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! Harvesting seeds from your groceries  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 2156
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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My sweet potatoes weren't much to brag about last year so I bought a locally grown organic sweet potato from the store last month.  Buried it 75% in potting soil in a salad green container (actually two containers, upper one with drainage holes, lower one without).  I "planted" it 3/20, the first sprouts appeared 3/31 and this is what it looks like today.  When they get a bit taller I'll break them off and pot them individually in 2.5" pots until it's time to move them outside.

I did also try one of my best looking crappy potatoes from last year and you can see it molding away in the left corner of the container.
my-sweet-potatoes.jpg
[Thumbnail for my-sweet-potatoes.jpg]
 
Posts: 92
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Love this topic and have been doing it for years.

* A bag of raw unshelled peanuts. Only plant the whole ones, can fill a plot for just a couple of dollars.
* Practically any of the dried bean varieties are able to grow.
* Coriander, celery seed, etc from the spice aisle will also grow so long as they are whole seed.
* Mango, apple, peach, any of the stone fruits will spout as well if you provide the dormancy conditions.

The other great benefit is those you don't plant you can cook up and eat in some form or fashion!

This is an old article but it deserves a place of honor in the forums.
 
pollinator
Posts: 10117
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I just bought some dried White Mulberries.  Do you think they might grow if planted?

https://www.heb.com/product-detail/navitas-naturals-organic-mulberry-berries/1471540
 
john mcginnis
Posts: 92
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Tyler Ludens wrote:I just bought some dried White Mulberries.  Do you think they might grow if planted?

https://www.heb.com/product-detail/navitas-naturals-organic-mulberry-berries/1471540



80/20 chance they will not. Depends on how the packer dried them for how long at what temperature.  But what do you have to lose? Slap a couple of berries in some potting soil and see what come up! :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 436
Location: mountains of Tennessee
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Tyler. I lived latitude 30 Centex for many years. Had very good success with seeds from Mexican peppers & Mexican squash from HEB.

Send me some enchiladas & we'll call it even:)
 
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A tomato plant that grew from a supermarket seed in compost has survived my entire Adelaide winter despite nights dropping to 3 degrees C/ 37 F. Whilst other people are germinating seeds right now I have a very tough plant 1' tall that'll produce tomatoes possibly in Spring!

If it works well I might plant tomato plants during Autumn each year rather than Spring. We go through stress for 'economic efficiency' (plant spinach instead so that you double your crops in the same space), but less efficient methods can be much more enjoyable and easier.
 
pollinator
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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If it works well I might plant tomato plants during Autumn each year rather than Spring. We go through stress for 'economic efficiency' (plant spinach instead so that you double your crops in the same space), but less efficient methods can be much more enjoyable and easier.


The ideal is to plant your harvested tomato and pepper seeds in among the spinach or other greens so they are sheltered by cold tolerant annuals which will reach maturity and be removed about the time most people start their transplants.
One of our co-op directors had a low tunnel full of cherry tomatoes. at the end of the season she pulled the spent plants and closed it up for the winter. The soil was covered in fallen tomatoes so when she opened it to plant the next spring there was a solid carpet of little tomato plants ready to transplant. The natural way to plant the nightshade family is to let the fruit rot on the ground.

I wanted a summer ground cover to keep the ground open so I could transplant raspberries in the winter. I bought a bag of bird seed and sowed it on the bare ground, mulched it with grass clippings and watered it thoroughly. I now have ripening about ten times as much millet, sorghum, thistle and sunflower seed.
The golden flax and lentils dried out early so I only have about as much as I planted to harvest for the chickens. My old hens have become experts at recognizing seed heads and pods to thresh their food so all I have to do is through the mature plants in the tractor to feed them.  They are working their way through the dwarf apple orchard now eating the wheat that came up where they buried seed they missed. This process started when a friend plantd wheat for a cover crop but then was not able to plow it in the spring. I mowed it with my scythe and stacked it in the barn to throw them a bundle each day.

Don't work any harder than necessary. let things reproduce as they naturally do.
 
Posts: 82
Location: South of Capricorn
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Tim Kivi wrote:A tomato plant that grew from a supermarket seed in compost has survived my entire Adelaide winter despite nights dropping to 3 degrees C/ 37 F. ....

If it works well I might plant tomato plants during Autumn each year rather than Spring.


I am also southern hemisphere and have SO MUCH trouble with tomatoes (insects that drill the stems and wilt the whole plant. I've tried most everything I dare to and essentially stopped growing tomatoes). I left my garden basically untouched from early June to right about now because of some travel, and I have a few volunteer tomatoes from the compost that are full of fruit (one grape tomatoes, one "normal"). They survived 2 strong frosts at least, which appear to keep the bugs away. I would usually be starting tomatoes right now (if I dared). I'm excited!!
 
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I read through most of this thread this past week. tonight I spent 3xs as long at the grocery store as I usually do because I was checking out the seed supplies! I found whole cumin, fennel and dill seed, like an ounce each for 99 cents. I also picked up some lentils and garbanzo beans to experiment with as winter cover crops.

I looked longingly at the mixed nuts whole in their shells but have heard that especially almonds are treated in some way that prevents sprouting. Anyone know if that's true?
 
Posts: 92
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Maybe I try planting kidney beans gotten from the store along with my Jade bush beans.
 
Posts: 247
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
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I just bought soap nuts for the first time, and curious, asked the guy if you can grow them.  He said sometimes you find the seeds left in with the husks (which is what you use for washing) delved around and came out with one.  So this is my new variation on the "grow your groceries" project!
 
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