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Rediscovered Food  RSS feed

 
master pollinator
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I was curious if anyone has rediscovered some food that you love?

For me it has been simply toast and honey.

For years, I have loved toast and butter in the morning, but not surprisingly, my triglycerides are through the roof. I got enough health problems, so I started thinking about ways to cut back on my butter. (Not on my popcorn though, let us not get completely crazy here). So I have rediscovered toast and honey. The best tasting is to toast the bread on a frying pan on the stove, then spread on some honey..

But what have you rediscovered lately?
 
steward
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Yesterday, I made my very first Angel Food cake.  We wanted Strawberry Shortcake so when we went to the big city, I planned to buy an Angel Food Cake.  The big grocery store said they had it for $6.98.  I couldn't find one so I bought cake mix.  It was expensive though cheaper than a dozen eggs.

Another food item that I haven't had in a long time is Garlic Bread.

A hunk of French bread coated thick with butter, garlic and Parmesan cheese then toasted under the broiler.

Unfortunately, this is next to impossible unless I make some French bread.

Maybe I will just make some Garlic Toast.
 
pollinator
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I have rediscovered several foods. Most are a tribute/rememberance of Mom. Some are common, some are unique.

Cream of wheat. Milk based, not water. This takes talent to pull off. Its poured on a plate, not in a bowl. Sprinkle with sugar/cinnamon.

Pour mans breakfast. Melt crisco in a hot skillet. Not a lot. About the same amount as you would use butter to make pancakes. Sprinkle sugar on the skillet or on bread. Put bread on the skillet. Melt the sugar onto the bread til golden brown. Gotta keep things moving.

Potato pancakes is another.

Some of these are monthly, some i may do once a decade. They are forgotten then remembered.
 
pollinator
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Pies.
It started at Christmas when I made my family  tradition pumpkin/sweet potato pie(punkpotato!) that represents of my mixed race family.
I'd always used store bought crust, but not this time.
My mother can make a great pie from scratch,filling and crust.
I never could do a decent pie crust,  I always overworked them and ended up with something hard enough to cut glass.
At Christmas  I tried recipe for  "press in pie crust" and it works great!
Made a cherry pie, even used the same crust as a top crust by pressing between parchment paper and chilling it.
Took it to my brothers house for "tea".
He made brisket,  starting the night before.
Home made Cherry pie,  ice-cream,  melt in mouth brisket,  good times!

I find my self eyeing everything as potential pie filling.
When I've run out of butter, I switched to coconut oil and it's still good.
I'm going cheesecake next,  since they are actually cheese pies, anyway.

 
garden master
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I have rediscovered cottage cheese again. I had a cottage cheese phase, as a kid, and I'm loving it again. I liked to mix cottage cheese with all sorts of jellies and jams and honeys, but now, I've rediscovered cottage cheese with fresh or fermented fruits. I adore the tasty flavor of the savoriness of the cottage cheese, sweetness of fresh fruit, and the tangy sourness of my fermented fruits.
 
pollinator
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Banana pudding. As a kid it was with instant vanilla pudding and Nilla wafers.

Between going gluten-free and then whole food plant based,  I hadn't had it in years. But I have been experimenting with making vanilla Chia pudding and vanilla cookies and am enjoying the playing.
 
Travis Johnson
master pollinator
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Another rediscovered food I have found lately, is the lowly Tuna Melt.

Onto its own it does not get much fanfare, but I like to make mine now with homemade bread, then pan fry my bread on the stove, then in the tuna; mix in minced onion, carrot and celery. I heat this on the stove to get it warm, then mix in provalone cheese until its melted in. Then I mix in the mayonaise and spread it on the homemade bread. A nice bed of lettuce, and then several strips of bacon make this a true Tuna Melt!

It is not QUITE as good as a Rachel Sandwich, but darn close.

 
master pollinator
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Cornbread & grits. Almost entirely gave up all corn the past dozen or so years. That just wasn't working anymore so I found an affordable trusted source & stocked up.

