• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Paul Fookes
  • Tina Wolf

What's your best, most delicious way to cook potatoes?

 
steward & author
Posts: 35805
Location: Left Coast Canada
12503
8
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

(warning: earworm)

We're having a great year for potatoes in the garden.  But with every good thing, too much becomes repetitive.  What are your favourite recipes?

Mostly we boil them, then fry up the leftovers in bacon fat for a crispy breakfast.

Mint sauce is good.  Chop up the mint extra fine then mash it in some malt vinegar.  Use as a dressing with butter on warm boiled potatoes.

 
master steward
Posts: 11336
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6291
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Baked is a perennial favorite with me, but it's not exactly the time of year for that. I just put a bit of butter on them - nothing fancy.

If I'm cooking a chicken, I do so in a rectangular pan with a sturdy rack in it.  It is very decadent to roast some potatoes in the pan with the drippings... not so very healthy, but very popular with the locals! If I want fancy but easy, I can add other veggies like carrot sticks, daikon chunks and purple topped turnips, but I have to time adding them so they all come out cooked at the same time.
 
gardener
Posts: 983
Location: Málaga, Spain
344
home care personal care forest garden urban food preservation cooking
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a steel pot that saves water. Its lid forms a steam seal, so very little steam escapes the pot with the lid put on. In this pot, it is possible to cook steamed vegetables, just by addind a few spoons of water.
I tried to make steemed potatoes and they ended up tasting like the ones we cook in an open fire. The starch was turned into candy. That's the best flavour I can get from raw potatoes in my kitchen.

But the potatoes I like most are in a roasted lamb. The recipe is simple:

1 lamb leg (approx. 2 kg)
1,5 - 2 kg potatoes
2-3 tomatoes
1 bunch of pinions (this is the most expensive ingredient!)
1/4 cup of white wine (cooking grade)
1/4 cup of water
Garlic, persil, salt and black pepper at leisure
Some recipes use onions, but I dislike it here.

Make some cuts to the meat, cut the potatoes in wedges, cut the garlic very small or use a mortar, peel the tomatoes. Fresh persil is best, and it's beautiful over anything.
Put all the ingredients in a steel recipient. Some people like to bury the meat under the potatoes, some other like to let the meat over, which is prettier but requires to turn the meat in the middle of the cooking.
Then, it's 1h30m in the oven at 200ºC. The potatoes should be golden, leave them a few more minutes in the oven otherwise.
 
gardener
Posts: 502
Location: Winemucca, NV
270
3
foraging food preservation cooking fiber arts greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mashed.

Ok, this is super weird....so we attending a potluck dinner party and one person couldn't have any dairy and I was making mashed potatoes. So I tried Mayonnaise.  It is a definite yes. We've had them that way several times sense.
 
Abraham Palma
gardener
Posts: 983
Location: Málaga, Spain
344
home care personal care forest garden urban food preservation cooking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cat Knight wrote:Mashed.

Ok, this is super weird....so we attending a potluck dinner party and one person couldn't have any dairy and I was making mashed potatoes. So I tried Mayonnaise.  It is a definite yes. We've had them that way several times sense.



Congratulations. You have discovered the Olivier Salad ;)
 
Cat Knight
gardener
Posts: 502
Location: Winemucca, NV
270
3
foraging food preservation cooking fiber arts greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Abraham Palma wrote:

Congratulations. You have discovered the Olivier Salad ;)



All the recipes I'm seeing say Olivier Salad is like the potato salad at the Korean BBQ restaurants... basically creamy American potato salad with peas instead of pickles. https://www.hungryhuy.com/korean-potato-salad/

No, I mean boil potatoes with or without garlic, mash them adding only mayonnaise (and salt/pepper). (I'm sure Aioli would also work). Serve hot.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1609
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand (Cfb - oceanic temperate)
498
duck trees chicken cooking wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a hard time declaring a fave, but taking baked potatoes a couple of days later and grating them for hash browns is definitely up there. Fried in a mix of sunflower oil and tallow, with a generous sprinkling of salt. Skins are obligatory and so good when they get crunchy.
 
