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You know you're a permie when...

 
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Michael Moreken wrote:When you stop digging up dandelions and start letting go to the wind.   Chickens LOVE dandelion leaves.



When you start sharing your dandelion leaves with your chickens.
One for me, one for them, one for me, one for them...
 
pioneer
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You know you are a permie when....

You can convince a family member to try a hugelkultur bed, and they are convinced it is the right way to proceed based on 1 flimsily built short hugel-like bed for tomatoes that did better than anything else planted that year!!
 
pollinator
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…you’re dressing up so you put on the ‘nicest’ pair of shoes you have, which also happen to be your only pair of ‘heels.’

#basedonatruestory
My-only-pair-of-heels-.jpg
[Thumbnail for My-only-pair-of-heels-.jpg]
 
pollinator
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When your version of connecting with your generation is carrying your portable speaker with you to listen to Taylor Swift while you chop blackberries and cut firewood. You come back satisfied because you left the blackberries to mulch the fruit trees and didn't eliminate the naturally-occurring tree guilds in the abandoned orchard, but you don't remember any of the songs you listened to because you were too proud that you thought of a way to use cut blackberries as a double-purpose mulch and grazer repellent for your future potato patch.
 
Alana Rose
pollinator
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…you daydream about permies click bait forum post titles

& …you daydream about catchphrases that might be clever before the tiny ads on permies.com
 
master gardener
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... you covet your neighbor's mulch pile!
 
steward & bricolagier
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Jay Angler wrote:... you covet your neighbor's mulch pile!


Their goat poop pile... :D
 
Pearl Sutton
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Inspired by my mom, who wanted to know where I planned to put those seeds I was starting...
I don't know, the garage space is full and the weather is still unstable.
But hey, I have to start more seeds....  moral imperative.
:D
 
Marie Abell
pollinator
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When you're sitting in a bar alone and you should be scrolling facebook or swiping tinder like a good millennial, but instead you're looking up predator-resistant fowl for your new homestead and searching up local alternatives to chinese herbs for a solid covid cure...
 
gardener
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When you discover a new, unexpected reason that not using shampoo or other chemicals on your hair is great. You can just revel in cuteness overload rather than worry if the adorable baby goat determinedly trying to eat your hair is ingesting any kind of hormone disrupting toxic gick!
 
steward
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When you're driving down the road, whether in the city or the country, and thinking the whole time, "We could do some permaculture there, and there, and over there, and yeah pretty much everywhere!"
 
gardener
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Steve Thorn wrote:When you're driving down the road, whether in the city or the country, and thinking the whole time, "We could do some permaculture there, and there, and over there, and yeah pretty much everywhere!"


Had to do some driving around today and I definitely was thinking those thoughts! 😂
 
pollinator
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When, riding along on a long road trip, you pass the time by trying to identify edibles at 70mph.
 
master gardener
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When you find yourself begging the chipmunks to please at least leave you one sweet potato plant...🥺
 
Jay Angler
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You know your son's a permie when he arrives home after work all excited to tell you about the happy goat he saw munching a big mouthful of  green leafy stuff and it inspired him as to what to make for dinner. Who else would get dinner inspiration from a hungry goat, than a permie?
 
Pearl Sutton
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I can't mow my lawn yet. I haven't finished harvesting or moving all the edible weeds yet!

I have some excellent soup in the fridge that was last night's dinner that involved wild onions...
The front lawn did get mowed, so all I couldn't move easily went into the broth. I left lots of babies to grow. :D
Yum!

Weeds? I don't think so!!

 
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You don't worry about fertilizer shortages or gas prices because you don't use fertilizer (just compost and manure), and you bike or drive your electric car so it's been ages since you bought gas.
 
Pearl Sutton
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When you are pulling weeds and feel the burn of light contact dermatitis...
So you go in, wash up. All better!
Go back out to work....

So.
I wonder what I was reacting to? Was it this one? (Rub a bit on my arm.) Nope. How about this? Nope.
Experiments!! Not always involved with common sense.

Never did figure it out.
Rubbed all kinds of stuff on myself.

:D
 
gardener
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Found chickens snacking on your rose bush and instead of getting mad, you think " yeah! Knock out rose is not just ornamental" and feed more petals to the chickens.
 
Cindy Haskin
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Pearl Sutton wrote:When you are pulling weeds and feel the burn of light contact dermatitis...
So you go in, wash up. All better!
Go back out to work....

So.
I wonder what I was reacting to? Was it this one? (Rub a bit on my arm.) Nope. How about this? Nope.
Experiments!! Not always involved with common sense.

Never did figure it out.
Rubbed all kinds of stuff on myself.

:D


Speaking of experiments;
While living in Florida I ran the mower through a sand pile, walking barefoot behind it. Fire ants were all over my feet inflicting pinpoints of pain. Days later I had tiny pimple spots all over my feet. My brain said "hmm. wonder if it's from the ants? Let's experiment and find out."

