• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • r ranson
  • Nancy Reading
  • Anne Miller
  • Jay Angler
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Matt McSpadden
  • Rachel Lindsay
  • Jeremy VanGelder

All the things from milk

 
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have been playing with cow raw whole milk. It is amazing the sheer number of products that can be made from it. It is also amazing how easy it is to make those products. Here is my list

Butter
Cream
Yogurt
Kefir
Cream cheese
Sour cream(yet to make it yet but it is yogurt using cream, not milk)
Whipped cream
Ghee
Whey
Buttermilk(have not made it yet)
Skim milk
Ice cream

Am i missing anything besides cheeses?  I have made all of the above items and added them to my " do not buy" list. While we have yet to milk a cow,  I can support the local raw milk producer.

Yesterday i made cream cheese. Very easy. That evening i was looking for a snack. I took some cream cheese and stirred in some maple syrup. I used that as a dip for whole pecan halves. It was good and satisfying.

The ghee, which is a liquid butter with a nutty taste is awesome. It has a higher smoking point than butter. For those that use butter for pancakes or eggs, ghee is very handy. Pouring it into the skillet vs dropping chunks of butter makes for a smoother cooking process. With the solids removed in the process it offers more lubricity to the pan. Not to mention buttering a roll with hard butter vs pouring a little ghee on it.
 
steward
Posts: 4837
Location: West Tennessee
2435
cattle cat purity fungi trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

wayne fajkus wrote:
Am i missing anything besides cheeses?



Ice cream!
 
pollinator
Posts: 3847
Location: Marmora, Ontario
585
4
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cheese, perhaps?

The first cheese I ever made was paneer for a saag paneer dish. Just warmed whole milk, then a little lemon juice to make it curdle, a cheesecloth and pressing between nesting dutch ovens, and it was done. There was some waiting time in between, but it was essentially an hour or two all-in, active time wise.

The pre-press stage produced a fine-curded cottage-style cream cheese, and there are several variations on simple cheeses like this.

I haven't played around with pressing and aging hard cheeses for lack of space in my tiny apartment, but cheese is so varied that it almost deserves its own subsection.

-CK

EDIT: I missed the part where you ask "anything besides cheeses." But my comments stand. It can be easy and infinitely rewarding.
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

James Freyr wrote:

wayne fajkus wrote:
Am i missing anything besides cheeses?



Ice cream!



Good one. Thats valid cause i make it and don't buy it anymore. A big miss on my part. Thanks!
 
pollinator
Posts: 520
Location: San Diego, California
97
forest garden trees rabbit chicken food preservation building woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In terms of getting into making cheeses, it may be helpful to separate out types for cheese based on difficulty of production:

Fresh cheeses like Ricotta and Mozzarella (and Paneer, like Chris mentioned - sounds fun!)
Soft aged cheeses
Hard aged cheeses

 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Kott wrote:

The first cheese I ever made was paneer for a saag paneer dish. Just warmed whole milk, then a little lemon juice to make it curdle, a cheesecloth and pressing between nesting dutch ovens, and it was done. There was some waiting time in between, but it was essentially an hour or two all-in, active time wise.



That is similar to cream cheese. Bring 4 cups of milk to a slight boil. Stir in 2-3 tablespoons of either lemon juice, lime juice, or vinegar. Wait a minute between each tablespoon while stirring constantly. It will curd and water will turn green. Strain the curds and blend it with about 1/2 teaspoon of salt until its a fine cream. No pressing. Pretty easy. It may be by favorite from the list so far.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 3056
Location: Tasmania
1824
7
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Milk is an amazing staple food. I love being able to make paneer, ricotta, or mozzarella, and use it as the protein part of a meal.