Abraham Palma
gardener
Posts: 983
Location: Málaga, Spain
344
home care personal care forest garden urban food preservation cooking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry, that might be a case of bad translation.

What we call "Ensaladilla rusa" (russian salad), which has been translated to me as "Olivier Salad", is a salad that has a base of mashed potatoes with mayonnaise. Common added ingredients are sweet corn, tuna, olives, green beans, But you can swap them for whatever pleases you (shrimps, pickles, pineapple, peas, cooked ham, roasted pepper, boiled eggs, palm heart, artichokes, ...), as long as it has mashed potatoes and mayonnaise, we call it "ensaladilla rusa". Without any of the other ingredients, I'd call it a very sad russian salad.
Then, there's a myriad of variations. You can leave the potatoes in dices instead of mashed which is a fashionable presentation today, but it doesn't change the flavour.
I once ate a deconstructed salad: the mashed potates were served separately, just for the sake of it :)
 
steward
Posts: 14956
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4118
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
French fries. By the way, today is National French Fry Day.

I also like to take cold baked potatoes, slice or cube them and fry them.
These might taste better than french fries.

Then there are scalloped or au gratin potatoes.

As mentioned above Potato Salad.

Another favorite is Favorite-Soup

potato soup

Potato Soup
 
Abraham Palma
gardener
Posts: 983
Location: Málaga, Spain
344
home care personal care forest garden urban food preservation cooking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This one is Portugal's pride: Bacalhao à Brás!

Fried grilled potatos, grilled onions, scrambled eggs or cream, and shreds of salted cod, in the oven.

 
pollinator
Posts: 4463
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
1199
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
DW makes "potato fries" in the oven.

Potatoes sliced into even rounds with a mandoline, coated in oil, laid out in a Pyrex pan at a 45 degree angle, topped with Montreal Steak Spice and Parmesan cheese. Absolutely freaking awesome!
 
pollinator
Posts: 288
Location: Western North Carolina - Zone 7B stoney
73
hugelkultur dog forest garden trees cooking bee wood heat homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Personally, I enjoy a crispy potato.  This is achieved by boiling them, but stopping way before they get done enough for mashed potatoes. Pull them out of the water, and the water will dry from them.  Then take these potatoes and put them on a baking sheet that had some olive oil put down.  Take a fork and smash the potatoes just a little bit. You just want to press down to break the skin and open the potato. You aren't mashing fully at all, rather you want to stop have potato chunks. This is why you need to stop way before mashed potatoes state.  

After pressed with fork, drizzle some olive oil, salt pepper and garlic on top (or season as you wish).  Bake at 375 until the potato edges get all crispy and such.  This recipe is a journey into different consistencies of food.  If you get a crispy skin with a nice delicate center, it tastes great. Again, the key is to not over boil in the first step. You still want a little bit of toughness after boiling, but just enough where the fork press dimples it nicely.

I apologize for not having more of a concise recipe, but this one is really by feel, and it can have many different variations.  In my opinion, this is better than baked or mashed potatoes, because of the crispy edges.  

Do I have another recipe? Will there's tons of potatoes recipes that I enjoy, but at the moment this is the only one that sticks out.  The others are simply ways that potatoes are tasty, but this is the one that I nearly drool thinking about.
 
William Wallace
pollinator
Posts: 288
Location: Western North Carolina - Zone 7B stoney
73
hugelkultur dog forest garden trees cooking bee wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Second to pressed crispy potatoes is a mayo potato salad with a bunch of dill.
 
pollinator
Posts: 131
Location: Near Asheville North Carolina
40
2
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cubed potatoes fried is lots of butter
And
Potato salad w lots of hard boiled eggs!
42579E56-BC01-461F-A73B-F2DFBA48F67B.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 42579E56-BC01-461F-A73B-F2DFBA48F67B.jpeg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 2442
Location: RRV of da Nort
655
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Although there appears to be many renditions, East Indian "Dry potato curry" is a fave of mine.  Spicy (but not too hot) flavorful sauteed potato chunks without being immersed in sauce..... more like savory breakfast potatoes.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
pollinator
Posts: 4463
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
1199
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I keep reading about proper English roasted potatoes, which apparently takes hours and transforms the humble tuber into something magical.

