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What are some American foods that a European might have never tasted?

 
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John Suavecito wrote:

Anita Martin wrote:J (trout is of European descent and was introduced into the US).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_trout


Thanks for the link! The regular trout ("Forelle") I know is of European descent (hence Schubert's Forellenquintett) so I assumed you referred to the European one - which was indeed introduced in other parts of the world.

 
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Jane Mulberry wrote:Oh. My. Goodness! What is that!



Around Pennsylvania they're also known as walking tacos.

On the original question though... Pennsylvania Dutch scrapple.
 
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I'm grinning but... Never mind.
Here it comes ;
"cowboy supper"- pork & beans + hotdogs (not Frankfurt's)
Macaroni & cheese (hopefully NOT from the box. Yuck!)
Definitely a fruit pie (whichever type)
Turtle or alligator soup (legally obtained)
Moose, raccoon,  (or other North American unlucky  carcass of wild beast) sausage or a steak.
Baked good from wild nuts.
The really interesting meal would be prepared from....weeds! ha!
Bon appétit LOL





 
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Oh! That reminds me! Cowboy caviar! Yum!
 
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A bona fide New York everything bagel, from an independent bagel shop.  I will send some if you want.
A Philly cheesesteak.
 
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echo minarosa wrote:

The Colombian side of the family hates root beer. They said it tastes like toothpaste. I understand there have been root beer flavored toothpastes. I've never seen them. But they have mint in toothpastes yet mint is pretty much a food staple all over the place. Some have come around when given floats on extremely hot days.


I love mint; mint candy and mint desserts are some of my favorites. But when I was in China and Taiwan, most of my local friends thought mint candy (Altoids, junior mints, peppermint patties, candy canes, etc) was disgusting because they said it tasted like eating toothpaste.
 
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The opposite of me.  I stopped eating mint because it was all candy.  Sugar isn't really a health food.  Now I'm eating mint and leafy green vegetables at the same time, in one single food!.  It's actually healthy! Win-win.

John S
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American bacon in its common forms:
bacon.
bacon, lettuce, tomato sandwich
bacon cheeseburger
more bacon. there's also some eggs and toast if you'd care for some...

Hawaiian pizza.
 
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Anita Martin wrote:J
Other things that were mentioned like sweet corn on the cob, chocolate chips cookies, pumpkin and peanut butter can be found in most supermarkets and the cookies are prepared at home by many families.



I'm sorry, I've travelled the globe and no chocolate chip cookie sold anywhere in the world in any supermarket is anything like homemade. I wouldn't even consider them the same thing. A chips Ahoy or other packaged cookie bares very little resemblance to a homemade cookie--I would be though that there are bakeries and cafes in Europe with decent cookies, just as there are bakeries and cafes in the US with acceptable scones, strudels, and baklavas.

One of the things that irk me about living outside of the US is that people assume the packaged highly processed things are good representations of American food. A Mcdonald's hamburger is a very pale imitation of the burgers my parents made at home in our backyard. Dominos or Pizza hut can't hold a candle to a local pizzeria, nor are they supposed to be "Italian".

As for what I'd serve people, what I miss most about the US is delis where you build a sandwich to your liking. Choose your bread, your spreads, your toppings etc. And I DON'T mean subway! somewhere with good quality ingredients not somewhere trying to offer homogeneity.
 
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Melissa Ferrin wrote:

As for what I'd serve people, what I miss most about the US is delis where you build a sandwich to your liking. Choose your bread, your spreads, your toppings etc.



Funny you say this because I thought the UK was sandwich heaven.  Admittedly, we don't have great sandwich shops in my neck of the woods, but I have been to many a sandwich shop around the US. Maybe I'm missing something?

We stopped at a little sandwich shop on the way to Stonehenge, and years later I am still way more impressed with the sandwich than I was with Stonehenge, which turned out to be a roadside rest stop (no offense, UK people).  The sandwich, however, still appears in my dreams.  The best bread ever.  Toppings you wouldn't dream of in the US.  Soooooo delicious!  I think it may have been this place, but I am not 100% because it's been about 16 years, now.  I remember they had baskets filled with loaves just out on the counter,  vats of different olives, roasted peppers, cheeses. It was like walking into a place from the past.

