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stewards:
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master gardeners:
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gardeners:
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You know you're a permie when...

 
Posts: 81
Location: Shenandoah Valley (Virginia) Zone 6b
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Melissa Jones wrote:You know you are a permie when you get excited by seeing a mushroom in the yard after a big storm. I ran out to identify it, and was sad to find out it was a styrofoam ball that the storm blew from someplace.
I wanted a mushroom



We've only lived in our current place for a year, and I was so excited to see that some possible EDIBLE mushrooms were already growing on the south corner of our yard. We had two or three different flushes of them across almost a quarter of the yard!! Their mycelium must be running under the ground ALL over. I need to confirm edibility with a couple more sources, but I'm almost sure they are. So cool!
 
steward
Posts: 21209
Location: Pacific Northwest
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gardener
Posts: 504
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
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Back in 2000, I owned a coffee shop and a used bookstore. As a newbie to the coffee industry I found it intriguing that there were people out there who wanted my spent grounds. I couldn't throw them away, I'd get yelled at.

Marco Banks wrote:. . . when people look at your garden and say, "Oh, you got lucky -- you have good soil --- my soil is terrible", when you know that you had the worst soil in the neighborhood when you bought your place.


. . . when you visit Starbucks 50 times without purchasing anything, but the trunk of your car smells strongly of spent coffee grounds.

 
gardener
Posts: 1958
Location: British Columbia
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When you go to a yoga class and you're trying to relax but you keep smelling chicken poop. You convince yourself it's all in your head. Then you return home to realize you did have chicken poop on your tights because you decided to snuggle your new rooster before heading to class.

True story  ;P
 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 13900
Location: SW Missouri
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When your obsessions overlap...
I'm out removing Bermuda grass roots that have eaten a bed, decided I'm going to do the water flow differently, if I had something to edge this bed with that would help a lot. Has to be at least 16 foot long (cattle panel arbor involved) and big enough to stabilize the dirt edging, so maybe 6 inches tall.

WAIT! Didn't I drag from the graveyard behind us a big, long straight chunk of tree and put it in my "burn for biochar" pile that it has been too windy to burn? Why YES! Yes I did!

I'm going to harvest my biochar burn pile to stabilize the dirt for an arbor planting bed!

My obsessions are overlapping!

:D
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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You know you are a seed hoarder when.... you walk past seed displays at the stores, look at them all, say "I have better varieties of this plant than THAT!"  and "There's no way that will grow here, wonder why it's on the rack at all?" and walk away with nothing in your hands.
 
master steward
Posts: 11334
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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... you decide you *really* need to prune the grape vine by the front door. You pull up one vine that's lying on the ground, only to discover it's got roots. A decent collection of roots. Next I'm grabbing a pot and scrounging some dirt in the area and one baby grape vine is now in a sheltered spot on the porch to settle in. If it puts out buds, I'll have to decide where its forever home will be. We lost one in the field a couple of years back and the Muscovy like the fruit. Maybe I can combine aerial predator protection and grape vine supports in one structure... stacking functions!
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 13900
Location: SW Missouri
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when rot excites you!!
I wanted butternut squash for dinner, went out to the garage where I keep squash, picked up the first one I saw, oh ick! It splashed when it hit the floor. Sigh. Clean up, west garage...

So I went through the other milk crates, found several more rotting. Crap!!

Found a good one, took it and the container of sticky moldy dead ones back to the kitchen. Was cutting it to cook when I realized it wasn't from last fall, it was from the year before! It survived summer in the garage (which gets HOT!)  HEY!! I saved it's seeds! Yay, long storage squash! 1.5 years storage under iffy conditions!

Then realized at least 2 of the dead ones were from the same time, and fished through the muck to get a good handful of seeds to save, the rest will get put where I want squash to grow.

I'm excited by rotting squash!!
Not a line of writing you see often on the net....

:D
 
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wayne fajkus wrote:Your garden has weeds and you don't care



Or, rather: Your garden has weeds and you put up protective barriers so your free range chickens can't manage to eat them all!
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 13900
Location: SW Missouri
9367
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When you are willing to risk your tech because some things are IMPORTANT!
I had to dig my phone out of the dirt I was working in, I found it about 8 inches under. Why, pray tell, did I have my phone in my pocket while doing things it won't like? Because my friend has a new incubator, baby chicks hatching, and I was getting baby pictures and video!
Baby critters rock :D
Having to dig up your phone does not....

:D
 
Elise Villemaire
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Pearl Sutton wrote:When you are willing to risk your tech because some things are IMPORTANT!