Anybody done this?
 
rocket scientist
Posts: 5918
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
2861
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Baked slowly outdoors in the Black oven. 225F for apx 2- 3 hrs
Brushing regularly with goat butter, garlic powder, salt, and pepper.

Kinda tough to do without an outdoor kitchen...

Also cubing them small and pan frying them with onions.
 
master steward
Posts: 7934
Location: Missouri Ozarks
4184
6
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thrice cooked fries (uses russets) - most definitely a do-ahead kind of cooking: First they're baked whole, skin-on, to just shy of fork tender, then cooled. Cut into wedges, and bake, to seal all the cut sides, which shouldn't really be smooth (this is where the russets shine!). Then, when you're ready to have them, deep-fry. Deliciously crispy corners, sides, and peaks, with tender middles... mmmmm...

Baby potatoes/fingerlings: boiled to fork tender, chilled, halved, and:
added to other salads;
mixed with blanched & chilled green beans, olive oil, minced fresh garlic, bacon, salt & pepper;
tossed with a little olive oil, salt, & pepper;
just by the handful.

Red or Yukon gold: roasted and:
mashed with roasted carrots, butter, salt & pepper (aka, 'hushput');
with corned beef&cabbage;
smashed somewhat chunky, with salt, pepper, & lots of butter;
vichescois(spelling, lol?)

Russets: baked in the jacket, split open, buttered, salt & pepper, and loaded with:
bacon, cheddar, sour cream & chives;
spicy, meaty chili, cheddar, sour cream, jalapeños, chives, & spiced black olives;
beef stew;
chicken&white bean chili;
almost any stirfry;
roasted veggies;
Sauteed asparagus, w/ garlic & a squeeze of lemon

(Sorry - I truly SUCK at narrowing anything down to a 'favorite' or 'best',)
 
pollinator
Posts: 1150
Location: Chicago
388
dog forest garden fish foraging urban cooking food preservation bike
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love pretty much any potato recipe, as long as they are not underdone.

For homegrown new potatoes, I like a really simple treatment to let their flavor shine.  Boiled to fork-tender then toss with good oil or butter, fresh herbs, and salt.
 
pollinator
Posts: 146
Location: Southern Ontario, 6b
79
cat forest garden food preservation cooking writing ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I do love a fresh baby potato boiled and just with butter but there are lots of other tasty options.

We make my grannies green tomatoe pickles and that is a great addin to mashed potatoes or potatoe salad. ( the pickles are basically just: green tomatoes, onions, pickling spice, salt vinegar and sugar, so not that exotic but works amazingly with potatoes)

Potato bread recipe

This is a pretty straightforward recipe for potato bread that is delicious. I've been making it regularly this past year. I'm just waiting for the fresh crop to come in since the spud prices are a bit steep here right now.
Potato doughnuts are also great and I love Scottish style tattie scones. They are even easier than the bread since there is no raising and they freeze really well and can be reheated in the toaster. Imho, they are best with cheese!
 
Posts: 42
Location: 7B NC, USA
8
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Potato latkes!!! Grate about 3-5 lb potatoes, coarse holes. Salt and put in colander over a bowl for 20-30 minutes to drain.  Meantime, heat up some cooking oil to fry them up and get the other ingredients ready for the batter. Grate a big onion (also on coarse) add an egg and a tablespoon or so of flour (you can leave this out too).  Press on the grated potatoes to squeeze out extra liquid. Add potatoes to egg mixture. Carefully tip out the potatoes juice so the white potato starch residue stays behind. Mix the potato starch in with the potatoes. Drop spoonfuls of this batter into the hot oil. Patiently wait until they turn golden then flips to cook the other side. Drain on a paper towel and keep warm on a plate in a low oven while you cook the rest up.  To serve - add a dollop of apple sauce or sour cream and eat! these can also be baked.  
 