Reeve the Baker
https://g.co/kgs/sDF4Fz

And then there's Boots. Of course, it can't be counted as a sandwich shop,  per se, but if we compare their cooler section to a US gas station, Boots wins hands down. For a few bucks you can get any number of things you'd have to go to a gourmet shop for in the US. As a veggie, I really appreciated that they had something along the lines of goat cheese + walnut + cranberry, if I remember correctly.  Beats soggy bologna or ham any day.  

I'm betting some of the shops in the NY area might be what you're talking about.  I need to get up there and find out!
 
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Melissa Ferrin wrote:
I'm sorry, I've travelled the globe and no chocolate chip cookie sold anywhere in the world in any supermarket is anything like homemade. I wouldn't even consider them the same thing. A chips Ahoy or other packaged cookie bares very little resemblance to a homemade cookie--I would be though that there are bakeries and cafes in Europe with decent cookies, just as there are bakeries and cafes in the US with acceptable scones, strudels, and baklavas.


Certainly nobody would deny that! This happens with so many things where there is a processed version to buy and a homemade version.
That's why I wrote that many people (including me) make them at home.
If you do a google search for German recipes for Chocolate Chips cookies you will get a ton of results ;-)
 
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Although I am a kiwi, I grew up with very British kinds of foods, and love American root beer floats.
Genuine root beer has an amazing depth of flavour. Yes it is herbal, And still magnificent. Worth a try.
hugshugs from New Zealand where it is fall, but we call it autumn.
Where today I planted Maori potatoes and kumara into the winter garden, to kind of have a funfun winter time, and getting ready for next spring.
Happy Spring to Yas all in the continental US.
 
Susan Mené
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M Rives wrote:You can never go wrong with Rocky Mountain Oysters...

Before I was hired my manager used to take visitors from Asia and Europe to Bruce's Bar in Severance, CO for this 'treat'. Fortunately, I'm still as curious about them as I ever was.



I had them deep fried with ranch dip.  Tasted like any other organ met to me.  
 
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Melody Goretti wrote:Breakfast burritos and breakfast tacos, complete with a selection of hot sauces, salsa, fresh pico de gallo. I’m in Texas, so that’s a perfect breakfast for me.
What part of the US are you in? If you’re up north, you’re not going to have access to gator tail (which I highly recommend if you can get it). No matter what you serve, let them know that’s what you eat in *your* region, and the rest of the US is basically a collection of different countries as far as local food culture goes. For instance, my chili (Texas style) is majorly different from the chili my grandma used to make (she was from Michigan). They’re basically different food groups. For home cooking, there are regional styles, not American style. Make a New Yorker angry by serving him Chicago pizza. Make a Texan cry by serving him sauce on spaghetti and calling it chili. New Mexicans serve enchiladas “Christmas style” but go across the border east or west and hardly anyone knows what that means. It’s all good, and it’s all American, but just make sure your guests know it’s not what they’re going to get if they drive in any direction for a few hundred miles.  



Hi!  The other New  Yorkers are lying to you!  Not a city girl; I live "out east" on  Long Island, but most people I know passionately adore that food of the gods: Chicago Deep Dish Pizza.  We crave it, we lust after it!  It's a different animal from New York Pizza, so no competition there.  
 
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don't worry about what they haven't tried, just prepare what you have on your farm.  maybe ask them what they want.
 
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What about a philly sandwich, and I'll double down on the BBQ, especially BBQ sauce, when I was in europe a couple of decades ago you couldn't find bbq sauce in any store.
 
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As others have said, US cooking is highly regional. I loath Chicago style pizza, to my mind that's not pizza. Love some kinds of southern food, hate others. The one thing that I've found Europeans confounded about is a PB and J, never mind the Boston speciality, the fluffer-nutter, peanut butter and marshmallow fluff. I don't understand why because obviously they eat nut butters and they eat jam. Sometimes they eat jam on meat and not in a marinade, as in a dipping sauce per se, and they think that we are weird, go figure. Don't even get me started on Marmite and Vegemite.
 
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I agree entirely that Chicago pizza is a whole 'nother animal--- how I think about pizza in Japan, or in Brazil. Interesting, but a different food entirely!

