Win a copy of A Food Forest in Your Garden this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Steve Thorn
  • Leigh Tate
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading

How much do you charge or pay for fresh chicken eggs?

 
Posts: 5
1
chicken food preservation bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We currently charge $3 a dozen. Our chickens have uncertified organic feed and a few hours of free range time each night...except when there is snow on the ground. This is what we have to charge so that they pay for their and own feed and we still get more than enough eggs from our own use.
 
Posts: 1
Location: DeSoto Missouri
books food preservation bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We live a little south of St. Louis Missouri.  My best friend has a little farm where she and her daughter treat their 20 plus chickens like babies!  They feed only organic and the chickens run free and look like they have a fantastic life!  I pay $6 a dozen but that's because I know cage free organic eggs take a lot to produce.  The feed is crazy expensive even when she is able to feed what she's grown herself.  She always has to supplement with organic feed and she's very picky.  She basically charges whatever people can afford to pay.  My elderly mother only pays $3 a dozen (my friend would give the eggs to Mom but Mom refuses to NOT pay).  Anyway, these eggs are extra large and taste like NOTHING I can buy in the store.  I've paid over $6 a dozen for cage free/organic at the supermarket.  It's well worth the cost for me just to know I'm feeding my family the very best that I can find.  The way I look at it, I'm helping my friend to be able to keep doing what she's doing.  It's not cheap and it takes a lot of her time to make sure her little farm is running status quo.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
96
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here you can buy factory farm eggs for $.89 a dozen.  If you charge more than $1 a dozen for eggs, people won't normally buy them.  At the store, organic, cage free eggs are about $4-6 a dozen.
 
steward
Posts: 4450
Location: West Tennessee
1953
cattle cat purity fungi trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We charge $5 a dozen for our eggs and my wife sells them to her coworkers, and there's more demand than supply. We feed a certified organic ration that costs 75 cents a pound. The hens have really just gotten into the swing of abundant regular laying since march to where we have enough eggs to sell that pays for the feed and have enough leftover for ourselves. During winter when our chickens aren't laying we pay $6-7 for a dozen organic eggs from local folks at the farmers market.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
259
2
forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We spend 15 dollars to get four dozen at a time. We could get one dozen from the same woman for 4 dollars. We tried duck eggs for comparison when we were first looking for pastured eggs and if we'd liked them better would have been spending 5 dollars a dozen for those.

We're pretty happy with getting this quality for this price. Everything from the thickness of the eggshells to the taste of the egg stands out as noticeably better than what I can pick up at work for cheap.

I suspect costs are kept down in my region because they can free range the birds for a large portion of the feed all year long. It does seem that most of the higher prices are from places with real winters.
 
pollinator
Posts: 149
38
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
San Antonio, going for upwards of $7 here--3.50 lowest I recall seeing for retail. I can't possibly pay. This is just not reality for me.

I really struggle a lot with this: that us po-mofos who really really think the right things can't afford to do the right things, while some rich dude slaps down a bill for eggs he has no inention of cooking just to make his fridge look full.

Also (just this one more thing, and I promise I'll stop bitching), labeling on grocery store eggs has just gone off the deep end--with "natural" this and "cage free" ("free range? range-free?) no-this and no-that, "omega 3 fortified", "vegetarian-fed", "local" or "GoTexan" here in Texas--a label shared paradoxically by Turkish figs....they've just got me walking out of there with my shoes on my head.

I can't remember what the hell I thought was good anymore. And I RAISE chickens!
 
pollinator
Posts: 208
Location: WNC 6b
53
hugelkultur
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In an effort to better price our eggs and considering expansion of egg layers . Have ya'll's pricing changed much? Do you calculate the  cost of producing eggs? or price the eggs according to market?
In Phoenix we sold a dz for 6$. Here in rural Western NC, there is much more competition. I'd like to get 5$dz. That's fairly reasonable considering quality eggs in the grocers can be $6dz.
What are your thoughts?
 
