinator
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Location: Derbyshire, UK
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If we're going for absolute dreams.. then I'll take an outside insulated workshop please (easier to leave the dust and mess in a workshop, in the house I feel compelled to clean it up!). And a natural swimming pool. And an attached greenhouse (heck, I'd like an attached garden too! I can't see my garden from my house as the two aren't actually next to each other).

More realistically I'd love a mudroom/porch. Our door goes straight into the kitchen and everyone treks mud in.
 
Erica Colmenares
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Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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Charli Wilson wrote:If we're going for absolute dreams.. then I'll take an outside insulated workshop please (easier to leave the dust and mess in a workshop, in the house I feel compelled to clean it up!). And a natural swimming pool. And an attached greenhouse (heck, I'd like an attached garden too! I can't see my garden from my house as the two aren't actually next to each other).


I like the way you dream!

More realistically I'd love a mudroom/porch. Our door goes straight into the kitchen and everyone treks mud in.


The mudroom/porch does seem very helpful. We've had both setups in homes, an old Victorian with a huge foyer (which bugged me then because it used up so much space, though now I'd love it) and a front door that dumped everyone right into the living room.
 
Josephine Howland
Posts: 122
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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Erica Colmenares wrote:We're getting closer to figuring out our site plan. Here's the latest version  - sorry about all the overwriting on it. It's definitely a work in progress.  There is nothing at all at the site now. Well, actually there is a lot, but it's primarily trees.  (edited to update to most current working site plan)




Erica, a word of advice, very expensive experience: Don't have your driveway drive over your septic field. If you get frozen ground that is. When you drive over any of your septic lines, you drive the frost lower than normal. Your septic lines will then freeze, and possible break. Been there, done that. Just a caution. Truthfully with the lower cost compostable toilets out there, I would never use a septic again.
 
Posts: 13
Location: Finland
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This is probably late for the OP to make much use of, and maybe the climate is too different as well for much of it, but maybe it can still be of some use even if to someone else.

I haven't lived here long enough to really see how well different aspects work long term, but I'm more than satisfied with our home.  The previous owners built our house while they had been running a small dairy for years.  The layout is great.  All the bedrooms are on the north side of the house, cooler and darker for better sleeping.  The entrances on the main floor lead almost immediately to a wet room where someone could get hosed down.  The main entrance has an enclosed unheated veranda surrounded by windows that can be used like a greenhouse in the summer.  Then before entering the house, there's an airlock with the aforementioned wet rooms, as a buffer against winter cold.  Whoever engineered the overhang length was spot on with little sun in the summer, but what little sun the winter has to offer lights up the whole of the south facing living areas.  The plumbing could be better clustered, even allowing for the wet rooms in a different area of the house, but the hot water supply also heats for us, and all the non-radiator related plumbing is at least located on interior walls.  Radiant heat is so much better for my health, not just more energy and cost efficient.  The electrical panel is at the entrance, much easier to access than some dark corner of the basement.  The basement includes a root cellar located next to the stairs with a vegetable drop hatch accessible from outside (I've seen similar setups for firewood).  The stairwell is open to the main floor, which helps control moisture and direct heat up from the masonry oven.  The basement walks out, but not such that it has full windows. There's another unheated room as a buffer there which is used as firewood storage.  That room is enclosed with firedoors.  The furnace room is also built to contain a fire.  The same chimney is used for a masonry bread oven, a wood stove, and the furnace.  The sauna has direct access to the back exit for a cool break on the porch or roll in the snow.  The roof is metal with a permanent ladder and catwalk for chimney sweeping or shoveling if the snow load gets dangerous some winter.  That was also really useful last summer when we had to put wire netting over the exhausts to keep the mosquitoes out.  I like that the toilets are in rooms without a bathing option and the places where one could hose off, shower, or sauna do not include toilets.  Growing up, I didn't like having to let family members in to use the toilet while I was bathing.