Cultured renneted soft cheeses are so easy to make, but cost a lot to buy at the shops, and homemade tastes better. I make mine in the same jar I strain the milk in to, just adding rennet and kefir, shaking the jar, and leaving it to set: https://thenourishinghearthfire.com/2016/07/18/an-easier-way-to-make-soft-cheese/

And hard cheeses to store the goodness of milk for winter, and just to make it an amazingly tasty food. A bit more of a process to make and store, but very satisfying to do.

And homemade ice cream is so tasty, much healthier than stuff from the shop.

Dairy is a big part of my homestead.
 
author & steward
Posts: 4753
Location: Southeastern U.S. - Zone 7b
2768
5
goat cat forest garden foraging food preservation fiber arts medical herbs writing solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
On your cheese list, don't forget whey cheeses!
Ricotta can include whole milk or be made from 100% whey.
Brunost (getost, mysost, and primost) are Norwegian whey cheeses that are uniquie but easy to make.
Ziergerkase is a whey cheese aged in herbs and wine.
 
gardener
Posts: 2490
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
816
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I often paneer as described above (except I use cheap white vinegar rather than precious fresh lemon juice. The vinegar or lemon juice isn't perceptible in the paneer after pressing). But I like the paneer better though, if I let the milk go slightly sour or yogurty before gently boiling it to make the paneer, and in that case less or no acid agent needs to be added. I like the flavour a little better than plain paneer, and it's better for people who are slightly lactose intolerant. Also, if milk is going slightly sour on its own, paneer is a good way to salvage it into something good -- but it still tastes exactly like the original soured milk, so if you find the soured milk yucky, you won't like the paneer it makes, but if the soured milk is just a bit yogurty and not yucky, you might.
 
gardener
Posts: 886
Location: Southern Germany
522
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wayne,
how do you make cream cheese? I guess you need quite a lot of milk. I have access to raw milk and good cream, so I guess that's a good starting point.

There are more regional dairy products in various European countries (and surely others, too).
In Germany, we have Quark as well and Dickmilch. Dictionary says Quark is curd cheese, but is not really storable for long time.
Dickmilch is a kind of sour milk that was traditionally made by leaving raw milk open to fermenting so it gets thick (dictionary says it is soured milk). I do have a ferment that helps with making it thick (not sure about the correct English term). I once bought it and use a bit at a time to add to milk before adding the rennet for cheese making. If I use more, I can make the soured milk which is milder and thicker than buttermilk.

Of all those dairy products, I love yoghurt and kefir most (both home-made), and when I have time I also sour cream and make cheese.
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anita Martini wrote:Wayne,
how do you make cream cheese? I guess you need quite a lot of milk. I have access to raw milk and good cream, so I guess that's a good starting point.



4 cups of whole milk. Raw or homogenized should work. As it starts to boil, add 3 tablespoons of lemon or lime juice. 1 table spoon at a time while whisking. Directions said a minute apart but i did not wait that long. As you whisk it, it will break into curds and a green whey. Strain out the curds. Put the curds in a food blender and whir away to a cream. Add about 1/2 teaspoon of salt while whirring. I'll look closer at the quantity next time. I'd guess it was half a cup.

After that i cooled it. Wasn't sure what to do with it. I ended up taking half of it and stirring in some maple syrup. We dipped pecans in it and it was very good. We did the same with the other half. I can see using this for spreads using different syrups. Strawberry, peach,  whatever i have made.
 
master steward
Posts: 11199
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6197
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Milk can be used to "poach" other foods, like fish, for example: https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/article/how-to-poach-fish-in-milk

I'm assuming you're allowing for things that contain milk with other ingredients. Oatmeal pancakes are popular in my house and calls for 2 cups of oats soaked for at least 10 minutes in 2 cups of milk before adding whole wheat flour, eggs, baking powder and a tiny bit of sugar, for example. Atypically, we serve ours with yogurt and fruit and only occasionally a bit of maple syrup, as I can't handle too much sugar.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1194
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Eggnog! :-)
 
Anita Martin
gardener
Posts: 886
Location: Southern Germany
522
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

wayne fajkus wrote:
4 cups of whole milk. Raw or homogenized should work. As it starts to boil, add 3 tablespoons of lemon or lime juice. 1 table spoon at a time while whisking. Directions said a minute apart but i did not wait that long. As you whisk it, it will break into curds and a green whey. Strain out the curds. Put the curds in a food blender and whir away to a cream. Add about 1/2 teaspoon of salt while whirring. I'll look closer at the quantity next time. I'd guess it was half a cup.



Thanks for sharing your recipe, Wayne.
This sounds like the Indian Paneer cheese that you can prepare without rennet. I have made a mashup of your recipe with one of my dairy book, i.e. using a bit of a milk ferment for getting the milk into a more acidic range, than adding very little rennet. I had also added some pure cream for a richer taste, to make it more like real cream cheese.
For both steps, I kept the pot on the radiator for about 2 hours each.

I then strained the curd.

Then I added one tablespoon each of Quark and a thick clump of cream, spices and crushed garlic and green peppercorns. The result is really delicious, we will have it with our dinner now.
cream_cheese1.JPG
[Thumbnail for cream_cheese1.JPG]
strained curd
cream_cheese2.JPG
[Thumbnail for cream_cheese2.JPG]
spiced up cream cheese
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Interesting. So what i made is not real cream cheese.
 
Posts: 44
Location: Northants, United Kingdom
12
3
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
More yummy treats and ingredients: clotted cream, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk.
You're welcome
 
Posts: 672
Location: cache county idaho
99
4
duck forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation bee woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dulce de leche!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11199
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6197
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mick Fisch wrote:

Dulce de leche!


Basically caramelized milk and sugar for us people who've never heard of it because we can't cope with that much sugar.

This recipe actually starts with fresh milk and sugar, not a can: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/dulce-de-leche-recipe-1948282
 
gardener
Posts: 5035
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
954
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you have a still you might be able to make cow milk version of arkhi, the mares milk vodka.
And Aqaruul is a dried curd,  like milk jerky!
 
pollinator
Posts: 168
Location: acadian peninsula, New Brunswick, Canada
145
3
trees books chicken woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There was woman from Lebanon who taught me about labneh. It's simple to make, keeps well and is delicious.

Bring some milk to a boil and let cool until lukewarm. Drop in a dollop of plain yogurt and set the mixture in a warm place. When the whole thing is yogurt then pour into a cheesecloth and leave to drain until it reaches the consistency of cream cheese. Form into balls and let dry some more in the refrigerator. Roll the balls on dried spices and store into jugs filled with olive oil. You're supposed to leave them alone for a while for the flavors to mix but I found it difficult to wait.
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I had an interesting outcome. Put yogurt in milk and it turns into yogurt. Put yogurt in heavy cream and it turns into sour cream.

This was my first try using raw milk milk. Not homogenized. I had it straining overnight. I went to put it in jars and it is sour cream. The problem is it is a lot of sour cream. I guess since the cream separates and floats to the top it grabbed onto it.

This was done without pastereurizing before hand.

In the future i will separate the cream out before making either. I think the cream content is so much more than what you get in storebought "whole" milk.

Picture makes it look like butter but it is white.
PhotoPictureResizer_200110_182259849_crop_3024x3287.jpg
[Thumbnail for PhotoPictureResizer_200110_182259849_crop_3024x3287.jpg]
 
Posts: 47
Location: Sterling, OH
10
dog chicken food preservation bike seed homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Clotted Cream?  Saw it on "Edwardian Farm" and always wanted to try it.
 
pioneer
Posts: 396
Location: WV- up in the hills
97
3
hugelkultur personal care foraging rabbit books chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I had an interesting outcome. Put yogurt in milk and it turns into yogurt. Put yogurt in heavy cream and it turns into sour cream.

This was my first try using raw milk milk. Not homogenized. I had it straining overnight. I went to put it in jars and it is sour cream. The problem is it is a lot of sour cream. I guess since the cream separates and floats to the top it grabbed onto it.

This was done without pasteurizing before hand.



How much milk did you start with? Did you get both yogurt and this sour cream from the one batch? I have a Ninja Foodie pressure cooker/air fryer deely-bobber that takes most of the work out of making fresh yogurt. I'm betting it would do the sour cream just fine also, but I was thinking that if you got sour cream from what seems a hi-fat whole raw milk AND yogurt...   I apologize that I may not be making total sense cuz my head is just spinning with so many thoughts and research lines to follow for an upcoming move to a homestead wherever my daughter lands.... They/we are considering mini belted galloway cows to keep the daily "harvest" at a manageable level. Even for the possibility of being a combined total of 9 - 12 bodies.

On a slight tangent, who is lactose-intolerant? Can you drink raw milk without problems? I seem able to eat cheese, yogurt, kefir and sour cream with no problems and I think it must be the process of making these things that changes the lactose. But drink a glass of milk or have more than just a small dollop in my hot morning tea or coffee and I'll be running for the commode within a few short hours.  More than some may have wanted to know, sorry.
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 3073
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
817
2
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It was all sour cream. At this point i remove the cream from the raw milk. This corrected the problem. I make a gallon of yogurt and when needed i make 2 cups of sour cream from the cream.

I was usng the yogurt function on my instapot but now i just put it in a cooler chest once the temp gets down to 115. I use the saute function to get the milk to 180 degrees to pasteurize it.  The volume of the yogurt (1 gallon) holds the temps overnight to keep the small batch of sour cream warm.

 
Posts: 75
40
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Milk Paint comes to mind.
 
master steward
Posts: 14874
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4108
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here are some recipes that milk is a main ingredient:

https://permies.com/t/171499/Recipe-Sauces-Gravies

https://permies.com/t/215683/Pudding

https://permies.com/t/142559/Brazilian-Corn-Pudding

https://permies.com/t/142930/Brazilian-Style-Chocolate-Pudding

https://permies.com/t/144378/Margarita-Pie-Pretzel-Graham-Cracker

https://permies.com/t/150270/Recipe-Boston-Cream-Pie

https://permies.com/t/208764/good-recipe-potato-soup
 
gardener
Posts: 372
188
personal care foraging urban books food preservation cooking fiber arts medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One thing that can be helpful to know is the difference between mesophilic and thermophilic cultures. It can save you a lot of effort depending on the result you are after.

I am going to give the short version here (although it's a really interesting facet of milk fermentation to understand in more depth!):

Mesophilic cultures thrive at lower temperatures (mid to upper 70s F), which means that you can ferment without keeping the milk warm as you often need to do with many yogurt cultures. Kefir and buttermilk are two common examples. I just add my starter inoculant (1/4 cup to 1 quart milk) to my milk and leave it in the kitchen for a day and then chill it for kefir and buttermilk. I tend to use these more than yogurt because they are so easy, low effort and low energy, and I like a pourable texture generally.

Thermophilic cultures need higher temps to thrive (often around 110F) and many yogurt cultures are thermophilic. In my experience, these will give you a thicker final product than most mesophilic cultures, which many people like, but you do have to maintain a warmer environment for the milk to ferment well.

In making sour cream, I have used both a thermophilic  freeze dried "sour cream" culture - the result was more like Mexican crema - thick, viscous, tangy, lush, but with a lot more effort and steps  to produce; and I have used kefir or buttermilk as a mesophilic inoculant, mixing them into heavy cream and setting it out at room temp for a day. This resulted in super thick and tangy sour cream. Both are fantastic but I usually do the mesophilic one because it is so easy and dependable.

Sour cream is one of the most low effort to reward milk ferments I do, so I highly encourage everyone to give it a whirl, especially the kefir/buttermilk version!