Posts: 1271
75
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
well its time for breakfast
the Walmart superstore gets $5 dozen for eggs labeled organic free range- check the newest organic regulations as to what that really means, I've seen locally small farms that produce eggs selling for $2 dozen

if you have some reading time here's the real organic series of stories
https://www.realorganicproject.org/media-news-articles/

there was a very informative report done a few months ago by bbs/npr about how huge corporations have hijacked the organic food rules and regulations to dominate in sales
wish I could find a copy of the story I listened to on npr

sorry for my rant on organics
 
Sena Kassim
pollinator
Posts: 208
Location: WNC 6b
53
hugelkultur
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
All good. The Organic labeling is rather soft. We are not concerned with labeling our egg cartons. Our practices are permaculture/biodynamics.

I'm curious to how other smaller egg sellers price their eggs. We are looking into getting 50 laying hens that produce around 30 dz of eggs weekly. Those numbers will vary of course. I base these number from current regs with the USDA and NC. If we have 50 or less hens we can offer/sell our eggs as ungraded. Now each state/county may have different regulations. Check your area.

We will track most expenses, cost of chicks, feed, bedding and then layer feed once the hens are out on pasture.

Just curious what everyone else's numbers are looking like.
 
gardener
Posts: 661
Location: British Columbia
494
2
monies home care forest garden foraging chicken wood heat homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in BC, I just increased my prices to $7/dozen for "beyond Organic". I sell out every week.
 
steward
Posts: 11593
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3242
3
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in a small town and I just match the organic grocery store at $4 per dozen.  Selling to friends so I'll probably only raise prices when the store does too...  
 
pollinator
Posts: 2068
Location: Denmark 57N
511
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not in USA but here organic eggs in the supermarket are $4 for 10 we used to sell at $3 for 15 for organically fed free range but not certified.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3842
Location: Toronto, Ontario
552
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I recently paid $7 for a dozen large at a Farmers' Market in a touristy spot. I know that I can get them for $4 a dozen from a local CSA.

-CK
 
master steward
Posts: 1236
Location: Coastal Salish Sea area, British Columbia
599
goat books chicken food preservation pig solar wood heat rocket stoves homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Around here, i have seen eggs for as low as 5 buck a dozen and up to 8 bucks a dozen.
The thing about our island is all of the food comes from the same feed store located on the island.

So to me the variation in pricing comes from how they are fed and how they are raised.

Some people are feeding organic feed and some are not.
Some are raised in a pen which is never moved and they are fed garden surplus.
Some have a larger pen which isn't rotated at all.
Some are raised in chicken tractors, which are rotated.
Some are raised with joel salatin style pens which are moved daily.

We go for the joel salatin style pen which is moved daily along with feeding them soaked organic feed along with organic layer pellets. They have their chicken pasture which is rotated thru and they do not see the same area for 30 days. In the winter they get moved into a green house and are kept warm in a deep bedding of sawdust. smells nice.

Anyways all of this to say

We only charge 6 bucks a dozen because they eggs are paying for them selves at that price. We get to eat as many eggs as we want and are able to have them pay for themselves. Win win!
 
master gardener
Posts: 3530
Location: southern Illinois.
1017
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation pig bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I give mine away to a Not For Profit Organization.
 
Posts: 14
Location: North Carolina
1
homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We get $7/dozen here(Organic, Soy-free, gluten free, pasture raised, basically the best you can get), I know there is a local couple getting $8.50/dozen for similar practices.
 
Sena Kassim
pollinator
Posts: 208
Location: WNC 6b
53
hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where about are you in NC? We live in Western NC and it seems eggs are going for about $4-5lb. We'd like to fetch a higher price since we pasture raise our hens organically.
 