That all said, there are certainly things I would have done differently.  I think radiant floor heating would be preferable to the radiators under the windows.  We make use of rugs, slippers, and wool socks, but I wish I could have the say in getting rugs out of the kitchen space and radiant floor heating in the kitchen might help with that.  The kitchen also has wood floors and wood does not wear well in such a utilized room.  Our laundry and toilet rooms don't have floor drains like some places I've lived in the past, which would be peace of mind for potential leaks, though they get smelly if water circulates through them so infrequently that the dry up.  I would get rid of some plumbing I find unnecessary, including water toilets.  Someday, we hope to replace our hookups to city water back to our better tasting well and have a passive grey water system instead of lugging buckets and losing plenty of valuable resource to sewage.  There are built in cupboard style closets in the bedrooms and in a couple of the rooms that makes access around the beds frustrating.  I would have been happier with no closets/cupboards in the bedrooms and instead using a standalone movable wardrobe and dresser.  At least that's easy to change once we get to it and those cupboards can be reused in the shop.  Some of the overhead lighting is wired in a way that's nonsensical to me and not trivial to change.  Pay attention to which way you want doors to swing because one door in the house swings the wrong way to me and blocks another doorway when open.

This last part is concern passed down to me from my mother who was always notifying city officials of sidewalks that weren't wheelchair accessible and handicap parking spaces that didn't meet code.  Through her work met with people on a daily basis who could no longer live in the bulk of their home.  While the necessary parts of the house are reasonably accessible (at least one bedroom on the same level as a kitchen and living space) and the shower is a wet room instead of a raised basin stall, it would be nice to include some more universal design elements, like outlets not so close to the floor, wider clearance in some of the doorways.  Towel racks in bathrooms could discretely be assisted handrails/grab bars, though the wall construction has to support the weight.  Consider pocket doors, which automatically give more clearance because the door isn't taking up space.  The down side is that limits where wiring can be.  Space under counters or sinks for wheel chair access could be retrofitted without too much difficulty in many cases, but not side to side clearance in bathrooms and hallways, a walker being able to sidestep is bare minimum.  Universal design is worth looking into and ties in well with permaculture.
 
Erica Colmenares
Posts: 126
Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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M. Crex wrote:The basement includes a root cellar located next to the stairs with a vegetable drop hatch accessible from outside (I've seen similar setups for firewood).



This sounds like an awesome set-up. This, and so many other elements you described. I'm the OP, and no, it's not too late. :-)



Universal design is worth looking into and ties in well with permaculture.


I completely agree. We're in our mid-50s, and plan to age in place, so we're trying to think ahead. If we get the contractor we'd like, he's of like mind. An earlier poster, James Freyr, mentioned planning for aging as well, and included some interesting ideas, like deeper stair treads to the basement, in his post. (His house build is documented here).
 
Erica Colmenares
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Josephine Howland wrote:

Erica, a word of advice, very expensive experience: Don't have your driveway drive over your septic field. If you get frozen ground that is. When you drive over any of your septic lines, you drive the frost lower than normal. Your septic lines will then freeze, and possible break. Been there, done that. Just a caution. Truthfully with the lower cost compostable toilets out there, I would never use a septic again.



Thanks, Josephine. That sounds like a nightmare. So, for our design, are you talking about the perimeter path? There is one part of that that could potentially see a truck cross, between the garden and the house.
 
Josephine Howland
Posts: 122
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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Erica Colmenares wrote:

Josephine Howland wrote:

Erica, a word of advice, very expensive experience: Don't have your driveway drive over your septic field. If you get frozen ground that is. When you drive over any of your septic lines, you drive the frost lower than normal. Your septic lines will then freeze, and possible break. Been there, done that. Just a caution. Truthfully with the lower cost compostable toilets out there, I would never use a septic again.



Thanks, Josephine. That sounds like a nightmare. So, for our design, are you talking about the perimeter path? There is one part of that that could potentially see a truck cross, between the garden and the house.




Yes, the bath, trucks driving over you septic lines or field could potentially crush your system. I would advise you to not put your septic in an area where there is a potential  for vehicle traffic. Why ask for trouble, if you're able to redraw the plans beforehand.
 