I allowed some other ants to bite my feet, and again there were the tiny pustules on my feet. I proclaimed it a successful experiment.

Not sure if that qualifies as knowing you are a permie when... but it is similar to Pearl's blurb!
 
Jenny Wright
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Cindy Haskin wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:When you are pulling weeds and feel the burn of light contact dermatitis...
So you go in, wash up. All better!
Go back out to work....

So.
I wonder what I was reacting to? Was it this one? (Rub a bit on my arm.) Nope. How about this? Nope.
Experiments!! Not always involved with common sense.

Never did figure it out.
Rubbed all kinds of stuff on myself.

:D


Speaking of experiments;
While living in Florida I ran the mower through a sand pile, walking barefoot behind it. Fire ants were all over my feet inflicting pinpoints of pain. Days later I had tiny pimple spots all over my feet. My brain said "hmm. wonder if it's from the ants? Let's experiment and find out."

I allowed some other ants to bite my feet, and again there were the tiny pustules on my feet. I proclaimed it a successful experiment.

Not sure if that qualifies as knowing you are a permie when... but it is similar to Pearl's blurb!


Sure it's permies! Your first response was not to spread poison but observe and learn!
 
steward
Posts: 6513
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
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When, on your smartphone, you try to tap the apple 🍎 to give to someone on permies, but your thumb still has cobwebs on it from rummaging through saved/to-be-reused/gardening/tool items in the barn closet.

Cobwebby thumbs don't work well! 😄 Haha!
 
pollinator
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When you can't even scratch your butt without first pondering whether the way you're doing it reflects proper permaculture philosophy.
 
pollinator
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I think that the permie response to an itchy butt is not reflection on philosophy, but why your butt itches and what natural treatment can be used.
 
pioneer
Posts: 436
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Robin Katz wrote:I think that the permie response to an itchy butt is not reflection on philosophy, but why your butt itches and what natural treatment can be used.



Or what systemic dysfunction in the way you design your life leads to the situation where you have an itchy butt. (How to design out itchy butts)
 
Dc Stewart
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I believe that the philosophical requirement is satisfied when your method embodies Resilience and Sustainability; i.e., it respects and preserves itchiness as a natural feature of posterior ecology, and you can skritch for hours on end without ill effects.
 
Pearl Sutton
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When you almost cry as you slaughter volunteer plants...

I had a reason though.
Part of my squash bug strategy this year is to not plant anything in the squash/curcubit family for a while, to starve the overwintered bugs, cut down on the breeding population.

I think these were probably cantaloupes, I don't hot compost, I bury my kitchen waste. Anything that came up from my scraps were things that were from melons that were not worth saving the seeds, as I save seeds obsessively out of my groceries.

Still. I hated to kill them off, even knowing I can't feed the bugs.
I hate killing volunteers.

But I hate the squash beetles more.

I'll keep telling myself that.
 
pollinator
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I read a maxim somewhere (and I can't find the quote anywhere, so not sure of its source) that goes something like:

"A gardener has a heart of gold and a soul of flint."

Which means: the will to be utterly ruthless when that is the right choice.
 
Pearl Sutton
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When your permie instincts are not always in your best interests...
I got hurt the other day, not badly, but I was activity constrained for a couple of days.
My tomatoes are getting out of the garage, finally, poor over grown leggy things, some are staking out at over 2.5 feet tall.

I was carrying 4 pots of them, two in each hand, end of the work day, tired, tripped and fell. I had no time to consciously decide, I protected the plants I was carrying. I hit on my knees and face. Ow.

BUT! The tomatoes survived, they all spilled soil, one lost a secondary stalk (that I planted anyway, never know with tomatoes) but they are all doing fine.

My permie instincts are apparently "protect the plants!" Glad I didn't get hurt worse...
Need to find a balance here   :D
 
Heather Sharpe
gardener
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When your meals change based on what "weeds" are overabundant in your yard throughout the year. First it was nettles, chickweed and violet. Then goldenrod shoots. Now onto grape leaves and soon lambs quarters.

When you've done so much scrounging through other people's trash that you have a favorite alley and sometimes not-so-jokingly talk about the night before trash pickup being "Trash Day Eve" as if it were a holiday.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:When you almost cry as you slaughter volunteer plants...

I had a reason though.
Part of my squash bug strategy this year is to not plant anything in the squash/curcubit family for a while, to starve the overwintered bugs, cut down on the breeding population.

I think these were probably cantaloupes, I don't hot compost, I bury my kitchen waste. Anything that came up from my scraps were things that were from melons that were not worth saving the seeds, as I save seeds obsessively out of my groceries.

Still. I hated to kill them off, even knowing I can't feed the bugs.
I hate killing volunteers.

But I hate the squash beetles more.

I'll keep telling myself that.

I would have potted those babies up ( I am saving cans to do this next year) and sold them for 1.00 each.  You didn't kill them, someone now has  cantaloupe plants, and you have a bit more money to spend on more seeds.  Win/win.

 
gardener
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When you transplant volunteer box elders...
 