Mike Smithy
Posts: 14
Location: North Carolina
1
homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
About halfway between Lincolnton and Gastonia, in Gaston County. We were selling them for $6/dozen at another market before we switched. The same eggs would go for $8-9/dozen in the stores and out this way you can't find them in local stores. I'd also recommend Reedy Fork Organic Farm for feed, out in Elon, they have pickups in western NC.
 
pollinator
Posts: 315
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
76
transportation hugelkultur cat books cooking food preservation bike building writing rocket stoves wood heat
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Average cost of Eggs here is $4.42. That's an average of everything from the el-cheapo factory eggs to the local organic.
Check your local average here

Other prices in Whitehorse (Canada)
The price of 2 liters of Coca-Cola in Whitehorse is C$3.06
The price of 1 pair of men’s leather business shoes in Whitehorse is C$164
The price of Microwave 800/900 Watt (Bosch, Panasonic, LG, Sharp, or equivalent brands) in Whitehorse is C$175
The price of 500 gr (16 oz.) of local cheese in Whitehorse is C$11

The eggs I buy are about $7.50 per doz. Local organic. I can't raise them myself that cheaply, yet we are getting 6 laying hens in the Spring. For the entertainment!
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do sell them with the cartons or the people bring there own we are finding the cartons are expensive
 
gardener
Posts: 5219
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1977
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tracy Combs wrote:Do sell them with the cartons or the people bring there own we are finding the cartons are expensive  

Welcome to Permies, Tracy!

Are you selling farm gate? If so, you can likely get away with reusing cartons and just putting your own label on them. We print simple labels on the computer that have our farm address on it, as that's a local regulation with the health department.

Our regular customers not only bring their old cartons back, but we put their names on them, so they get their cartons over and over again until they get old and ratty. These are people who do a weekly order with us,  so we know they will come on a certain day and have their eggs waiting for them.

We also find that people who don't buy our eggs often drop the cartons off for re-use.

However, when the epidemic started, things went weird and we actually ran out of cartons for the first time in years and not only are the cartons *really* expensive on our sort of scale, but we actually had trouble getting them. Once things calmed down, we're back to the "we've got too many cartons" situation!

We do reject any that look dirty and we sun-solarize many of them. We heat with wood, so any that are mucky end up being kindling.

I suggest you put the word out that you're looking for clean, re-usable egg cartons and see if you get results.
 
John F Dean
master gardener
Posts: 3530
Location: southern Illinois.
1017
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation pig bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Tracy,

Be sure to check out your state laws regarding cartons and the sale of eggs.  
 
pollinator
Posts: 1747
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
457
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have neighbours who keep happy chickens. They make tasty eggs.

I garden my brains out. I make tasty veg.

Each of us has surpluses in certain seasons. And we swap generously -- no quid pro quo, just sharing.

Naturally, in keeping with my reputation as an incorrigible scrounge, I keep an eye out for egg cartons at recycling depots. And they are available, regularly, and sometimes in large quantities. Clean as a whistle. I grab them with both hands. That's the place to look. My 2c.
 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 11593
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3242
3
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tracy Combs wrote:Do sell them with the cartons or the people bring there own we are finding the cartons are expensive


I went to our local food pantry and they had a stack of used cartons 300 high.  They get eggs and have to sort them to remove the cracked ones.  Thus they gain cartons and might be happy to give them to you.

Once people know you sell eggs, they will bring you cartons to be helpful.  It's never been a source of struggle for us.
 
gardener
Posts: 471
Location: In view of the Chiricahua Mountains, AZ
270
dog duck forest garden fish fungi chicken cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw this thread resurface recently... and realized that eggs haven't changed price where I have lived on the west coast US for years! My last post is the same price as I'm paying now for high quality eggs.

So there's something that hasn't gone up with inflation yet.

Once my husband and I get our house built and can start on our land, our goal is to attempt to grow enough food to cover a lot of the chicken feed cost.  And some duck feed.  We like duck eggs better, but chickens are so useful. As Geoff Lawton puts it, they can be the fertility engine of a small permaculture farm.  That scratching activity is quite valuable.

But my point is, for me, there is nothing like the eggs one raises on their own property.  I don't know why, but they beat all!
 
Story like this gets better after being told a few times. Or maybe it's just a tiny ad:
Pre-order for "Tour of Wheaton Labs, the Movie!"
https://permies.com/w/tour
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic