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PEP Badge: Oddball

BB oddball - sand badge
 
master pollinator
Posts: 476
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
216
hugelkultur monies forest garden foraging trees books food preservation bike bee writing rocket stoves
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Submission flagged incomplete
Making Sourdough Starter in support of the BB for baking two loaves of bread. They're going to be sourdough. So first, I ordered sourdough starter from Heirloom Sourdough, a strain that was established in San Francisco in 1916 on the Wharf. I put the 14 grams of starter in a wide-mouth Mason jar with loose fitting lid, and added 28 grams of lukewarm (filtered) water, and let the starter dissolve for 20 minutes or so, then added 14 grams of all-purpose flour and 3 grams of King Arthur whole wheat flour, as directed by Heirloom.



I did this twenty years ago with Oregon Trail starter, a nineteenth-century strain you can still only get by sending in a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We moved several times and I eventually killed it through neglect. But even if the starter ended up being a ruse, my local airborne yeast will take over and make me a happy baker again.

If you want to see progress on the viability of the starter, I'll post a follow up message next weekend. At which time I'll probably be baking my 2 loaves of sourdough bread.

j

Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 1
Note: Not approved because of this note on the first page of Oddball: "Any projects that are in the Food Prep and Preservation or Gardening realm do not count here in Oddball."

 
Posts: 81
Location: Shenandoah Valley (Virginia) Zone 6b
39
homeschooling forest garden fungi foraging writing homestead
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We just bought our place last year. It's a 1930s house that had been neglected by the previous aging owners for at least the last ten years, probably the last twenty. So I'll post a buffet of some pictures and a description of the work that we've had to to do so far. My husband put in many hours of work and my dad and some friends of ours helped too, but all the hours I’m listing are mine.

I've spent at least 14 hours scraping off wallpaper in two different rooms. I should have just caved and rented a wallpaper steamer, but I'm stubborn and a cheapskate, and I didn't learn my lesson from the first room, because I did it again. We were just going to paint over the nasty wallpaper like we did elsewhere, but in both cases the most recent layer of wallpaper had not been glued well and it was billowing away from the wall.

I’ve spent about 2 hours filling in drywall holes with spackling and a scraper in several rooms.

The previous owners left a water leak going in the kitchen for the last 10 years. It took my husband five minutes to find the leak and stop it. And those 10 years of leaking destroyed 2 inch thick beautiful oak floors cut around 1927 from our local forests. Because of this and some other problems, we’re having to redo the kitchen. My husband tore out the floor, but we’ve both been tearing out the shoddy drywall, nails, and nasty insulation beneath. Plus an exhaust fan we found hidden behind the wall! I’ve spent at least 12 hours tearing out and cleaning up drywall.

I’ve spent at least 16 total hours painting over the nasty, oily wallpaper and blackened trim downstairs in one room and upstairs in 3 rooms. Oil primers, then top coats. Downstairs room with 9 ft ceilings, more than 10 x 10, so probably 360+ sq ft of wall. Upstairs, in the kid room, 8 ft ceilings, more than 10 x 10, so probably 320+ sq ft of wall. Plus our bedroom, 8 ft ceilings, about 15 x 13, so a little less than 450 sq ft of wall. It needed no wallpaper scraping (thank goodness!) and only paint. In his youth, my dad painted houses, so I’ve had a lot of help from him with many, many hours painstakingly painting the trim—something he actually enjoys.

(I do realize that one of the homesteading BBs is painting 200 sq ft of wall, but I’ll save the *other* upstairs room for that one.)

The previous owners left a nasty chicken house and a bunch of plastic bins and trash in the backyard. I spent about 4 hours taking down the chicken house, saving useful hardware, and carting away various other trash. Now it’s a lovely compost area and will become a garden bed this year.

Lastly, we got a letter from our insurance company that bumped up repainting the exterior wood siding on our house to the URGENT list, or we’d lose our coverage. Within a week, we scraped the flaking exterior paint, got together a 7 person work party, and we spent 7 hours that Saturday splashing a coat of primer over everything to get the insurance company off our backs. I spent 5 hours scraping paint that week, about 5 hours painting that Saturday (in between taking care of my six week old baby), and 2 hours sweeping and raking paint chips out of the yard. We still need to do another coat, but it got too cold before we could.

Yes, paint is not very permaculture-y, nor is conventional construction, but taking something neglected and making it beautiful and functional again is. And imagine if Otis has a neglected house?

In total, I’ve spent (at least) 60 hours doing work to renovate this house (so far).

Sorry this oddball post is so long! I figured one long post would be much less irritating than several. Hopefully that’s the case!

I didn’t take very good “before” pictures when we bought the place, so all of those are screenshots of a walkaround video I took, and might be blurry. Sorry!

I’m already doing the work anyway, so… whatever oddball points I get is totally okay with me.
D9E9E113-612A-48FB-B4C0-2B0D4D9342F6.png
scraping wallpaper
scraping wallpaper
8214174D-2848-49AD-8521-708EAFC394E5.png
before—a big gouge in drywall
before—a big gouge in drywall
A404B652-AE24-490C-911D-A7C7849739A3.jpeg
after—filled, primed, painted
after—filled, primed, painted
D55B4420-41B4-4578-AC64-87BDB8D26A60.jpeg
tearing out drywall—found a 1940s?? exhaust fan
tearing out drywall—found a 1940s?? exhaust fan
3565CE79-621E-415A-83B5-6827B2E85A5E.png
before—gross room
before—gross room
757BFA1D-B550-4B9A-826A-2704C3A7657C.jpeg
after mold removal, wallpaper removal, spackling, painting—nice room
after mold removal, wallpaper removal, spackling, painting—nice room
68DCB501-BB3D-4894-870E-94260C7A0994.png
before—can’t tell, but the wallpaper is coming off
before—can’t tell, but the wallpaper is coming off
4FB25DC3-BC53-4D22-B401-88A436C9A004.jpeg
after—nice room
after—nice room
57A77762-F3D0-4AD5-9C62-F5634D134E70.png
before—trashy chicken house area
before—trashy chicken house area
D4351A36-E7AC-497E-8B6C-26CB136D62CD.jpeg
after—nice compost area
after—nice compost area
B905B718-877D-48DC-B110-F0CC1C60C1AE.png
before—sad siding
before—sad siding
B026B78B-C27F-487C-AE02-0CD5218E44A1.png
before—sad siding
before—sad siding
22DF1A73-A06A-43CE-B013-38B5B8854039.png
before—sad siding
before—sad siding
506231BB-73DF-4999-97B8-F4CE1B1575B9.jpeg
during—scraping and painting
during—scraping and painting
08CCE2DC-59D9-456D-BDF9-6FE2DF783C9B.jpeg
after—much better—and there’s more on the other side of the house
after—much better—and there’s more on the other side of the house
IMG_4096.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_4096.jpg]
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.
Note: This conglomeration of work is certified for 10 oddball points.  Many of these activities are covered by other BBs (work party, painting).  Individually submitting pieces of work is easier on the certifiers and it's easier for you to show the before, during and after.

 
gardener
Posts: 1176
Location: Eastern Tennessee
517
homeschooling forest garden foraging rabbit tiny house books food preservation cooking writing woodworking homestead
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The pictures I am going to be using are limited here since so many of my 'in progress' photos were lost. I am pulling images from secondary areas that display some of the evidence of the activity and prove before, during, and after. This was a massive undertaking for me at the time we began last year to build a fully prepared garden.

I got a windfall of pallet rails that measured 2.5 by 4.5 feet rectangles. These saved me a lot of time and money when I was short on both after just purchasing the house on the prior October.


The pallet rails

There were 18 total that were laid out so that they formed a square with 3 additional beds in the center. I then dug out the ground so that each bed laid flat despite the hillside, creating steps down with each bed along the way. Once everything was level and even, I screwed it all together to ensure nothing shifted.


You can see the beds laid out in the background

Each bed was lined with dampened cardboard, then filled with a locally sourced blend of river soil and mushroom compost. I have complaints about the quality I received, but that's not relevant to the BB. The bed were wet down to ensure no odd erosion issues would occur before we began building the fence. Stakes were placed at intervals, hammered into the soil and screwed in place. Chicken wire was wrapped around the entire garden and a gateway was built. We didn't put much effort into the gate due to already feeling the crunch of time, but the rest of it was done painstakingly. Once we began planting, we added a few structures such as a climbing rig for the peas to grow up. Up the hill, a semi-temporary greenhouse was constructed until a more permanent one can be built in a few years.

All of this was done on off days over the course of a month and a half as time allowed. I was still way more out of shape that year from the previous 8 years of sedentary work. Had I been in the shape I am now, it probably would have been done in a weekend or two. Still, the garden was productive for us in spite of the late start on getting things in. This year, we're using the greenhouse to get an earlier start on seeds and will be doing a full re-build of the garden with the better funding we have available to do so. The existing beds will probably be moved somewhere else on the property as a set of experimental beds or for things like asparagus to be planted.

BeforetheGarden.jpg
Prior to anything being in place
Prior to anything being in place
Beds.jpg
Beds together
Beds together with the first already having cardboard, soil, and grass as mulch
GateandBeds.jpg
Up close after the initial gate entry was done
Up close after the initial gate entry was done
spentgarden.jpg
The garden after the year was over
The garden after the year was over
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 1
Note: “ Any projects that are in the Food Prep and Preservation or Gardening realm do not count here in Oddball.”

 
Posts: 58
Location: Central AZ
30
2
kids pig solar greening the desert
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Approved submission
Hey PEP-folks,

This is a fairly-odd oddball, but it was definitely in the spirit of "make stuff you have work for what you need".

I have: concrete form boards from jobs (2x6, various lengths), pallets, a 3/4 ton Chevy, Kubota tractor, and hogs.

I need: hogs taken to butcher.

So, step one is to buy a trailer to build a pen in the back of the Chevy.

Step two is to build a hog crate on a pallet for lifting them. So far, so good. Maybe 1.5hr of basic woodworking.

Step three is convince four hogs, politely if you please, to climb into a pallet-crate and be put in the back of the truck. This was about two and a half hours, and would have been improved with amusing banjo music playing in the background. It involved whey, sour mash, sight panels, several kids, the wife, and a lot of patience. But it succeeded.

Step four was to drive up to the butcher & drop off the piggies - they had a ramp, meant for lower decks. The pigs were pretty nimble, and got to enjoy a slide.

(Note, this effort was also noted in support of the "Commerce - sell something you grew..." badge bit here https://permies.com/p/2148436, but I am submitting the actual building of the crate & pen in this BB.)

So, using only what was on hand, we managed to get maybe 800lbs of piggie up into a pickup, and up to the butcher (one for us, three for friends). It also made me appreciate the simplicity of livestock trailers... maybe someday.

Total build time - 1.5hr. Not sure if loading time gets any cred for the BB, that was 2.5hrs. Thanks for considering!

Happy homesteading,
Mark
20230920_062642.jpg
Tools
Tools
20230920_061327.jpg
Post
Post
20230920_062637.jpg
One side
One side
20230925_092640.jpg
Step this way
Step this way
20230925_100928.jpg
Completed
Completed
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Tractor, crate, whey bait
Tractor, crate, whey bait
20230925_100917.jpg
Hogs loaded
Hogs loaded
20230925_155224.jpg
Aftermath
Aftermath
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.
Note: Certified for 1.5 oddball points

 
Mark Miner
Posts: 58
Location: Central AZ
30
2
kids pig solar greening the desert
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Hey PEP-folks,

Many of my prior BB submissions have yellowed photos, due to a Kapton tape patch over the busted camera of my phone (was crawling under a mobile home, rolled over a pebble in the wrong place). This got annoying after a while, or rather, after about 6 months... but I hate to replace phones frivolously, and the thing worked otherwise. Yes, I recognize that smartphones are nearly the definition of toxic-gick-consumer-electronics, but I accept that we all use them and the BB/PEP/SKIP system expects everyone to have one, more or less. Thus, I submit this phone repair as an oddball badge, expecting little for it, but recognizing that it's a sort of ultra-modern tool care, and better than chucking the thing and dropping $200 on a new one.