I have been following this thread for a while because as a "token American," consular volunteer, and person who generally loves to cook I often host dinners for people who have been away from the US as well as people who are profoundly curious. I've done a lot and since sometimes my guests include Mexicans and Syrians I tend to leave Mexican and Middle Eastern dishes off the menu for these events. One of the best dinners I ever did was BBQ- with cornbread (both kinds!), collard greens, slow roasted ribs, sweet corn, and some super crunchy fried chicken.....fresh cucumber and tomato salad.... it was glorious, and the produce was all from my garden.
Meanwhile, when I go to the US every year I focus on the things I can't get here, and root beer tops the list, along with the seasonal fruit and sweet corn (as much as possible). If you're near the water, whatever local folks do with the local seafood (clamboil! crawfish boil!) is always worth eating. Also local traditional ("weird") ice cream flavors.
 
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Trish Doherty wrote:

And, from the midwest....
Horseshoes, of course. Can't get any more Midwestern than that.  And please include a ton of old-church-lady casseroles.  Like tater tot casserole, green bean casserole, etc. And things like jello/pretzel salad for dessert.  Apples cored and stuffed with a mixture similar to brown betty topping and drizzled with caramel sauce then baked.



Never heard of the Horseshoe sandwich before. Had to look it up. Now I want one. :D

The dessert salads can be serious business. There's one with cottage cheese, pineapple, jello, and Cool Whip. There's another with Cool Whip, apple pieces and chopped up Snickers bars. Come to think of it...a lot of those include Cool Whip or something similar.
 
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Devil dogs? My sisters live in California and they don’t even sell them there.
 
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Dissolve a little gelatin into cream and whip it like normal whipped cream.  It was a nutritional issue I put my foot down on when I got custody of my nieces.  I consider cool whip a literal plastic and won't feed it to the kids.  My sister uses this instead and we haven't had to sacrifice our cranberry fluff during the holidays.

Actually that is probably an American food.   I don't know the whole recipe but unlike cranberry relish (which we can eat by the bowlful) this uses pureed raw cranberries, mini marshmallows, and green grapes cut in half.  It's the middle of the night here so I am not asking her what else.

Do remember to precooked any papaya or pineapple.   Raw they contain enzymes that break down a lot of gelling agents.  That's in issue if using them in cranberry relish also.
 
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Jane Mulberry wrote:A lot of these are alien food to someone in the UK!
However, corn chips, corn on the cob, hot dogs, and hamburgers are all eaten here now. And coleslaw and BLTs. Grilled cheese sandwich is definite;ly a thing in Europe, though it's a croque monsieur if it includes ham.


Yes, those multi-national fast-food chains made some American food known all over the world ... And the grilled cheese sandwich is known here in the Netherlands much longer (at least since the 1950s), called a 'tosti'.
 
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American foods that Europeans might not be exposed to? How about Canadian/American Chinese food--the 1970s version still available in cheap redneck venues and small town Chinese restaurants? Conversely: Haudenosaunee Soup (see bottom of web page) https://www.conflictkitchen.org/past/haudenosaunee/.
 
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American Goulash.
Shoefly pie
Proper New England Clam Chowdah
 
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Can you get Manoomin/wild rice in Europe?
 
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Persimmon pudding?
 
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Timothy Norton wrote:American Goulash.
Shoefly pie
Proper New England Clam Chowdah



Never had any of them:

What's the difference between American goulash and hungarian goulash?

Shoefly pie sounds a bit like gypsy tart but heavier, although not if it has crumbs in, then it is something else.

Shellfish would not be eaten by my husband!
 
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Christopher Weeks wrote:Can you get Manoomin/wild rice in Europe?



We can in UK. It is pretty expensive though, so I have only had it once. I'd love to try growing it here, but of cousre the seed needs to be fresh/wet to germinate.
 
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Jim Garlits wrote:Persimmon pudding?



Not something I've seen. I expect you can get persimmon, but I've not seen them, certainly not common.
 
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I'd love to try American pawpaw, fiddlehead ferns (mine are tiny still!), and real Mexican food (rather than what passes for it here). I have been known to indulge in a peanut butter and jam sandwich, surprisingly good! Cranberries make it over as a 'healthy' juice - supposed to be good for urinary tract - and at christmas as a sauce to go with turkey. I've never had huckleberries, or black walnuts. Not sure about root beer, it sounds like it isn't what it used to be.
I'm told your bread is very different, but I'm not sure why that should be!
 
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When I was a kid I went to visit my grandparents every summer.

Something my aunt fixed me while I was there was a carrot and raisin sandwich.

I bet not many Europeans have had a carrot and raisin sandwich and probably not many Americans, either.
 
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I’ve had carrot and raisin salad, but not sandwich.

Anne Miller wrote:When I was a kid I went to visit my grandparents every summer.

Something my aunt fixed me while I was there was a carrot and raisin sandwich.

I bet not many Europeans have had a carrot and raisin sandwich and probably not many Americans, either.

 
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If you liked the salad try putting that between two pieces of homemade bread with dressing spread on the sliced bread first.
 
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Nancy Reading wrote:
What's the difference between American goulash and hungarian goulash?



American Goulash

Credit to Spend With Pennies
Hungarian Goulash

Credit to The Recipe Critic.

Hungarian Goulash is more like an actual stew. American Goulash is the weirdest combination of elbow macaroni, ground beef, and tomato.

I never liked (American) Goulash but my grandparents would make it ALL THE TIME. I ate what I was served and was thankful for it haha.
 
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Timothy Norton wrote:American Goulash is the weirdest combination of elbow macaroni, ground beef, and tomato.


FWIW, I've never heard of that. But it looks and sounds sort of like Chili Mac.

ETA: I was wondering if this was a local/regional thing (I've lived several years or more in southern California, the Mid-Atlantic, and around the Midwest, and I'm into food, but didn't know about this 'American' dish) but the Wikipedia article makes it sound like a midwestern thing. It didn't exist in my circles in Missouri, Illinois, or Minnesota (around which I've lived, aside from five years out east, since 1979), but it's clearly a well-documented phenomenon, not just something they happened to serve at Tim's church or whatever.
 
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Cady Sharp wrote:Sharp cheddar Mac n cheese with onions and black pepper?

paul wheaton wrote:We have somebody here from england.  And we have had people here from all over the world before - but somehow I got a bee in my bonnet about what foods have never been tried.  Here is the list I have so far ...
And something that is a bit Missoula  -   veera donuts
Any other suggestions?



Your entry of donuts reminded me that our company 'hosted' 2 electronics engineers from Spain. I was elected to drive these two to companies where they could buy hand tool like those we used in our labs. On one of the trips down a major broad-way they spotted a large Donut sitting atop a building. They wanted to know WHAT that was. Have you ever tried to describe a Donut to someone who has never seen or eaten one? It was a riot with lots of laughter. I promised that I would come back the same way and we would stop and buy a dozen Donuts. Unfortunately the shop had already closed so I promised that I would stop on my way to work the next morning and purchase the dozen. They gobbled those down in no time at all. And, every morning after that they came in with a dozen Donuts for their breakfast, always with a very mixed variety. Within a couple of weeks they had tasted every type of Donut the shop made.
 
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I don't even know. Do Europeans eat mustard greens, turnip greens, and collards? What about Poke greens? I assume they eat kale.

John S
PDX OR
 
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John Suavecito wrote:I don't even know. Do Europeans eat mustard greens, turnip greens, and collards? What about Poke greens? I assume they eat kale.


I think all of those mentioned are less common than cabbage and spinach. The kale in the shops is mainly the tougher sorts like the lacinato kale, presumably because it travels better. I prefer the flat and tender leaves of my perennial kale and one which I think may originally have been red Russian kale that self seeds all over!
I don't think we can get poke greens. I suspect that headlines like "DEADLY POISONOUS POKEWEED IS ACTUALLY EDIBLE IF YOU DO IT RIGHT"  [(url=https://stoneageman.com/deadly-poisonous-pokeweed-is-actually-edible-if-you-do-this/]source[/url]) put people even like myself off trying it. It may even be illegal to sell it in the EU as a food stuff because of the poison risk, I'm not sure.
 
Nancy Reading
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Cletus Hatfield wrote:
Poke bowls
Spam fried rice



I'd like to find out more about poke bowls (it came up a lot on the internet when I searched for poke greens).

......I'm not sure I want to find out about "Spam fried rice" though!
 
Anita Martin
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John Suavecito wrote:I don't even know. Do Europeans eat mustard greens, turnip greens, and collards? What about Poke greens? I assume they eat kale.

John S
PDX OR


I would not know how to distinguish those without googling each.
Rübstiel/Stielmus is quite popular (but not in Bavaria) which are greens of a cruciferious vegetable.
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%BCbstiel
then farther north the huge green kale "palm trees".
...and of course in Italy Cime di rapa, in Galicia and Portugal the couve for the caldo verde etc.
Each country has its own version.
 
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