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Expand your palette with ethnic recipes, like this Indian Samosa

4 soft flour tortillas, ot make your own dough, see below.
2 boiled potatoes, peel and cut into ½" cubes

1 tablespoon oil, plus oil for frying
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon red chili powder
1/4 cup peas, frozen and thawed works too.
salt to taste
1 teaspoon garam masala
1 teaspoon chopped cilantro

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
2 tablespoon water to make a paste

First peel and boil the potatoes until a knife slips easily into the flesh, but not so much that they are falling apart.  Cool, and dice.

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a pan. When the oil is hot, put in cumin seeds. When they burst, add red chili powder, potatoes, peas, and salt. Mix well, then add garam masala and cilantro. This is your filling. Set aside.

In a small bowl mix the flour, and water and make a paste. Cut the tortilla in half. Fold it into a triangle shape, place the potato filling in, and stick the edges tightly with the paste.

Heat about an inch or so of oil in a frying pan. Carefully slip the samosa into the hot oil. Fry until crisp and golden. Serve hot with cilantro/mint chutney or ketchup if you must.

I use flour tortillas instead of making my own dough, because I'm lazy, but you can get a recipe for the dough and see how to fold the half tortilla at Kanak's Kitchen
Go to 3:30 in the video to watch how to fold the tortilla/dough. If you're making your own dough, consider adding raw (not fried) cumin seeds to the dough.  I think it gives it more flavor.

Serve it with mint sauce. This one is from Manjula's Kitchen, which is one of my Indian cooking channels.

Make your own Graham Marsala by combining the following ingredients (more or less)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 ½ teaspoons ground coriander
1 ½ teaspoons ground cardamom
1 ½ teaspoons ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alloo ki Bhujiya (Potato Mix)

Fry a large, chopped onion in a big fry pan. When it turns golden brown add in two or three diced tomatoes and cook them together until it turns into a sauce. Add water if necessary.

Add salt, pepper, paprika, Allspice, or Graham marsala or all of the following ground spices: chili powder, cumin, coriander, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg --  about any spice you want.  Cut three potatoes into triangles pieces and add them to the pan along with some cut coriander and green chilies.  Move everything around...let everybody know each other. Then put the lid on and turn the stove on low heat...let it cook for about 15 to 20 minutes until the potatoes are properly cooked.
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Potato pancakes, from AllRecipes.com, but my grammie made them the same way.

Ingredients
4 large potatoes
1 yellow onion
1 egg, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, or more as needed
1 cup vegetable oil for frying, or as needed

Directions
Finely grate potatoes and onion into a large bowl. Drain off any excess liquid.
Mix in egg, salt, and pepper. Add enough flour to make the mixture thick, about 2 to 4 tablespoons all together.
Preheat the oven to low, about 200 degrees F (95 degrees C).
Heat 1/4 inch oil in the bottom of a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Drop two or three 1/4-cup mounds of batter into hot oil, and flatten with back of a spatula to make 1/2-inch-thick pancakes. Fry, turning pancakes once, until golden brown.

Transfer pancakes to a plate lined with a paper towel to drain. Keep warm in the oven until serving. Repeat until all potato mixture is used.
Serve with applesauce or sour cream or both.

They are also good cold or room temp as a snack. As a kid, I ate them for breakfast with bacon, lunch with soup or a salad, and dinner as the starch part of the meal.
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greek Potatoes
Ingredients:
6-7 russet Idaho® Potatoes, medium size, peeled, cut lengthwise in halves or quarters
1 1/2 cups chicken broth (see Recipe Tip below)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon dry oregano
1 tablespoon semolina (optional, but it does help to thicken the brothy bits and gives a bit of a sauce to the finished dish)
Salt, to taste
Directions:
1. Preheat your oven to 400°F.
2. Peel and cut your potatoes into halves or quarters. Place into a 9x13" baking dish.
3. Combine chicken broth, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and oregano.
Now would be the time to check for the saltiness of your liquid. Keep in mind, this is the liquid in which the potatoes will cook and they'll soak up all these flavors, so it needs to be well seasoned. If you taste it and it is too bland, add more salt.
4. Add semolina to the liquid, mix well, and pour over the potatoes.
Cover with foil and roast for 40 minutes.
5. Remove from the oven, take off the foil, mix the potatoes, and put back in the oven, uncovered for 20-30 minutes; until most of the liquid has evaporated and the edges are slightly crispy.
6. Remove from oven and let cool slightly before serving. Garnish with parsley and fresh lemon slices for an extra touch.
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Look also at the 1,700 or so potato recipes from the Idaho Potato Commission -- or something like that.