 
Posts: 44
17
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

wayne fajkus wrote:Interesting. So what i made is not real cream cheese.



Here's an example for the cultured method for cream cheese: Gavin Webber's Cream Cheese.  It takes about 24 hours rather than the quick cheese you made.  
 
Katie Dee
Posts: 44
17
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wayne, I know a quite obscure use, but it might be helpful to someone (chicken house floor, maybe?).  Sour milk was used in Tudor England as a mud/lime floor additive and top-coating to increase strength and water resistance, according to the historians and archaeologists in this BBC production: Tudor Monastery Farm.  The entire thing is worth watching IMO, but the soured milk part is at 4:13:04 in the above video.
 
Posts: 40
15
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

William Bronson wrote: If you have a still you might be able to make cow milk version of arkhi, the mares milk vodka.
And Aqaruul is a dried curd,  like milk jerky!



William... I'm not finding anything looking up Aqaruul, milk jerky.  Can you give me a few more tidbits of info?  I'm intrigued.
 
Posts: 45
Location: Traditional Lands of Akokisa (Houston, TX, USA)
8
forest garden food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was thinking about this the other day, as the milk we have on hand is about to spoil...

What is y'all's "go to" thing to make with "old" milk?

I HAVE made both yogurt and paneer/queso fresco with "old" milk; the yogurt wasn't as tasty as the cheese was, and I suppose that was due to the addition of salt in the cheese. What's funny, is the whey doesn't carry over the hint of "offness" the solids have. (also, I seem to be very sensitive to the smell, bc others here will still use the milk straight, when to me the "offness" is far too noticeable to be pleasant thing to add to cereal)

thanks
 
master pollinator
Posts: 492
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
223
hugelkultur monies forest garden foraging trees books food preservation bike bee writing rocket stoves
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cottage cheese
 
pollinator
Posts: 227
Location: Eastern Ontario
92
cattle trees tiny house composting toilet wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Soap?
I know it can be made from goats milk.  Can it be made from cows milk?

 
pollinator
Posts: 105
Location: The soggy side of Washington
42
goat cat dog personal care duck books chicken food preservation horse wood heat homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cajeta. Maybe I spelled that right, maybe I didn't. It's Mexican caramel and sooooo goood!
 
Posts: 52
15
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Labneh.

Basically just strained /thickened yogurt. Similar to Greek yogurt but even thicker.

My Lebanese family enjoys it/makes it.
 
Posts: 3
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How about clabber & Scandinavian products like Skyr, Filmjolk, Viili & Tettemelk   or Balkan Kaymak.

Also "Brown Cheeses" made from reducing whey +/- adding extra cream.
Gjetost, Brunost, Mysost, Mysuostur.
 
Posts: 102
Location: NW England
27
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paint, glue, buttons, fibres, tooth remineralisation - under 'casein' in wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casein
 
pollinator
Posts: 127
Location: Near Asheville North Carolina
40
2
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Custard
Pudding

And you don’t eat it but paint with it - casein paint
 
Anthony Powell
Posts: 102
Location: NW England
27
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
All sorts of recipes involve milk, but some involve more than others..
Around here, west of the Pennines, you can't find Yorkshire Curd Tarts, which I enjoyed while in Hull. Example recipe (most involve bought curd cheese) https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/yorkshire_curd_tart_23874
Here we have to make do with the ubiquitous Egg Custard Tart, eg https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/custardtart_83910 - the more nutmeg the better!
We can buy canned rice pudding, but it's no match for milk, sugar and rice, with a dusting of nutmeg, done slowly in the oven - with a skin that, as kids, we used to compete for, and for the scrapings from the pyrex bowl. Lots of fancy recipes out there, wiping the bowl with butter the only extra our mum used.
 
pizza for tiny ad? tiny ad? Did you order a pizza?
full time farm crew job w/ housing
https://permies.com/t/178213/jobs-offered/experiences/full-time-farm-crew-member
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic