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master steward
Posts: 8693
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2496
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I just got done with my "heat of the summer" job - Tiling the basement.  It had crappy carpet laid on an unflat concrete floor.  The missus removed the carpet so I don't get any credit for that.  The things I did (and am requesting points for) were:

  • "Surveyed" the flatness of the floor to sort out the high and low areas
  • Ground down the high spots with a diamond wheel (by the door required removing 1/2")
  • Filling in the low spots
  • Tiling the room (14' x 27' = 378 sq ft)
  • Grouting the tile

  • The biggest thing I learned on this project is that you should NEVER DO A HERRINGBONE PATTERN!!!   If you don't heed this advice, be sure to lay out the pattern every few feet to make sure you stay 90 degrees and that everything is in line.  Otherwise the mistakes compound more than you'd expect.  Halfway across the floor we were going to do a pattern change anyway and I was able to switch to a brick laid pattern which was much easier.
    Before.jpg
    Before
    Before
    Carpet-removed-(yellowish-line-is-carpet-glue).-Notice-the-high-spot-to-the-left-of-the-back-corner-below-the-outlet-.jpg
    Carpet removed (yellowish line is carpet glue). Notice the high spot to the left of the back corner below the outlet?
    Carpet removed (yellowish line is carpet glue). Notice the high spot to the left of the back corner below the outlet?
    Surveying-and-gratuitous-butt-shot.jpg
    Surveying and gratuitous butt shot
    Surveying and gratuitous butt shot
    More-surveying.-Knee-pads-are-awesome.jpg
    More surveying. Knee pads are awesome
    More surveying. Knee pads are awesome
    Ground-down-in-some-spots-filled-in-low-spots-on-the-right.jpg
    Ground down in some spots, filled in low spots on the right
    Ground down in some spots, filled in low spots on the right
    Lighter-color-is-the-filler-eyeballing-the-herringbone-pattern-layout.jpg
    Lighter color is the filler, eyeballing the herringbone pattern layout
    Lighter color is the filler, eyeballing the herringbone pattern layout
    Lots-of-grinding-by-the-door.-It-rose-up-3-4-in-3-feet.jpg
    Lots of grinding by the door. It rose up 3/4 in 3 feet
    Lots of grinding by the door. It rose up 3/4 in 3 feet
    Tiling-underway.jpg
    Tiling underway
    Tiling underway
    Sucky-herringbone-nearly-done.jpg
    Sucky herringbone nearly done
    Sucky herringbone nearly done
    Switched-to-bricklaid-pattern-moved-400-lb-wood-stove-onto-tile-to-keep-going-across-the-room.jpg
    Switched to bricklaid pattern, moved 400 lb wood stove onto tile to keep going across the room
    Switched to bricklaid pattern, moved 400 lb wood stove onto tile to keep going across the room
    Tile-all-down-Chipping-out-excess-mortar-to-get-ready-for-grout..jpg
    Tile all down! Chipping out excess mortar to get ready for grout.
    Tile all down! Chipping out excess mortar to get ready for grout.
    Grouting-(and-removal-of-excess)-underway.jpg
    Grouting (and removal of excess) underway
    Grouting (and removal of excess) underway
    Preparing-last-area-for-grout.jpg
    Preparing last area for grout
    Preparing last area for grout
    Grout-done-.jpg
    Grout done!!!
    Grout done!!!
    Grout-done-.jpg
    Grout done!!!
    Grout done!!!
    Grout-done-.jpg
    Grout done!!!
    Grout done!!!
    Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

    Wow! I certify this BB for 25 points.

     
    gardener
    Posts: 3041
    Location: Southern Illinois
    554
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    D.W.,  

    Looks good so far.  You sure were correct about the rocks in the ground.

    Eric
     
    pioneer
    Posts: 177
    Location: Chesterfield, Massachusetts, United States
    3
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    Eric Hanson wrote:D.W.,  

    Looks good so far.  You sure were correct about the rocks in the ground.