Idaho Potato Commission
 
Rachel Royce
Posts: 42
Location: 7B NC, USA
8
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you end up with leftover mashed potatoes you can make a Shepard’s pie or between layers mashed potatoes out a filling of grated cheese, onions and leftover fish (or canned tuna fish). Top with cheese and bake.  Or use your hands to make a ball of mashed potatoes then press to flatten a bit to make room for a stuffing such as curried peas, then close up the hole and sautéed in butter or oil.
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't resist.  Just one more and then I'll quit.

Jeera Aloo  (Cumin Roasted Potatoes from Bangladesh)

Ingredients

3 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tsp cumin seeds
½ tsp black mustard seeds
5 small potatoes, diced
1 tsp salt
½ tsp cayenne
½ tsp turmeric
½ tsp ground ginger

Instructions

Heat the oil in the frying pan until it almost reaches its smoking point.
Add the cumin. When the cumin seeds begin to pop, remove the pan from the fire and add the mustard seeds until they begin to pop as well.
Add the potatoes and the remaining seasonings.
Cook over the low heat until the potatoes are done. Enjoy!

This recipe is from a site called The Foreign Fork. There, the blogger has a collection of ethnic potato recipes from all over Europe.  Enjoy! https://foreignfork.com/potato-recipes/
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cat Knight wrote:Mashed.

Ok, this is super weird....so we attending a potluck dinner party and one person couldn't have any dairy and I was making mashed potatoes. So I tried Mayonnaise.  It is a definite yes. We've had them that way several times sense.



Aren't eggs considered dairy? Or am I mixing the supermarket aisles with the known science of allergies?

Anyway, try coconut milk or any other plant-based milk in the 'taters.  Add any spice flavor you like. It works for me.

 
Posts: 59
15
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How about Hasselback?  Take a whole potato, and cut it as if you were going to to make it into very thin slices, BUT don't cut all the way through when you get to the bottom.  You're left with a load of slices, held together at the bottom.  These are then roasted in a hot oven, with oil (although it works without) slivers of garlic and rosemary inserted between the slices, until the slices are golden and crispy.  Yum!
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Helen Siddall-Butchers wrote:How about Hasselback?  Take a whole potato, and cut it as if you were going to to make it into very thin slices, BUT don't cut all the way through when you get to the bottom.  You're left with a load of slices, held together at the bottom.  These are then roasted in a hot oven, with oil (although it works without) slivers of garlic and rosemary inserted between the slices, until the slices are golden and crispy.  Yum!



Place chopsticks or any other wooden stick on each side of the potato. Cut thin slices down to the stick. This way, you won't inadvertently cut through the potato, and because it's wood, you won't dull the knife. I can't get the classic Idaho russet potato here -- nor red potatoes or fingerlings or any other potato variety except whatever the standard is in Japan. Sigh.
 
steward
Posts: 21209
Location: Pacific Northwest
11639
11
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:French fries.


Douglas Alpenstock wrote:DW makes "potato fries" in the oven.



I'm another for team fries! (Apparently, fries are called chips in England. While our chips in America looks like England's crisps.) I slice them into big fry shapes, cover with butter or olive oil or bacon fat or other fat. Maybe a bit of salt and pepper and pop the in the oven at around 400 ºF. I let them bake until they are browned on top. Sometimes I flip them but often I don't. I often put them on a silicone mat (like these smooth 100% clear silicone mats that are pretty affordable), and other times I put them on an oiled baking sheet. The baking sheet makes them more crispy, but the silicone is easier to clean up.

Fries are quick and easy to prepare, and bake faster than a baked potato or smashed potatoes (my kids like smashed potatoes, too). When my kids were babies and I was nursing constantly and super hungry and unable to put my baby down for long, I'd just slice up a tray of potatoes into fries and pop them in the oven. Then I'd eat the whole tray by myself. Potatoes are one of the most vitamin-dense food out there and fries are easy to eat one-handed. I ate so many fries during that time!

