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great recipes for surplus eggs  RSS feed

 
steward
Posts: 3086
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
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Over at Serious Eats, they have a recipe for gluten free angel food cake!

It uses tapioca flour (or arrowroot), white rice flour, cornstarch and coconut flour, along with egg whites, sugar, baking powder, vanilla, lemon and salt.

I just made bow tie pasta carbonara for dinner tonight, and I warmed up the frozen peas in the little cast iron skillet I had used for the bacon bits. It was perfect - we ate it all up!

 
Posts: 329
Location: S. Ontario Canada
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Paleo breakfast muffins:

Oven to 350
Mix:
6 eggs
1/2 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup maple syrup (I use a bit less)
1 tsp vanilla extract (I use 2 tsp)
1/2 tsp salt

Mix well
1/2 cup coconut flour
1/4 tsp baking soda

Sift into the egg mixture
Fold in 1 -2 cups fruit
If using cut fruit like apples(my favourite) add a bit more flour, not needed with whole fruit like blueberries.
Original recipe calls for juice and zest of 1 lemon but I like it better without.

Divide into 12 muffin cups
Bake 40-45 min
 
master steward
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Location: Pacific Northwest
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I just had to come and say thank you for the Dutch Baby/Puff Pancake/Yorkish Pudding/David Eyre's pancake/etc recipe. I've been trying to find a way to get eggs down my pregnant, queasy gullet, and these sure did the trick! They were a big hit with my husband and son, too, who both scarfed them down with abandon. My husband decided they should be called "Eggy Bread." After seeing how many names this dish has, I don't see why he can't give it another!
 
master steward
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I just had to come back with two additional surplus eggs recipes. Paul and I loooove these!

Blender Hollandaise Sauce


(not my picture - it's from the recipe link above - ours is usually a richer golden color from darker yolks)

And, then you have egg whites left over. Oh, gee, what to do?! Meringues of course!

I make these Meringue Cookies, though with maple syrup instead of honey, because I heard it might not be so good to cook honey.


(again not my pic - it's from the recipe page above)

Both are epic awesome and decadent. So we haven't been indulging in these as frequently of late.

You're welcome!
 
Posts: 248
Location: Ellisforde, WA
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I made the spaghetti according to the recipe last week and then started tweaking. Hubby decided it would taste better with sausage rather than bacon, noodles rather than spaghetti, and romano/pamesan/asiago blend cheese. The sausage overpowered the other flavors. I liked the noodles. I only used 2 oz. of cheese(about 1/2 cup), next time I'll use more. I'd like to try it with pancetta. I used a cast iron pan and had it warm, added the noodles and eggs to the sausage in the pan and used that heat to cook the eggs.
 
pollinator
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Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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I eat several eggs per day, and never had any problem. According to my search, I would warn about 2 details I have found....

- Carbs are spiking insuline incredibly more ...when eaten with proteins in general and eggs in particular.

- Proteins are SENSITIVE elements, and cannot stand heat without being modified and less good for us.

So...
I eat eggs with other proteins and/or veggies only!
I never modify the color of an egg, not the consistency of the white.

Have you noticed how the white harden? It becomes like rubber....

So here is my daily routine....
- Put my unwashed eggs (I am in Europe...) in water for a little moment and then wash them.
- break them all in a glass bowl with lid.
- Take the yolks and put them in another bowl.
Use them separately. Eventually add yolks after cooking the white.

Basic recipe with shell, to show the difference with slow cooking:
- Put the eggs in cold water and bring to a very hot but not boil point.
- Let them stand there 1 mn more.
Result: you have to test if you really want at the same time white white and liquid yolk...
- Let them stand 10 mns in the hot water with no boild.
Result: HARD EGG! But feel the difference of consistency of the white!
And never any more this greenish ring around the yolk.
Instead of some mealy yellow green suff in a white rubber, you have good food!

Change in taste and consistency mean change in chemistry!

So, I use my first yolk in black coffee, no sugar. Put it in the coffee when it is not too hot, to not cook the yolk, and enjoy the joke with people: I play the magician! I come with a black coffee, show it and say I can turn it into "café au lait", by just turning with the spoon, and of course some magic concentration.... hehe, I break the yolk that is already there.... and just do it yourself to see how it looks like, and taste amazing!

