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Do NOT buy this book!   It isn't a book yet.  There's 87 pages of stuff, and maybe in the next few months I'll flesh it out a bit. Or maybe it will be years. We'll see.

During my last Kickstarter I offered it as a stretch goal. So I am putting it here for those folks. And, I figure, if somebody is willing to part with 10 bucks then they can look at an unfinished book too.

Format: PDF
No of pages: 87



$10.00

Hugelkultur: The Ultimate Raised-Bed Gardening ebook DRAFT
Buy access to this content
Seller paul wheaton
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pollinator
Posts: 244
Location: Pacific Northwest
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I skimmed it; most of this info I've heard Paul talk about before.  I like the section on toxic cardboard.  I've always seen this topic handwaved away "trust me it's toxic."  I wonder how much it would cost (or if it's possible) to have a few samples of cardboard tested for various toxins.
 
pollinator
Posts: 580
Location: Central Texas (Georgetown)
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Image: Intro: What do they look like?: Giant Fucking Earthworm:
image_giantworm01.jpg
earthworm illustration in color
earthworm illustration in color
scan_giantworm00.jpg
scan of earthworm illustration
scan of earthworm illustration
 
gardener
Posts: 2013
Location: Zone 8b North Texas
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I give this DRAFT e-book 10 out of 10 acorns.

Hügelkultur: The Untimate Raised-Bed Gardening ebook DRAFT by Paul Wheaton is a fantastic reference for those interested in dabbling in hugelkultur!  It includes notes of what he will be changing/updating in the future.  My personal hugelkultur knowledge has doubled after reading it.  Paul covers many different shapes, sizes and materials to build your hugel with.  Various examples share what works, and why.  Numerous projects are cited with relevant information to include in my project that will ensure it's success.

Paul includes a number of topics that clarify the "why" of his instructions.  Why build a hugel in this manner?  Why use this wood and not that wood?  Why does it matter if I use this soil over that soil?  Why will I not need irrigation after my first couple years?  In this thought-provoking book, Paul encourages us to experiment with our own hugels to find what works best for us...a completely Permaculture way to go!

For anyone who wants to build with hugelkultur, this is a must-have book to learn about hugelkultur and keep for your future reference.
 
gardener
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As many of us have heard, many others confuse hugelkulture with permaculture. You know hugelkulture and herb spirals and you’re doing it.

Sadly, some permaculturists with good intentions installed a hugelkulture bed in a demonstration garden in a public place.  The only problem is that we are in an arid climate, and it is near impossible to keep it watered.

It’s my opinion that in arid conditions the wood for the hugellkulture needs to be buried underground, then gardened on top of, or as a means of acidifying as well as moisturizing and fertilizing something like blueberries.

I’m hoping this information gets included in your book, so that the dry hugelkulture mound doesn’t get repeated enough times to become a bad example of how not to “hugelkulture”


Thanks
 
pollinator
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Thekla McDaniels wrote:As many of us have heard, many others confuse hugelkulture with permaculture. You know hugelkulture and herb spirals and you’re doing it.

Sadly, some permaculturists with good intentions installed a hugelkulture bed in a demonstration garden in a public place.  The only problem is that we are in an arid climate, and it is near impossible to keep it watered.

It’s my opinion that in arid conditions the wood for the hugellkulture needs to be buried underground, then gardened on top of, or as a means of acidifying as well as moisturizing and fertilizing something like blueberries.
Thanks



*Yes! I did my first hugelcultur berm two years ago. I dug at least a 18” down, filled it w logs & branches and then mounded leaves & soil on top. Let it sit one year & last year - after getting advice from all you Permies people - I planted it with a real mix of veggies to see what grew best…bush beans, kale, zucchini, pumpkins, tomatoes, milk thistle, peppers.
I agree that the top of the berm dries out & it needed some watering throughout the growing season. But I’m a fan of hugelcultur…it’s fascinating to create one, uses up logs & branches, and seems a healthy place to grow food. HARD work but worth it!
 
Tina Wolf
gardener
Posts: 2013
Location: Zone 8b North Texas
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Gaurī Rasp wrote:*Yes! I did my first hugelcultur berm two years ago. I dug at least a 18” down, filled it w logs & branches and then mounded leaves & soil on top. Let it sit one year & last year - after getting advice from all you Permies people - I planted it with a real mix of veggies to see what grew best…bush beans, kale, zucchini, pumpkins, tomatoes, milk thistle, peppers.
I agree that the top of the berm dries out & it needed some watering throughout the growing season. But I’m a fan of hugelcultur…it’s fascinating to create one, uses up logs & branches, and seems a healthy place to grow food. HARD work but worth it!



That is so cool!  I'm glad to hear those did to good!  I'm slowly building a hugel with fallen branches, old dying sod clumps (with lots of dirt pieces), covering it with some compost, and connecting it to my drip irrigation temporarily (this year, maybe next year).  I also have a couple buckets of compost I'll throw on the wood before the sod.  We eat ragweed in our salads...because we used to be allergic...so I'm planting that, tomatoes, beans, and a bunch of other stuff to experiment.
 
Posts: 19
Location: Northeastern Hungary, zone 7a
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Hi Everyone!

I am not American and I can't buy this ebook draft and other products. Is there a work around to this problem in general or should I just ask for other forum members to buy me X product, email it to me and I send them money somehow in return?
 
Tina Wolf
gardener
Posts: 2013
Location: Zone 8b North Texas
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Zoltán Korbel wrote:Hi Everyone!

I am not American and I can't buy this ebook draft and other products. Is there a work around to this problem in general or should I just ask for other forum members to buy me X product, email it to me and I send them money somehow in return?



Hi Zoltan!  Welcome to permies!  Are you able to buy pie?  If so, you can give me 3 pieces of pie and I will buy the book as a gift and send you the code via purple moosage.  Thanks, Tina
 
Zoltán Korbel
Posts: 19
Location: Northeastern Hungary, zone 7a
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Tina Wolf wrote:

Zoltán Korbel wrote:Hi Everyone!

I am not American and I can't buy this ebook draft and other products. Is there a work around to this problem in general or should I just ask for other forum members to buy me X product, email it to me and I send them money somehow in return?



Hi Zoltan!  Welcome to permies!  Are you able to buy pie?  If so, you can give me 3 pieces of pie and I will buy the book as a gift and send you the code via purple moosage.  Thanks, Tina



Allright, I'll send some pie your way Tina. Thanks for the advice!
 
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