There's a lot of foods I've gotten tired of, but never fries!

Another potato dish I make is hashbrowns, where I grate the potatoes, cover them with eggs (maybe throw in some chives, and salt and pepper), and then fry them in butter in a pan. It's a bit more labor intensive than fries, but it does give variety and use up those eggs we usually have too much of!
 
master gardener
Posts: 2320
Location: Carlton County, Minnesota, USA: 3b; Dfb; sandy loam; in the woods
1137
6
forest garden trees chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And if you’re going with fries (oven or fry), the best ones I've ever made were lightly fermented in kimchi juice for several days after being chopped but before cooked. Kraut juice or even fresh brine with a starter is fine, but kimchi juice fries are the bomb.
 
Anne Miller
steward
Posts: 14956
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4118
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Spudnuts or Krispy Kremes

These donuts are made from potatoes:

https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/mashed-potato-doughnuts-recipe

https://www.seriouseats.com/potato-doughnuts-recipe-5220154
 
Barbara Manning
pioneer
Posts: 194
Location: Nikko, Japan Zone 7a-b 740 m or 2,400 ft
46
2
cat home care cooking food preservation medical herbs writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Christopher Weeks wrote:And if you’re going with fries (oven or fry), the best ones I've ever made were lightly fermented in kimchi juice for several days after being chopped but before cooked. Kraut juice or even fresh brine with a starter is fine, but kimchi juice fries are the bomb.



Virtually anything goes with oven-fried potatoes. Here's another Greek recipe for oven-baked potatoes, but it could just as easily be Italian oven-fried potatoes just by swapping out the cheese and some of the spices. From https://realgreekrecipes.com/  The instructions are futsy but the concept is strong.  Par-boiling the 'taters removes some of the starch and starts the cooking process. It also gives more internal moisture to the fry, making the interior creamer.


Ingredients for about 4 servings
For The Greek Fries:

800 grams / 1.7 pound (3 medium/large) Russet, Yukon Gold, or Maris Pipers potatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 ½ teaspoons dried oregano (swap out for basil if you want a more Italian taste -- or use both for a pizza-like flavor)
⅔ teaspoon table salt

Serve With:
80 grams (⅓ cups) feta cheese (Swap out with parmesan or any hard, white, salty cheese)
lemon wedges (consider omitting lemon for Ital. fries)

Instructions
Peel the potatoes or leave the skins on if you prefer.
Cut the potatoes into ¾ cm thick ( ¼ inch) sticks. Place them in a cooking pot and pour 1.5L of hot boiling water over them. Put the lid on and let them soak and soften for about 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 200°C / 400°F.
Transfer potatoes to a strainer and give them a good rinse.
Let them drain for a few minutes and then transfer on paper towels or a clean tea towel. Pat them dry.
Cover a baking tray or baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. Toss the potatoes on top.
Drizzle potatoes with olive oil and sprinkle with the oregano. Toss and mix well. Lay them evenly making sure they're not stacked on top of each other.
Bake for about 20 minutes. Take them out of the oven and raise the oven's temperature to 220°C / 430°F.
Season the potatoes with salt. Flip and toss the potatoes to help salt spread everywhere. Again lay the potatoes evenly and place them back in the oven.

Bake for another 10-15 minutes or until crisped and colored to your liking.

To keep really crispy allow the potatoes to sit on the tray for 2-3 minutes after getting them out of the oven. Then transfer to a plate and serve topped with feta cheese and or any other topping like super thinly sliced red onion slices, minced or pressed garlic clove or cloves (if you can handle it), a few drops of red wine vinegar instead of lemon, toss with diced cucumbers or diced tomatoes, Kalamata olive slices, Cayenne pepper, etc. etc.

Dips: If you try the Pizza Fries, then fer sure, dip them in pizza sauce. Others: Blue cheese or any other cheese sauce, tahini, tazitiki, chili oil, mint, ketchup (ZZzzz....), etc.  You get the picture.