Then try to just put the bowl with the whites in your bone browth or veggies. Turn off heat and let the lid on. Remove when white. It will be creamy!
(Try to do the same and let some boiling... and you have the rubber again...)

Then I do mayonnaise with some yolks. Mayonnaise is emulsified fat, and this is what your bile do, so you save/ease digestion with mayo. If you start your mayo in a plate with half an avocado, it is easy to do by hand. First mix avocado with some oil until you see no more enters, then add the yolk and extend it on top with the fork until the color lightens, then mix in and finish the mayo. For a desert, add smashed bananas, cinnamon, cacao and ornage peels to taste! You can even finish this mousse style with beaten whites, or add the coagulated eggs previously done in the bowl in hot water or steam.
 
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Location: Lazio, Italy
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Tea Eggs can have infinite variations in the recipe, during the summer you can reboil the eggs in their liquor briefly each day till they're gone (not trying to wipe out the permaculture network here) - after a couple of days they resemble metal eggs, a popular Taiwanese snack (especially common with quail eggs).
I also use duck eggs, they come out a bit harder but I still find them delicious ...
..the measures are in mixed metric...

20 eggs (shells scrubbed clean)
2  litres water (spring water if possible)
an egg sized piece of fresh ginger
"     "        "    amount of garlic cloves
A couple of dried chili peppers,
2 to 4 slices of dried liquorice root
a (small) head of star anice
5 or 6 cloves
a level tablespoon of Chinese five spices powder
30 grams of black tea
20 grams of green tea
150 cc (a small cup) light soy sauce
150 cc.                        rice wine

Put water on to boil in a pot with a lid
Heat a large pan or a wok adding a few drops of vegetable oil, to a medium heat
Slice ginger (thick wafers), add to pan and stir frequently
Bruise the garlic cloves (leave the tunic on)
When the ginger starts to dry out add the garlic cloves and stir, then add the chilli and keep stirring.
When the water starts to boil add the black and green teas cover and take off the heat
When the chilli start to blister add the liquorice root and star anice and stir.
Take an egg at a time and give it a sharp tap on the blunter end or prick it with a needle, then place in pan/wok
Drain the tea off into the pan with the eggs and other ingredients, reserving the leaves
Add 5 spice powder and cloves and heat for 20 minutes on a low heat
Take off the heat and cool for 20 minutes then cook for another 20 minutes on a low heat and cool for another 20 minutes...
Now the fun bit.......
Take out an egg at a time with a tablespoon and give it a series of sharp taps/whacks all over with the back of a teaspoon (6 - 10) and replace in the liquid
Add the soy and wine, also the tea leaves if you want, and cook on a vigorous boil for another 20 minutes.
Let the whole shenanigans cool down then peel and reveal your very own agate effect tea egg

Buon appetito
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Thank you Leah for the puff pancake mix recipe, and Jocelyn's history of the origin via Germany/Russia. I'll try them tomorrow. Our fridge downstairs in the storage room/basement is getting kinda full so here's what I do (other than giving eggs away)...

Flan: Brazilian, Puerto Rican, and some whacky ones like Yam coconut flan with a shot of whiskey on top when warming..
Creme Brulee
Frittatas of every sort
Hard boiled then pickled; we've pickled them in jalapeno juice, pickle juice, pepperoncini juice - good for two weeks
Bread: I use an egg per two loaves (which doesn't get me very far on the egg reduction) and kick out 12 loaves, then freeze.

When we're really hard pressed I'll start in mid-June to build our 'egg' reserves for when the girls slow down egg production in the fall & winter by freezing the eggs.

Whip together and for every cup of eggs add 1/4 t - 1/2 t salt or honey, label and freeze - good for six+ months. Then when it's cold out and we have the wood cook stove going (October - April) I can go crazy with cookies, cakes, and what ever else I can think of.

sheila

 
pollinator
Posts: 430
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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Some ideas
https://youtu.be/qEIRUWn_sFg
https://youtu.be/bTlcCvvUjl0
https://youtu.be/qLWlDSbxkVU
https://youtu.be/auXa8d9dF7s

Also, make a spanish tortilla - my frying pan takes 8 eggs to make a proper tortilla and between 4 people that makes a great lunch.
Also, dogs and pigs love them.

Yorkshire pudding!
Pancakes!
Boiled eggs instead of cake snacks!
Ok back to the washing up....
 
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I make different kinds of breakfast casseroles.  Most are delicious enough to eat for any meal and people love most of them. It's usually the most popular thing at pot lucks.
 
Posts: 339
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
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A very old recipe popular in Oz, probably inherited from the British Raj in India is Curried Egg - typically used as a cold sandwich spread (High Tea) or as a component in a selection of hors-d'oeuvres.

When served cold, the savoury flavour suits a hot climate - just add a G & T with a sprig of mint!

Recipes differ, but this one is REAL 'curry' rather than just mashing boiled eggs with a sprinkling of curry powder for taste:

This will make a good quantity. It can be frozen but is far better eaten fresh.

2 x large onions
7 x cloves garlic
1 x tablespoon olive oil
1 x level teaspoon salt
2 x large tomatoes
1 or more dozen eggs
Favourite curry powder or make your own

Finely slice the onions and tomatoes, finely chop the garlic. Keep separated.

Crack the eggs into a bowl and roughly break up with a fork. No need to whisk them.

Add olive oil and salt to a medium saucepan. Bring to a steady heat, add the onions put on the lid and reduce heat - sweat them until partially soft and add garlic. Gently turn the mix. Cook until very soft and sweet smelling.

Add tomatoes and cook the mix until the tomatoes have broken down to a pulp. Try to avoid adding water if at all possible - low and slow cooking.

Add curry powder and stir continually. If it's too dry, add a very small amount of water - some commercial curry powders are bulked up with flour.

Cook till the mix is well combined and the raw smell of the CP is gone.

Add the eggs and keep stirring and folding the mix on a VERY low heat until they solidify and well combined. If it's a bit watery, add a few more eggs.

The final result should be a relatively dry consistency - more crumbling than spreadable.

Immediately remove from the saucepan and refrigerate.

To serve:

It can be reheated and eaten with buttered toast for breakfast, brunch, lunch, whenever.

Spread cold on buttered bread with a good handful of thinly shredded ribbons of lettuce - oh, yum!

Even reheat and use as an accompaniment to a main curry course e.g. Chicken curry to close the loop!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
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Rick Kruszewski wrote:I make different kinds of breakfast casseroles.  Most are delicious enough to eat for any meal and people love most of them. It's usually the most popular thing at pot lucks.


Do you make them with bread or potatoes? Breakfast casseroles make me think of a "strata" made with stale or day old bread, eggs, milk, and cheese, plus whatever meats and veggies you like. They can be themed, such as Mexican, or Italian; or I've even seen Reuben themed strata recipes.

I can't recall the ratio of eggs to milk for the main kind of strata - I have it somewhere and might update my post later. Since you soak it overnight before baking, it was our traditional Christmas morning breakfast. Preparing it the night before makes it an easy thing to pull out and bake while other Christmas morning things are afoot.

I recently tried a vegan, GF version of this:
https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/raspberry-cream-cheese-strata/
I made it with some leftover, stale GF/DF/vegan biscuits and some vegan (almond milk) cream cheese from the store. It was not good. I think the GF biscuits made it too dense and I was trying to keep it low on the sugar. Ah well. Though I think this basic recipe could be a lovely, dessert-style (or sweet brunch?) strata - with the right bread, and/or served with a berry syrup on top.

I first read about a version of a raspberry or strawberry dessert strata baked in individual serving (white) ramekins for a Valentine's Day treat.

