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Favorite Terms of Endearment

 
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What are your favorite terms of endearment to call or be called?  Do you have any unique ones you are willing to share?
 
pollinator
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Depends on the dice roll in Scategories!

Best game ever.
 
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Kids get called / have been called:
Sprog
Sproglette
Squirt
Squirtle
Munch
Munchkin
But mostly these days, Snowflake but that's not really a term of endearment . . .
 
pollinator
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When I'm cold in bed and want my husband to warm me up, I call him meat blanket. Does that count?

Don't remember where it came from, but my husband quite often calls me rubber boot.

I guess we're not the most romantic couple. 😂
 
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kooka shamooka-mook
 
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I tried these on my future wife back in the courtship days, with limited success.

CalvinHobbes.gif
[Thumbnail for CalvinHobbes.gif]
 
pollinator
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I just stick with Dear. He however well he is also traditional and calls me Skat which in Danish means treasure, or tax. But of course in English scat means something else entirely, the first time he called me that I had to ask what the *?!+* he meant.
 
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Skandi Rogers wrote:I just stick with Dear.



I never call dear hubby Dear, I told him the reason is I am usually saying, "Deer!" As in watch out for that deer.

My parents didn't use terms of endearment and I don't remember dear hubby's parents using them either.

My mom's bigger pet peeve was when someone called her "Hon" because she said it was a term for German soldiers.

My brother-in-law used them excessively when we were in restaurants.  He called all the waitresses, "Sugar".

 
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we've spent the last 25 years calling each other "old man/woman" in several different languages, because it was funny.
Now that we are actually old it's time to look for a new nickname. Bitsy Pookums is a bit of a mouthful but I'm taking notes here otherwise.
(in this house, if either of uses the "normal" honeypie-darling-shmookie-etc nicknames everyone including the dog runs for the hills: that's a sign someone is pissed and the fur is going to fly)
 
pollinator
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"My Love"...

It is even how my spouse is listed in my cell phone address book, and every time he calls the phone announces 'call from My Love'.
 
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I must say I really dislike it when people I don't know call me 'darling'. I'm not their darling at all! Why do they do that!

My husband/dog/niece I call "poppet". I gather its a term for a doll. My headmaster at primary school used to call us all that and I guess it stuck with me.
 
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I have noticed that terms of endearment do have quite local flavours, especially comparing German ones to those used in the Spanish or English speaking world. Comparing those terms (and in general, rhymes, songs, tales) with other nations, I see that in other regions animals and especially bugs have a more negative connotation than here.

My husband and I call each other "Schatzi" (treasure), but many around us call their dears: Schneckerl (little snail), Käferchen (little beetle), Bärchen (little bear), or Spatzl (little sparrow).

Most common however I would say are Schatz(i) and Herz(ilein and similar), meaning heart or maybe Engelchen (little angel)
It is not common at all to call other people than your spouse those terms.
I did always use lots of terms of endearment for my own children and also to other children who were visiting. Some of them reacted very astonished as apparently they were not called that in their homes (or because that crazy lady just used those words, who knows!)
 
Anne Miller
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Tereza Okava wrote:we've spent the last 25 years calling each other "old man/woman" in several different languages, because it was funny.
Now that we are actually old it's time to look for a new nickname. Bitsy Pookums is a bit of a mouthful but I'm taking notes here otherwise.
(in this house, if either of uses the "normal" honeypie-darling-shmookie-etc nicknames everyone including the dog runs for the hills: that's a sign someone is pissed and the fur is going to fly)



Back when I was about 25, dear hubby started using "my old lady" when talking to his friends.  I was not going to put up with that so I put a stop to that kind of talk.

Now using that in a foreign language would have been a lot of fun.

Though dear hubby doesn't know any foreign language and I only know Spanish.

Mujeres viejas for women.

Anciano for old man, according to Mr. Google.

Though I feel we are long past trying that now.
 
Anita Martin
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Anne Miller wrote:
Mujeres viejas for women.

Anciano for old man, according to Mr. Google.


(Mi) viejo/vieja is mostly used for the parents, although there might be people out there who also use it for the spouse.

I do however know a couple of people who actually call their spouse "gordo/gorda" (or "gordi"), literally meaning fat - and it is really meant as term of endearment!
 
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I use 'my lovely wife'

I use 'bud' with my son sometimes.
 
pollinator
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We had a neighbour who taught the five year olds at the village school and she called the children "twinkle".  I would have loved to be called "twinkle" by a teacher when I was five.

Now I use it with our dog and he gets all wiggly and waggy.    
 
Anne Miller
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Anita Martin wrote:(Mi) viejo/vieja is mostly used for the parents, although there might be people out there who also use it for the spouse.

I do however know a couple of people who actually call their spouse "gordo/gorda" (or "gordi"), literally meaning fat - and it is really meant as term of endearment!



I don't remember the term from when we lived in Mexico as it has just been too long.

I remember my favorite song was "Besito Si Besito No" which is "Little Kiss Yes or No"; Beso being "Kiss".
 
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Favorite romantic terms of endearment I’ve been called:

Honey baby darling

Love Sponge (from Buju Banton’s song https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rND-XQsRSgw)


Non romantic terms of endearment are many as I nannied and taught for many years.
 
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