Jay Angler
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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@Erica Colmenares - this is slightly tangential, but it was commented earlier about the issues of off-gassing of various new building materials. If it's possible, it would be good to stock up on plants that are known to help clear toxins from the air. This article quotes a NASA study:  https://www.bhg.com.au/best-air-cleaning-plants   There's lots of overlap between the toxins that they absorb, so you don't have to have all the species mentioned - just a selection that covers the chemicals most likely to be off-gassing. I've got some spider plants, and when I painted the boys rooms, I made sure the spiders moved in for several months. I know I'm particularly sensitive to formaldehyde, and spider plants absorb it.
 
Erica Colmenares
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This is perhaps tangential, but if you were building from scratch on wooded land, and wanted passive solar, would you leave trees immediately east or west of the house? We are marking trees this week to save or keep.
 
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This is the easiest question for me to answer ever: I wish I had a second toilet for my husband!

I love my south facing backyard, with a view of the giant trees behind us in the regional park, and the regular shows the clouds put on we can watch from our back patio.
 
Jay Angler
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My experience with West sun, is that it overheats the house even if you've kept it cool the rest of the day. Depending on your weather patterns, west sun in the evening can be good for pleasant lighting in the winter, in which case, I'd keep deciduous trees to the west/south-west based on the track of the sun in the winter.

In hot climates, many people want shelter from the morning sun also. For me a little morning sun helps me get going, but then for the last 20 years, a *little* is all I've gotten as we've got a 150 foot cedar/fir forest with deciduous trees at the edge starting 10 feet east of the house. In our very moderate coastal climate, over-heating isn't a concern.

One solution for balancing summer/winter needs, is to have a fast growing, heat loving plant like runner beans trellised 6 ft or so out from the side of the house. I used that technique myself when living in Ont. where summers are much hotter than here on the coast.
 
pollinator
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I will soon be building in a climate where there will be no heating or cooling of the house. But I will take Heating and Cooling into consideration.

Large overhangs are a must both the control sun and keep rainwater at a safe distance. But rainwater is mostly a problem just because of the puddles. Wood will only be used for the roof and the window and door frames. Slab on grade with hollow block walls.

I want to build tightly to the east face of a slope, so that most sun is received in the morning. The hillside and trees will block the Western Sun.

The house must function well with just two people in it, but then it needs to be able to expand the sleeping space for up to 10. This will be accomplished by having extra foam mattresses and by having a couple sets of bunk beds that are used for storage and drying racks most of the time. The mattresses will be stored against the wall, so that the beds are basically big wooden tables with many hooks that will be used either for hanging clothing or herbs and spices to be dried.

I only like wet bathrooms. This is the type of bathroom that has tile or some other waterproof material on all surfaces, so that when things need to be cleaned, you use a hose to wash the sinks and toilets and every other surface. Anything that isn't to get wet, goes inside cupboards that have flashings which allow the water to run off. The floor is sloped and all water runs through a pipe that leads to the garden. The screen on the end prevents snakes and rodents from entering.

There must be a swimming area.

There are a few other things on the wish list, but they probably won't be built. I'd like a teleportation chamber, a dungeon, an anti gravity room, and several machine gun turrets :-)
 
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Erica Colmenares wrote:This is perhaps tangential, but if you were building from scratch on wooded land, and wanted passive solar, would you leave trees immediately east or west of the house? We are marking trees this week to save or keep.



Maybe too late, but I think having trees to the west is good as it keeps from overheating in the summer, and no winter passive gain is ever gotten from there.  I wish I had less tall trees on the east, then I would get more morning sun and heat, which I like

Also, earlier you talked alot about keeping plumbing in one area, but then the washing amchine was on the other side of the house and where is the water heater ? If the water heater is far away from the kitchen and bathrooms you will have long pipe runs which means an energy loss of hot water heat and a longer wait and colder water at the taps  


If you agree with the other responders idea to not have septic field under the garden path, you could move that leach field to the area west of the house between the house and the driveway, unless that area is already wooded.  There is a type of leach field that is made to be under trees that you can do, so then you can plant trees there after the leach field is installed.
 
pollinator
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Hi Erica, I'll reply with one caveat, (I haven't read all 3 pages of posts, lol) so if this has been covered, I apologize. If this is meant to be your forever house, than you might want to consider adding things in that would help with any future limited mobility issues. For example, if you are going with a 2-story, a handicap-accessible master on the first floor (can double as an in law suite for now/and with a handicap accessible bathroom). Wider hallways/doorways, ect. they add a small bit to a budget, but in a retrofit can add to substantial costs and limit space available. For a 1-story, I would still advocate for larger hallways/doorways, because you just don't know what life will bring you. Wider halls and doors allow for easier furniture delivery and give you options down the road, if needed.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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I wish my house hax a new hip. oh wait - that's me! Mind you, my body is a temple....

 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Seriously though,  I agree with aprevious posts. We are making downstairs wheelchair friendly. Even if it is just in case one of us breaks a leg. Now ask me how I know that. The other thing is a fully functioning canning/food prepping area in the bodega. I know it is the fashion to prep for disasters and civil unrest, but we are thinking more of long periods of incapacity, hence the wheelchair access, when popping to the store is not an option.
 
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The wood carvings, they all hold a lot of memories.
 
Erica Colmenares
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I appreciate the reminders about making sure to plan for the future. I have two (or more) plans about that. The first floor of the house is definitely going to be accessible. And we're planning for a future apartment beside the garage that is also accessible - I could see a time where I live there and the main house has a family in it (PEP certified, of course!).

We're further along now, although we haven't built thing one. The main news is that we now have an actual real life address!! That is unreasonably exciting.

While this thread isn't just about our project, I'll share our almost-final plans: the site, the first floor and the second floor. There will be an unfinished basement under 2/3rds of the house, and some kind of barn or storage under the screen porch. The house is bigger than I anticipated, around 1800 sf. That is due in part to me liking being married to my current husband. :-)

The screened porch, shown here to the south, is now along the eastern edge of the house.


This is mostly done, except the kitchen island will all be at one level, the dining and living areas are flip-flopped (use-wise) and the wood stove will be inside! The architect is trying to meet Passive House standards, and is hoping we'll reconsider that. We're holding firm.


I think the only change to this floor is that there will be a pocket door to the "snug," so that it can be closed off when that's helpful.


 
Jay Angler
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@ Erica Colmenares - Looking at the floor plans you just posted, I would like to suggest that you put sound dampening material in the walls between the dining room and the master bedroom and in the upper floor bedroom wall that is against the "open to below. I have a friend who moved after issues with keeping "noisy areas" sound deadened from "quiet areas" were too difficult to resolve.
 
pollinator
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I wish our house had a master bedroom!

We moved into this Tiny House last fall, and the kids did not want to downsize, so we enticed them with each child having their own bedrooms. They are small, unlike their old bedrooms, but our other home was (3) big bedrooms with (4) children and (2) adults. Now we live in a four bedroom home...

But that means 4 children, and 4 bedrooms...there is none for Katie and I.

Because I sleep on the couch, and Katie sleeps on the other couch, my whole world consists of Kitchen, Living Room and Bathroom.

We get by, but I will admit it has had no so great effects on our marriage. It is not so much what a person would think it would be; amicable domestic relations, though that is not existant in this house I admit. It is not having a place to retreat for private conversations, or a place to put our stuff. It is a Tiny House, so there is no need to yell, just talking you can hear anyone talking elsewhere in the house...no matter where they are.

So a Master Bedroom would be nice!
 
Erica Colmenares
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Jay Angler wrote:put sound dampening material in the walls between the dining room and the master bedroom and in the upper floor bedroom wall that is against the "open to below.



This is a helpful idea that I would not have thought of - thanks!
 
Erica Colmenares
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Travis Johnson wrote:I wish our house had a master bedroom!
[snip]
Because I sleep on the couch, and Katie sleeps on the other couch, my whole world consists of Kitchen, Living Room and Bathroom.


That's a lot, Travis. I respect you meeting your kids' needs, yet wish there had been a way for yours and Katie's to be met as well. Might be time for a family meeting?
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Travis Johnson wrote:I wish our house had a master bedroom!



Would a small motorhome be possible that you could retire to at night? Or a wee log cabin built on the side?
 
Tell me how it all turns out. Here is a tiny ad:
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