 
Posts: 18
Location: rural West Virginia
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I'm a little surprised not to see the two that came first to my mind--quiche (you can find a recipe--most call for four eggs) and potato salad. The potato salad is something my dad used to make in several versions because each kid didn't like a different ingredient. With everything left in, you boil potatoes chopped small, no need to peel them if they're homegrown or organic-- hard-boil eggs, peel and cool and cut the eggs into about 6 pieces each, add a gob of mayonnaise and a big shot of mustard, and small amounts of finely diced raw onion plus a good bit of chopped pickle, preferably both dill and sweet, and a little salt.
But mostly I wanted to say--if there are times you have too many eggs (I give a lot away) there are also times (November, December) when you have too few. The solution if you have a freezer, is to freeze the surplus in spring and use them in early winter. It took me a little experimentation to find what worked--ice trays did not. I had to half-melt the egg cubes before they would come out of the ice cube tray, then refreeze them--greasing them didn't help. What I do now is lightly beat two eggs (our typical breakfast is two eggs) in a 6 ounce plastic dip container, then freeze it. The next day I run a little water over the bottom of the container and within a minute, pop the frozen egg disk out. I then stack about a dozen of these inside a half gallon milk carton, with a plastic breadbag liner, twist tie that bag shut and duct tape down the top of the carton. Sometimes I have two of these in my freezer--each accounts for 12 to 14 breakfasts. But I need to remember to remove a disk or two in advance of needing them--though in a bowl on top of the woodstove, they don't take long to thaw. It's usually not too difficult to pry one disk loose--sometimes there is an easier gap two disks down and I thaw a couple at once, parking them in those same 6 ounce containers in the fridge till needed.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
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This picture from Akhu's post had Nicole asking about how to make paleo meringues.


I used this recipe from earlier in the thread:

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:
And, then you have egg whites left over. Oh, gee, what to do?! Meringues of course!

I make these Meringue Cookies, though with maple syrup instead of honey, because I heard it might not be so good to cook honey.


(again not my pic - it's from the recipe page above)



For the ones I made yesterday, in Akhu's picture, I didn't use any kind of pastry bag and simply spooned the meringue onto the (ungreased) silpat baking sheets. I probably got the meringue thicker by using the immersion blender whisk over the hot water (I use a pyrex bowl over a steamer pot set, not directly in the water) then transferring to the stand mixer and actually using the ice water as this recipe recommends. They had more of that traditional meringue dry crispness.

Here are some old photos from 2015 when my meringue turned out softer. I used to combine the method in the recipe above with the method in Two Ingredient Paleo Meringues (though adding the pinch of salt recommended in the first). I think I still used my steamer pot set to heat the egg whites (I did not put them directly on a low heat burner), though I'm pretty sure I never used the ice water nor switched to the stand mixer. These had the lovely benefit of turning out a bit softer and when the maple syrup oozed out it turned to chewy maple candy on the sides. YUM. I also did use a plastic bag with a corner cut off as a pastry bag for these.

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For Passover my family always made Matzoh Brie.This is made either with Matzoh or Matzoh meal which would then be called a pudding.You soak the Matzoh pieces in some water and drain them.You add whole eggs salt and pepper and maybe some diced fried onions and in an oiled or buttered pan, you slowly fry one side then using a large plate you flip it buttering the pan again.Cheese could also be added.I add some Philly cream cheese to the mixture.Good! If you make the pudding you could add some sour cream and sauteed apples  or make it savory with bits of mushrooms.Delicious!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
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That sounds very interesting, Stuart. I've never heard of Matzoh Brie.

Speaking of cheese or cheese substitutes, this is rather embarrassing now, though as a kid I loved Cheez Whiz. Cheddar cheese had too strong a cheese flavor for me. Ha! Though now, what I love sooo much more than Cheez Whiz is leftover Hollandaise sauce (recipe above). YUM.



It was my breakfast this morning on a homemade almond flour cracker.

 
garden master
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One of my favorite ways to eat eggs are soft-boiled eggs. I love the nice runny yolks!

 
pollinator
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My favorite thing to do with eggs is egg salad. My girls are still young-uns, so they don’t lay particularly large eggs.

4 hard boiled eggs
1Tbsp homemade mayonnaise
1-2 Tbsp sweet or dill relish
1-2 Tbsp sriracha sauce
Salt & pepper as desired

Slice a boiled, peeled egg with an egg slicer, then pivot halfway to slice perpendicular to the first time. Dump the egg off the slicer into a medium sized bowl. Repeat for all.
If you don’t have an egg slicer, just dice the eggs by hand with a sharp knife, then buy an egg slicer because they’re the best gadget ever.

Add all ingredients and stir. Change ingredients as desired (except for the eggs; you need the eggs for sure.)

To make the Mayonnaise:

This recipe requires a stick blender. If you don’t have one, you can still make it, but I’ll give you alternative instructions at the end.