Tragically I sacrificed my inherited phone just carrying way too much (ferment & treats & basket & coffee) to my morning chicken chores! Poor phone died of drowning in my barely warm coffee! Still haven't got it replaced months later. All my chicken photos of their chickdom two years ago lost!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11334
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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Speaking of important - I've not been seeing many bees around, so I was up on a ladder hand pollinating my peach tree this afternoon. Peach trees are marginal in this area, but there's nothing like homegrown, tree-ripened peaches - except maybe homegrown, tree-ripened nectarines, but we're not there yet...  I tried starting some seeds from a friend's tree, I even cold stratified them, but no luck. I'm thinking I should try rooting a branch? Or Air layering?
 
taco bot
Posts: 65
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...when you plant special shrubs that  produce tacos in all sorts of pretty colors!
 
pollinator
Posts: 4461
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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Jay Angler wrote:Speaking of important - I've not been seeing many bees around, so I was up on a ladder hand pollinating my peach tree this afternoon. Peach trees are marginal in this area, but there's nothing like homegrown, tree-ripened peaches - except maybe homegrown, tree-ripened nectarines,


Jay, that's seriously hard-ass. Tip o' the hat from me.
 
gardener
Posts: 667
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
474
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When you just realize that most of March was spent raising chicks and cleaning up after them, fiddling with the incubators, and ... Wait. Was that just about *all* I did?

When you group your favorite people by which of them is open to baby chick pictures, complete with video of little, just hatched, chicks. And you completely ignore the people who aren't open to being inundated with regular updates.

When your husband is supportive enough to show baby chick pictures to his coworkers and give up the dining table to the incubators for all of Spring and into the foreseeable future.

When, in one of the few times you weren't focused on chicks, you "borrowed' strawberry-sized rocks from your mother to paint red, in the hopes that your just planted strawberry plants will survive long enough to warrant worrying about the fruit they may or may not produce. I hope that red rocks will both condition my chicken helpers to leave the strawberries alone and provide subtle encouragement to the plants.
 
pollinator
Posts: 253
Location: Klumbis Oh Hah, Zone 6
73
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Friend/neighbor came over today to see the guitar I built. This is a guy I've tried (unsuccessfully) to talk out of putting chemicals on his lawn, into composting and planting native grasses (he shows interest but hasn't done either yet), and also coached him through some home improvement/DIY stuff, including basics like how to start a fire in your fire pit.

While we were down in the basement I showed him the grow station I set up for my wife. He goes "You guys are pioneer people!"
 
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wayne fajkus wrote:When you run outside when it starts raining, to see which way the water flows



Or you’re out there with a shovel directing the rain as it falls. Easier to dig 🤷🏼‍♀️
 
Kristine Keeney
gardener
Posts: 667
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
474
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When your neighbors just shake their heads watching you run out into a storm because you're taking the opportunity to use a garden fork to punch drainage holes in the compacted area your "helpful" neighbor mowed with his yard tractor while the soil was too wet. (gasp)

It's been a few years and I haven't been able to convince them to NOT now while the ground is soft, but they aren't mowing everything anymore. Some of the wildflowers survive.
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11334
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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...when you feel guilty pulling weeds from your garden to feed to the chickens/ducks. I *know* the treats will be appreciated, but it's too early to plant much and the weeds are protecting the soil and supporting the microbes.
 
master steward
Posts: 6539
Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland. Nearly 70 inches rain a year
3146
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You're too excited to sleep because you've been given an old polytunnel.

measuring up

Oh my! 47ft x 19ft and 10 ft high! Where to put it, what to do with the old polytunnel, how to organise watering, can I make a wicking bed, what about a pond, which plants shall I move and what new plants can I fit in....? Time to start a new project thread methinks.

It's not going to be a trivial job to relocate it, but it's rather a special gift.
Staff note (Nancy Reading) :

Started a new thread here

 
Jay Angler
master steward
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Nancy, that's a gorgeous gift! You *know* you're a permie when you think someone's cast off tunnel is the best gift ever!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11334
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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...when you talk to trees...  "Tree, please give me back my hat. I need it." I had caught it on a low-hanging branch. It didn't even occur to me to simply grab it back!
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 13900
Location: SW Missouri
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...when you obey your dragonfly overlords!

I walked out, and a dragonfly got in my face, then he flew down to where the kiddie pool pseudo pond was last year, danced on the dirt, came back up in my face. I am well trained in being ordered around by things, I went and got the pool, filled it up. Next time I came by, about 10 minutes later, the dragonflies had definitely found it.

Hey! Hey you!! Make the pool come back! We know you filled it up last year, make it come back!
I hear and obey...

One of these kind, I ID'd them once but don't recall their name.



 
pollinator
Posts: 1110
Location: Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
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Ann Marie Bess wrote:

wayne fajkus wrote:When you run outside when it starts raining, to see which way the water flows



Or you’re out there with a shovel directing the rain as it falls. Easier to dig 🤷🏼‍♀️



At Arosanti in AZ where I learned there was a name "permaculture" for what I was doing, the landscape coordinator mentioned how you can tell a permie because they run out into the rain to see what the water is doing. I still do it over a decade later.
 
master steward
Posts: 7929
Location: Missouri Ozarks
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Pearl Sutton wrote:...when you obey your dragonfly overlords!