So, I finally looked up the replacement back cover for my Samsung S10e, and lo and behold, it cost about $17 on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08ZYJTHGF, which is an order of magnitude less than the phone, yay!

But the instructions started with "melt the glue in the back"... oh. So out comes the hotplate, which at least gives me thermostatic control (unlike my heat gun). 5min on the hot plate and have at ye.

Then the man on the Youtubes shivs it with a box cutter...oh. So they sent a little separator blade with the kit, and yea verily, it worked, though I can't say it was easy, and I hoped I wasn't jabbing anything sensitive on the inside. But the back came off (not without some damage, but it was the busted bit anyhow), the glue was more or less cleanable, and the new back has ready-made adhesive in it, so after carefully cleaning the camera and lens, on it goes. Squeeze it for a while to set the glue, and presto, it woke back up! The final photo is taken with the repaired lens (prior ones were taken with an old smartphone which I kept in the kitchen drawer for BB photos, but which lacks battery life & SD card space.)

It took me about 30min start to finish, though this was the first glued-back smartphone repair I had done. I miss the days when you could just open them mechanically.  But if it kept a phone from being annoying or e-waste, I figure it was time well spent.

Happy hacking homesteading!
Mark

20240319_202716.jpg
It was all yellow
It was all yellow
20240319_202504.jpg
Hotplate
Hotplate
IMG_20240319_201831635.jpg
Open sesame
Open sesame
20240319_202651.jpg
Busted stuff
Busted stuff
IMG_20240319_202400194.jpg
Yellow submarine
Yellow submarine
IMG_20240319_202410185.jpg
It's alive!
It's alive!
20240319_202512.jpg
I can see clearly now
I can see clearly now
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.
Note: Certified for 1/2 oddball point

 
Posts: 3
Location: Portland, OR
fungi foraging ungarbage
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hi y'all! this is my first submission and i submitted it to the oddball badge because i didn’t see anything specifically pertaining to shellfish harvesting in any of the other badge categories. If there’s another more appropriate thread i could post this please let me know!
Total time: 2 hours (45 minutes digging, 1 hour cleaning, 15 minutes cooking).
I harvested about a pound and a half (72) purple varnish clams, then cleaned them and made them into a chowder!
IMG_6095.jpeg
harvesting at the beach
harvesting at the beach
IMG_0723.jpeg
cooking the clams the first time
cooking the clams the first time
IMG_0730.jpeg
got about a cup of cleaned clams
got about a cup of cleaned clams
IMG_0745.jpeg
cooking the chowder
cooking the chowder
IMG_0749.jpeg
the finished meal!
the finished meal!
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mark Miner flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 1
Note: Hi Jess! This Oddball aspect is really not for foodstuffs - there is a note at the top of the thread "Any projects that are in the Food Prep and Preservation or Gardening realm do not count here in Oddball. ", so I would point you to the "Foraging" badges, where there is indeed a badge for fish, and it did get established that shellfish count! https://permies.com/wiki/111864/PEP-BB-foraging-sand-fish I am glad you could dig some tasty clams, just want to make sure they get put in the right bucket! (bad pun, sorry)

 
Whip out those weird instruments of science and probe away! I think it's a tiny ad:
NEW BOOK: Pawpaws: The Complete Guide to Growing and Marketing
https://permies.com/t/152725/BOOK-Pawpaws-Complete-Guide-Growing
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