    Eric


    RIGHT!?!?!?
     
    Mike Haasl
    master steward
    Posts: 8693
    Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
    2496
    hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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    *Edited to move the primary build to Homesteading but keep the siding manufacturing here in Oddball*

    I'd like to submit making siding for my sugar shack (place where you boil maple sap).  This structure is a 14' by 34' pole building.

    For the wood siding, my first plan was to just screw it onto the building and cover the gaps from the inside with pallet boards.  Per the picture below, the gaps were excessive so I had to change plans.  I needed to cut straight edges on both sides of the slabs and they needed to be similar widths so the boards could run down the building in rows without jogging up and down.  So I screwed a piece of plywood to the flat side of the slab with an even overhang and cut that off on the table saw.  That gave me one straight edge.  Then I could flip it and cut the slab to the maximum width.  I used increments of 6.5", 7.5", 8.5" and 9.5".  I tried to keep one edge thin and the other thick so that I could have a bit of overhang as I installed the boards so that rain would shed off of them.  I made 55+ boards and needed all of them.  Once I did the siding I covered the trusses on the ends as well and trimmed the doors and corner posts with them.

    So this submission covers making/milling and installing the slab wood siding.  The rest of the build is in another BB.
    bones-of-the-structure.jpg
    Roofing going on
    Bones of the structure
    Plan-A-for-siding-is-a-fail.jpg
    Plan A for siding is a fail
    Plan A for siding is a fail
    Slab-wood-screwed-to-OSB-table-saw-guide.jpg
    Slab wood screwed to OSB table saw guide
    Slab wood screwed to OSB table saw guide
    Cutting-a-straight-line.jpg
    Cutting a straight line
    Cutting a straight line
    Nice-.jpg
    Nice!
    Nice!
    Flip-around-and-cut-to-width.jpg
    Flip around and cut to width
    Flip around and cut to width
    Making-these-took-forever.-(They-re-laying-on-the-syrup-cooker).jpg
    Making these took forever. (They're laying on the syrup cooker)
    Making these took forever. (They're laying on the syrup cooker)
    East-siding-on-west-not-on-window-screen-in-place.jpg
    East siding on, west not on, window screen in place
    East siding on, west not on, window screen in place
    West-side-going-up.jpg
    West side going up
    West side going up
    Siding-done-gutters-on-chimney-in-for-syrup-cooker.jpg
    Siding done, gutters on, chimney in for syrup cooker
    Siding done except for up top
    Soffit-done-trusses-covered-with-siding.jpg
    Soffit done, trusses covered with siding
    Trusses covered with siding up top
    Door-finished-with-trim-and-a-knob-.jpg
    Door finished with trim and a knob!
    Door, posts and trusses trimmed
    Staff note (paul wheaton) :

    I certify 32 points. I like the use of salvaged wood.

     
    Posts: 46
    Location: Zone 7a
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    Here is a 8'x4.5' ramp that I built for my patio. I'm posting it to Oddball rather than trying to fit it in Dimensional because of treated wood & painting.
    Staff note :

    Lots of debate among certifiers. At the beginning of oddball it says that if the certifier can find a nontoxic way to do the same job, you get zero points. A sloping paver/flagstone slope would do the same job. Maybe wouldn't work for your situation. Still, lots of cement, pressure treatment, paint. But it's a nice ramp. So 1.5 points are awarded.

     
    gardener
    Posts: 3170
    Location: Pacific Wet Coast
    1161
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    Kevin Harbin wrote:Here is a 8'x4.5' ramp that I built for my patio. I'm posting it to Oddball rather than trying to fit it in Dimensional because of treated wood & painting.

    Kevin, did you add anything to the paint on the decking to stop it from getting slippery when wet? (I tend to push safety first due to my history and my friends who have balance issues at times!)
     
    Kevin Harbin
    Posts: 46
    Location: Zone 7a
    46
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    Jay Angler wrote:

    Kevin Harbin wrote:Here is a 8'x4.5' ramp that I built for my patio. I'm posting it to Oddball rather than trying to fit it in Dimensional because of treated wood & painting.

    Kevin, did you add anything to the paint on the decking to stop it from getting slippery when wet? (I tend to push safety first due to my history and my friends who have balance issues at times!)


    Yes! The paint I chose was decking paint with grit in it. Even dry, the boards were too slick.
     
    pioneer
    Posts: 142
    Location: Washington State
    91
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    Here are my photos for your review for the Oddball PEP project.  For this project, I learned an entirely new to me (and little known) form of strap making and basket weaving.  It is called Ply-Split Braiding and you can learn more here.

    I learned:
  • how to make 4-ply cords using a drill, a Tibetan twister, and a Leonardo rope maker.
  • how to fashion the tool (a gripfid) out of old knitting needles using a hand grinder.
  • how to Ply-Split Darn.
  • how to Ply-Split Braid using two methods/techniques to make belts, bands, and straps.
  • how to use Ply-Split techniques to make open weave baskets and bags.


  • Things I made:
  • over a dozen gripfids.
  • several thousand feet of cords out of paper raffia, cotton thread, wool yarn, and plastic grocery bags.
  • A Ply-Split basket out of cotton cords  - I discovered that the cords did not have enough structure/stiffness so it became a beach bag.
  • Two Ply-Split "Garlic Baskets" out of plastic grocery bags.
  • Ply-Split basket out of paper raffia.


  • I've included many picute below and these blog articles I wrote:
  • Making cords with a drill
  • Ply-Split Basketry


  • For reference, I spent at least as much time making each basket as it took to "weave a cotton hand towel" BB and about half that long to make the cords for each.
    1-Gripfid.JPG
    two gripfids I made
    two gripfids I made along with some cotton cords
    2-material.JPG
    plastic grocery bag - preparation for cord making
    plastic grocery bag - preparation for cord making
    2-cord.JPG
    finished plastic bag cord
    finished plastic bag cord
    2-Tibetan-Twister.JPG
    Tibetan twister in action - a cordmaking device
    Tibetan twister in action - a cordmaking device
    3a.JPG
    brown & white cotton cords - basket is about 1/4 finished
    brown & white cotton cords - basket is about 1/4 finished
    3b.JPG
    Brown & White Cotton Cords - Basket is about 3/4 finished
    Brown & White Cotton Cords - Basket is about 3/4 finished
    3c.JPG
    Basket becomes grocery or beach bag with longer handles
    Basket becomes grocery or beach bag with longer handles
    4a.JPG
    Plastic Grocery Bag "Garlic Basket" - 70% complete
    squat Plastic Grocery Bag Garlic Basket - 70% complete
    4b.JPG
    Squat Garlic Basket with a small coffee cup for scale
    Squat Garlic Basket with a small coffee cup for scale
    4c.JPG
    Large Garlic Basket with Long Handles - hanging on 36" tall cabinet door
    Large Garlic Basket with Long Handles - hanging on 36
    5a.JPG
    Paper raffia cords with basket 20% complete
    Paper raffia cords with basket 20% complete
    5b.JPG
    Paper raffia basket - complete
    Paper raffia basket - complete
    Staff note :

    Lots of certifier discussion. Some of this can go into Textiles at some point (cordage, cotton basket and raffia basket). Points dwindle rapidly on the second, third, fourth activity of a similar nature since PEP is biased towards learning experiences vs repeating a task. Based on photos submitted - 4.5 oddball points are awarded

    Staff note :

    Plus an oddball air badge

     
    master pollinator
    Posts: 1524
    Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
    474
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    Opalyn Rose wrote:Here are my photos for your review for the Oddball PEP project.  For this project, I learned an entirely new to me (and little known) form of strap making and basket weaving.  It is called Ply-Split Braiding and you can learn more here
    ....


    Wow, a new textile technique to learn! Thank you Opalyn.
     
    No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better. This time, do it with this tiny ad:
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