I walked out, and a dragonfly got in my face, then he flew down to where the kiddie pool pseudo pond was last year, danced on the dirt, came back up in my face. I am well trained in being ordered around by things, I went and got the pool, filled it up. Next time I came by, about 10 minutes later, the dragonflies had definitely found it.

Hey! Hey you!! Make the pool come back! We know you filled it up last year, make it come back!
I hear and obey...

One of these kind, I ID'd them once but don't recall their name.





YUP!! For me, it's the humming birds! I didn't realize they were back, already - until they started popping up at the windows and KNOCKING on them! Okay! OKAY!! I'll Scrub up the feeders, and make the syrup! Sheesh!
 
Jay Angler
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Carla Burke wrote:YUP!! For me, it's the humming birds! I didn't realize they were back, already - until they started popping up at the windowed and KNOCKING on them!


My Hummers aren't quite *that* rude and demanding, but I was supposed to be working fast to get some watering done and there I was standing watching the tiniest Hummer picking at the old dog fur I put on the fence to discourage deer. She was persistent, but the old fur was pretty matted. It's on my very long list to put fresh fur out - not just for the deer, but for the Hummers as well.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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...when your spring cleaning includes putting away both your snow pants and your flannel petticoat until next fall.

:D
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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...when you accept chastisement from a bird.

I was pulling weeds, there has been a lady robin working with me. She's always about 8-10 feet from me, checking to see what I've dug up. I have a rock bucket that I toss rocks in, or at least toward it then pick them up. I tossed a rock, then looked over to see her all fluffed and chattering at me. "Why for you throw rocks at me?! I thought we were friends! Friends don't throw rocks at friends!"  

Notice that she did NOT fly away when that rock got too close to her. She stayed and yelled at me about it.  Hard to say what emotion a bird is experiencing, but it looked like baffled outrage to me.

I apologized to her...
 
Posts: 1
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
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... when you and the rock in your pocket herald the arrival of rain, preferring it over what the other people call "fine weather", because it means the things you grow for food or fun neither have to die of the dry nor be irrigated to kingdom come.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
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Location: Gulf of Mexico cajun zone 8
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... when the descendants of your original walking onions have walked to 9 gardens, 2 lawns, & 5 states in 5 years time.  Probably more because some were given to other folks to plant in their own gardens.

... when some black eyed peas harvested from the "less lawn more food" project 5 years are now taking over another lawn. They weren't even planted, just thrown onto the ground before some rains started.

 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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...when you are washing jars to can up some stuff and realize you didn't get all the grease from yesterday's mower repairs out from under your fingernails...
 
Posts: 105
Location: Southern Manitoba...bald(ish) prairie, zone 2b/3
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...when you visit a UNESCO World Heritage Site and you are in awe of the water handling and stone buildings pre-Iron Age humans erected that are still standing...in an earthquake zone.  Marvellous...I have a new post in my head, but haven't processed the photos to go along with it yet.

20240427DSC_0028StoneWaterChannels.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20240427DSC_0028StoneWaterChannels.jpg]
20240426DSC_0922CitadelMP.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20240426DSC_0922CitadelMP.jpg]
 
Jay Angler
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I went out to chop and drop the comfrey. I knew I would have to chop and drop my way *to* the comfrey because it's cleavers season, which was a job in itself.

Alas, as I worked my way towards my goal, I kept seeing brigades of bees all over the comfrey flowers. Yep, you know you're a permie when you delay your chop and drop goal so the bees can have a feast!
 
pollinator
Posts: 480
Location: south-central ME, USA - zone 5a/4b
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Jay Angler wrote:I went out to chop and drop the comfrey. I knew I would have to chop and drop my way *to* the comfrey because it's cleavers season, which was a job in itself.

Alas, as I worked my way towards my goal, I kept seeing brigades of bees all over the comfrey flowers. Yep, you know you're a permie when you delay your chop and drop goal so the bees can have a feast!



I do mine in patches, always leaving one or two patches in flower for them, and always hit them at sunset so the bees have already gone in for the night. The hummingbirds, too, would curse my name if I didn't make sure a patch or two flowering.

You know you're a permie when planting a simple garden bed requires juggling 6 to 8 seed packs as you carefully interplant a polyculture modeled on a forest ecosystem.

And you know you're a permie when your succession planting to follow the garlics, tomatoes, peppers and onions has started before the corn has even had a chance to sprout.

Also, you know you're a permie when part of your garden and landscape design is to put cat attracting catnip on your hugleculture beds because you know your tomatoes, cabbages and sweet potatoes are going to attract mice

...oh, and you really know you're a permie when you have trouble settling on which examples of yourself "complicating things beyond reason" to build soil, enhance biological activity, save yourself work and maintenance later, and reduce future heartache to share on a permies thread ;)
 
What are you doing in my house? Get 'em tiny ad!
full time farm crew job w/ housing
https://permies.com/t/178213/jobs-offered/experiences/full-time-farm-crew-member
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