 
Posts: 35
Location: SE France
13
fungi trees food preservation medical herbs wood heat composting
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It’s baking hot here, near Grenoble France, opposite the Vercors mountains so hot dishes are a little difficult to summon up. However, two thoughts:
Potato soup with dill pickle added right at the end, otherwise the spuds get rock hard, served cold with a dollop of cream - heaven

Janssen’s temptation, not sure about the spelling, a generous layer of sliced spuds(I don’t peel anything),
a layer of caramelised sliced onions, a slathering of thick cream over the top finished with tastefully positioned anchovy fillets on top. I favour a star shape of fish.
No seasoning is required and as I like fast food, the spuds are par-boiled beforehand.
The dish with these magical ingredients is placed in a hot oven and is ready when you can no longer resist the urge or indeed the temptation to take it out of the oven to share the feast.
It is truly delicious and fabulous after a spot of hard graft, outside, in the winter.

Blessings to all from over here
 
Christopher Weeks
master gardener
Posts: 2320
Location: Carlton County, Minnesota, USA: 3b; Dfb; sandy loam; in the woods
1137
6
forest garden trees chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

It’s baking hot here, near Grenoble France, opposite the Vercors mountains



This is totally off-topic, so maybe it'll disappear after a while, but my wife's grandfather was a maquisard on and around the Vercors massif, though he was more on the Valence side (his unit was most commonly based in tiny Ourches, almost perfectly opposite from Grenoble). Anyway, I had to say something since I never run into someone who even knows where that is. :-)
 
Posts: 12
Location: NZ
4
2
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in NZ , an imigrant, so now I tag 'as' into my speech to emphasise what comes before, so here you go, EASY AS SAUCY POTATOES.
In a heavy casserole dish layer up the following.
Thick layer of butter
About 2cm thinly sliced potato
Sprinkle of flour- plain or gf
Salt and pepper and a lot of bits of butter or thin slices of butter :)
Keep going like this till your dish is nearly full, ending with butter on top.
Pour in enough milk to come 2/3 up the dish.
Put the lid on and bake at 180c till tatties are tender.
Take the lid off, bake until top is golden, you can add cheese if you like.
Extremely yummy.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
pollinator
Posts: 4463
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
1199
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Christopher Weeks wrote:... my wife's grandfather was a maquisard  ...


Continuing OT: Student of history here. I know what that means. I have family who went in on Juno.
 
Posts: 12
1
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My fav...I usually double the butter and thyme mixture.

Best-of-Both-Worlds Potatoes Anna
Vegetarian Times Issue: November 2005
Serves 8

4 T unsalted butter
2 sweet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced, ≈1½ lb
3 Russet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced, ≈1½ lb
1 t dried thyme leaves
1 t salt
¼ t ground black pepper
1 med leek, trimmed, quartered and white part finely chopped, ≈1¼ c
¼ c grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 425°

Melt 1 T butter in an 8" ovenproof non-stick skillet over medium heat.  Swirl pan to coat bottom and sides; set aside

Toss sweet potatoes with 1½ T butter, ½ t thyme, ½ t salt and ⅛ t pepper in medium bowl. Set aside

Toss Russet potatoes with remaining butter, thyme, salt and pepper in second bowl

Place one layer of Russet potatoes in overlapping circles on bottom of skillet

Sprinkle with leeks, and top with layer of sweet potatoes

Sprinkle with 1 T Parmesan

Repeat layering, ending with layer of sweet potato slices

Place skillet on burner. Cook potatoes 5 minutes over medium heat to brown bottom

Transfer skillet to oven and bake 45-50 minutes, or until potatoes are tender and beginning to brown

Set 9" plate on top of skillet.  Flip upside down to unmold potatoes. Slice into wedges and serve
 
Listen. That's my theme music. That's how I know I'm a super hero. That, and this tiny ad told me:
FREE Perma Veggies Book! - Learn how to grow the most delicious and nutritious food with the least amount of work.
https://permies.com/t/238620/perennial-vegetables/FREE-Perma-Veggies-Book
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic