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Re-purposing old hoses into pretty/useful things  RSS feed

 
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I came across these on my facebook feed (from Old Moss Woman's Secret Garden) All words in quotes are from her page.

"Hose mats are very portable and stackable steps that can help us not to slip in the coming muddy times."


"Recycled pallet gate with some happy"



"Well it won't hold water but isn't that wonderful when you rinse your produce on the way in or sort things that you will never find in standing water again."


A waddle fence! These look a lot easier to weave than sticks...


"I have seen this same design used rooftop for passive solar hot water."


"What an ingenious way to display vintage brass nozzles."


"This is way better than the hammock they bought me that keeps flipping me onto the ground. This could also be curved at the bottom for playing device for the tots."


How to wind it, but I wonder if there's something more eco-friendly than zipties to fasten it together?


What's green, holds water, and is pokey...


"Not to be overlooked are the safety adaptations. the split hoses make excellent edges for sharp and unforgiving edges near play areas. Old hose has saved many a vet bill as well."

 
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Exactly what I needed to know but hadn't known it until now.  
 
steward
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Thanks for sharing " Old Moss Woman's Secret Garden".

I like the hose mats idea for wet areas ... wish I had wet areas.
 
pollinator
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WOW - Thank you!    I sure am glad I didn't throw away a couple hoses last week when I got tired of the piles around here!    Love all those ideas and plan to do a couple :)
 
gardener
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I LOVE the gate!! Added that picture to my idea files :)
The "rag rug" out of hoses looks really interesting too, I may make one and see how it works for padding and traction. Rag rugs take forever to dry in my current climate if you let them get wet.
 
pollinator
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Nicole Alderman wrote:I came across these on my facebook feed (from Old Moss Woman's Secret Garden) All words in quotes are from her page.



Great thread!.

"Hose mats are very portable and stackable steps that can help us not to slip in the coming muddy times."




If a "bumpier" mat is acceptable, perhaps a framework of hose 'spokes' could be woven so that portions of the spiraled hose mat would become a 'knob' on the underside of the mat, much as a wicker basket would be constructed, except without the sides. Knobs would keep the mats from being moved around in high-traffic or heavyweight, damp areas like paddocks.

Using a soft collapsable hose for the spokes would make the job easier. Heating the vinyl hose at the weave-point. with a hair-dryer to soften it during weaving.


The 'depressions' caused by the hose could be filled in with dirt or clay.

"How to wind it, but I wonder if there's something more eco-friendly than zipties to fasten it together?"




You might try using plastic produce bags, twisted into a string, half-hitch knots to keep it all tight using a basket-weaving technique to use plastic-bag string 'spokes' that weave the hose together.






 
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I use old hoses split down the side to cover the edges of cattle panels.  The cattle panels make my hoop houses,  and the hose keeps the plastic from tearing on the sharp edges of the cattle panels.

I also use spilt pieces of hose to cover my saw blades.

Neither use is beautiful,  but they work great.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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