Fresh sour dough & wheat bread but to a lesser extent. Only been a year but it so good to have that going again too.







 
pollinator
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I'll go all weird and ethnic on ya'll:  pierogies.

My maternal grandparents were born in Russia of German parents.  They immigrated to Canada in the 1930's speaking Russian as their first language and German as their second.  Of all the traditions they brought with them, one of the few that was passed down to the third generation was pierogies --- a kind of Eastern European ravioli.  It's a soft pasta dough rolled out, and then filled with either mashed potatoes and cheese, or if you want to get fancy, dry-curd cottage cheese (just the curds, not the whey).  You seal them up tightly at the seams and then boil them till the pasta is cooked,  You finish them by frying them for a minute or two in bacon and butter.  A few diced onions fried in the fat, some of the bacon bits . . . and you get the best heart-attack-on-a-plate you can imagine.

I hadn't had them in years, and I didn't think we could get the cheese curds to make them.  Then my Mom was in town and I asked if she'd make them.  They are a lot of work.  We found Queso Fresco at the Mexican market and it's almost exactly what my Grandmother used to use.

So for the last 3 years now, we make pierogies for Christmas.  I'll make a huge batch and freeze them.  Then we'll pop them out and boil them as needed.

One bite takes me back to childhood.
 
gardener
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wayne fajkus wrote:Cream of wheat. Milk based, not water. This takes talent to pull off. Its poured on a plate, not in a bowl. Sprinkle with sugar/cinnamon.



Mike Barkley wrote:Cornbread & grits.



Since I started using a pressure cooker, I've been making porridge sometimes, which I used to avoid, because of cleaning the pot. And I like it thick, which is hard to cook without stirring the whole time.

So what I do is, put an inch or two of water in the bottom of the pressure cooker, and then measure and mix the porridge, water or milk, salt, and any additional ingredients in a steel bowl. Stand the steel bowl in the water, close the top, bring it up to pressure, turn it off, and let it cool down naturally. Then I can eat it in the same bowl it was cooked in, and there's no chance of it burning and sticking. Much easier to clean!

For multiple people, Indian tiffins work great: stainless steel containers with a lid.
 
pollinator
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grits!

also, over the last year or two I have delved into my memory, back to when I lived near areas with large Chinese populations and was lucky enough to be able to eat good northern Chinese (hot! Spicy! noodles! pickles!) food featuring lots of fresh produce. Where I live now I can get the produce but have to make it all myself. Luckily it tastes just as good as I remember it, if not better because the produce is coming from my garden. Thank goodness for the internet!
 
pollinator
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Sourdough bread.

I have only been making it for a year. I always loved other people’s sourdough breads, but only this past year made a starter and began a journey into baking it myself. I haven’t baked with regular yeast in that entire time.
 
master pollinator
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Dead fly biscuits at my Gran's.
 
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It is my adoption of organic gardening beginning in the 70's which brought back my childhood food habits. When we visited my grandmother in West Virginia we ate food she'd grown in the garden! I was the oldest grandchild and so would be set at the table with a big bowl of green beans to string, or apples to core and cut up. Or she'd send me into the garden to pick blackberries or grapes. I probably picked up my love of gardens from her, and didn't mind the work, because the end result was some real good hillbilly country cuisine.

Now we grow stringless filet beans, have a little hand-cranked device to core and skin the apples, and grow varieties my grandma never heard of, but I do feel like I'm not only participating in something new, but also continuing to live with some very old traditions. Thanks grandma, and thanks to the ancestors.
 
Dave Burton
garden master
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I am also rediscovering the yumminess that sweet potatoes are. It has been a while since I have eaten a sweet potato, and I had one yesterday, with some nice warm butter. It was delicious! I had forgotten how yummy sweet potatoes are! They're almost like fruit, with how sweet they are, but they're also nice and warm!
 
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