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How much do you charge or pay for fresh chicken eggs?

 
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We currently charge $3 a dozen. Our chickens have uncertified organic feed and a few hours of free range time each night...except when there is snow on the ground. This is what we have to charge so that they pay for their and own feed and we still get more than enough eggs from our own use.
 
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Location: DeSoto Missouri
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We live a little south of St. Louis Missouri.  My best friend has a little farm where she and her daughter treat their 20 plus chickens like babies!  They feed only organic and the chickens run free and look like they have a fantastic life!  I pay $6 a dozen but that's because I know cage free organic eggs take a lot to produce.  The feed is crazy expensive even when she is able to feed what she's grown herself.  She always has to supplement with organic feed and she's very picky.  She basically charges whatever people can afford to pay.  My elderly mother only pays $3 a dozen (my friend would give the eggs to Mom but Mom refuses to NOT pay).  Anyway, these eggs are extra large and taste like NOTHING I can buy in the store.  I've paid over $6 a dozen for cage free/organic at the supermarket.  It's well worth the cost for me just to know I'm feeding my family the very best that I can find.  The way I look at it, I'm helping my friend to be able to keep doing what she's doing.  It's not cheap and it takes a lot of her time to make sure her little farm is running status quo.
 
pollinator
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Here you can buy factory farm eggs for $.89 a dozen.  If you charge more than $1 a dozen for eggs, people won't normally buy them.  At the store, organic, cage free eggs are about $4-6 a dozen.
 
garden master
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Location: West Tennessee
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We charge $5 a dozen for our eggs and my wife sells them to her coworkers, and there's more demand than supply. We feed a certified organic ration that costs 75 cents a pound. The hens have really just gotten into the swing of abundant regular laying since march to where we have enough eggs to sell that pays for the feed and have enough leftover for ourselves. During winter when our chickens aren't laying we pay $6-7 for a dozen organic eggs from local folks at the farmers market.
 
gardener
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Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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We spend 15 dollars to get four dozen at a time. We could get one dozen from the same woman for 4 dollars. We tried duck eggs for comparison when we were first looking for pastured eggs and if we'd liked them better would have been spending 5 dollars a dozen for those.

We're pretty happy with getting this quality for this price. Everything from the thickness of the eggshells to the taste of the egg stands out as noticeably better than what I can pick up at work for cheap.

I suspect costs are kept down in my region because they can free range the birds for a large portion of the feed all year long. It does seem that most of the higher prices are from places with real winters.
 
pollinator
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San Antonio, going for upwards of $7 here--3.50 lowest I recall seeing for retail. I can't possibly pay. This is just not reality for me.

I really struggle a lot with this: that us po-mofos who really really think the right things can't afford to do the right things, while some rich dude slaps down a bill for eggs he has no inention of cooking just to make his fridge look full.

Also (just this one more thing, and I promise I'll stop bitching), labeling on grocery store eggs has just gone off the deep end--with "natural" this and "cage free" ("free range? range-free?) no-this and no-that, "omega 3 fortified", "vegetarian-fed", "local" or "GoTexan" here in Texas--a label shared paradoxically by Turkish figs....they've just got me walking out of there with my shoes on my head.

I can't remember what the hell I thought was good anymore. And I RAISE chickens!
 
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