1 egg
1 cup oil of choice. If you like coconut or other solid oils, you need a half cup, melted but not hot, and a half cup liquid oil (olive works fine)
1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar of choice or kombucha (you need this acid, chemically)
1Tbsp prepared mustard or wasabi sauce or sriracha (or strongly flavored condiment of choice)
Salt as desired. I just grind some in, but the Mayo is kind of tasteless without it, so omit at your peril. ;-)
Pepper if desired
Other flavoring agents, *dried* herbs, grated garlic, etc. Go easy on any liquids, though. They’ll thin the mayo. *Fresh herbs could introduce molds*

Technically you should use a pasteurized egg (see internet for instructions), but you do what you will.

Find a mason jar that your stick blender fits into. I have to use a wide-mouth one, and that means a quart size. Pour in the oil, then add everything but the egg. Crack the egg into a small bowl in case of egg shells, then pour it into the jar. It will settle to the bottom.

Without turning it on, place the end of your stick blender all the way to the bottom of the jar.
Turn it un, and s-l-o-w-l-y pull it upward as it blends. By the time it reaches the top, you have mayonnaise. It’s magic! Give it a few more plunges up and down to make sure everything is well mixed. TURN IT OFF BERORE YOU LICK IT. ;-)
If you think your mayo needs anything, like more salt or acid or sriracha... that’s okay. You can still add it. Just stir or blend it in.
If you have used dried herbs, their flavors will mature as they rehydrate.

Solely as a matter of academic interest, some people may add a Tbsp of active whey or other active culture source. They stir it in and allow the mayo to rest at room temperature (not hot, nor in the direct sun) for 8 hours or so and then refrigerate. I do not suggest that you should do this. It’s just interesting. I thought you might enjoy knowing it.

To make mayonnaise without a stick blender:

Thoroughly whisk together all ingredients except the oil. When all ingredients are completely homogeneous, pour them into a mixing bowl that will work for your electric mixer or your hand whisk. A round-sided bowl is better than, for example, a Pyrex measuring cup.

Put the oil into a spouted cup or bowl. Drip a drop or two in as you whisk. Do it again, and again, and again... Slowly, and briskly whisking all the while, you can increase the speed at which you add the oil, but at NO time should you just dump in a lot of it. Add the oil in a thin stream as you whisk. When you’re halfway there, you can speed up a bit more. Once the oil is all in, you should have mayonnaise. If you don’t. Use it as a salad dressing and try again when your arm is rested up.

The procedure for an electric mixer is the same, only easier on your arm. Use the whisk attachment(s) if available. Again, you can add flavor adjustments as above.

To make the boiled eggs:

I like to steam my eggs. I can’t tell you how long it will take on stovetop (I use my instant pot). It varies with your altitude and barometric pressure, and the size of the eggs, so you’ll need to experiment. I’d start with 10-12 minutes. If the eggs are a little under or over-cooked, they’ll still be good. Take notes for next time. You can use your veggie steamer, and you’ll need a good lid. The water should be just short of boiling. When it gets to that point, start timing.

Have the eggs at room temperature. Put a rack in your pressure cooker and put the eggs on the rack. A steamer for veggies works well. Anything that can take the heat and will let the steam through will work fine. You can set the pot to either “steam” or “manual” for 6 minutes. (Soft boiled: 4 min, medium: 5 min). Use the quick release method as soon as the time is up. I’m using my smallest eggs. If your eggs are significantly larger, you may need to go up a minute on all times. The pressure cooker evens out variables like elevation and barometric pressure. It’s a big deal for me because we’re at a mile up. The lower the elevation, the less important this becomes.

Whichever method you’re using, when the eggs are done, place them into a bowl of ice water. If you don’t have ice, just use cold water and change it out as it gets warm. Peel them as soon as they’re cool, pat them dry and refrigerate in an airtight container if you’ not using them right away. If you wait until later to peel them, they’ll most likely stick.

This method works well for fairly fresh eggs. Don’t try it with eggs still warm from the chicken and barely dry. Give them a few hours or better, days. If you need one, this is a good way to use your oldest eggs. They’re most likely still way fresher than factory eggs newly on the store shelf—unless you’re seriously drowning in eggs.
 
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