Pearl Sutton
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William Bronson wrote: When you transplant volunteer box elders...


I have the opposite problem...
When you pull Redbud tree babies as invasive weeds.
They are cute for a couple of weeks in the spring,I'll give them that. But then the only other thing they do is throw thousands of seeds.
I want edible. I want trees that are more than one trick ponies.
Fruit trees have flowers at the same time, AND make yummy food for me and the critters.
Out you go, one trick redbuds!

And thinking of invasive, I noticed my sunroots are definitely growing from seed. Volunteers in my garden beds downwind of them. Haven't decided what to do there yet. Don't want them there, but... Hard to pull them as invasive weeds.
 
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When your neighbours came to ask you how to grow 'x', and not only do you convince them to grow 'n', but you talk them into ripping out the lawn, planting the front verge, AND they let you install an insect and reptile waterer and native bee hotel in their front yards. Six houses on my street and counting. Hello from Australia!
 
Myron Platte
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Jan Lesley wrote:When your neighbours came to ask you how to grow 'x', and not only do you convince them to grow 'n', but you talk them into ripping out the lawn, planting the front verge, AND they let you install an insect and reptile waterer and native bee hotel in their front yards. Six houses on my street and counting. Hello from Australia!



I’d like to know how you do that!
 
Carla Burke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

William Bronson wrote: When you transplant volunteer box elders...


I have the opposite problem...
When you pull Redbud tree babies as invasive weeds.
They are cute for a couple of weeks in the spring,I'll give them that. But then the only other thing they do is throw thousands of seeds.
I want edible. I want trees that are more than one trick ponies.
Fruit trees have flowers at the same time, AND make yummy food for me and the critters.
Out you go, one trick redbuds!

And thinking of invasive, I noticed my sunroots are definitely growing from seed. Volunteers in my garden beds downwind of them. Haven't decided what to do there yet. Don't want them there, but... Hard to pull them as invasive weeds.



Redbuds are edible, medicinal, and the pollinators LOVE them. From this site (http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/c/cercis-canadensis=redbud.php): "Edible parts of Redbud: Flowers - raw or pickled. A nice refreshing acid taste, the flowers are rich in vitamin C and make a pleasant addition to salads. They can also be used as a condiment. The unopened buds are pickled or used as a caper substitute."
And from this one(https://www.eattheweeds.com/eastern-red-bud-pea-pods-on-a-tree/): "Buds raw, pickled or cooked. Flowers raw or cooked, young pods fried. Flowers fry nicely as well. Young leaves edible, raw or cooked. Regarding the flowers, the light colored upper part of the blossom is sweet, the darker lower part is bitter. Some folks removed the lower bitter part before eating. It’s a personal choice."
Maybe the problem is the solution?
 
William Bronson
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I suffer the little box elders to live, so clearly I actively value redbud.

I want to try the pods while they are still green.
They reportedly eat like snowpeas.
No clear reports on humans eating the dried seeds, but birds are said to like them.
That's the main draw,fodder for chookens.

Hopefully this will be the year where the mulberries prove their worth as fodder .
Last year the girls wouldn't eat them, which puzzled me, until I realized they were probably full from all the cicadas they has eaten 😅
 
Jenny Wright
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When you let things you didn't like flower in the garden anyway because the pollinators are having a party! I'm looking at you, cilantro and bitter bolting lettuce and bok choi varieties.
 
William Bronson
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When weeding your front "lawn" consists of trying to kill the last of the grass.
 
Jan Lesley
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Myron Platte wrote:

Jan Lesley wrote:When your neighbours came to ask you how to grow 'x', and not only do you convince them to grow 'n', but you talk them into ripping out the lawn, planting the front verge, AND they let you install an insect and reptile waterer and native bee hotel in their front yards. Six houses on my street and counting. Hello from Australia!



I’d like to know how you do that!



Haha! The secret!

First, have a great garden, so they all come and ask you garden questions.  Make sure your front yard is 'tidy' permaculture, not messy. Then - this is key - tell them whatever idea they had is excellent. Then ask them if they ever considered growing 'the other thing' because you know/heard/had experience with it, it's easy care, it gives you 'this' AND 'this', perfect for the area, and supports the animals and insects (Animal kindness is a big draw card in Australia).

The whole time they're eyeing off your front yard, with pomegranates the size of a kid's head, and your columnar apples, and your ornamental pear street trees that you grafted Nashi pears onto; the ones that are three times the trunk girth of anyone else's. They look at the orchard butterflies and dragonflies flitting around, the geko drinking at your in-ground bubble fountain made from a bucket and solar pump, bees and hoverflies everywhere. Then they look back at their dead grass lawn.

Then you gotta judge how softened they are, if they're ripe, you back off, a bit like fishing.... you show them your backyard, no grass, plenty of food, plenty of ornamentals, plenty of grapes, park benches with brugmansia flowers dripping overhead, for the same expense as keeping a lawn. Send them home with a box of fruit and veg, and the vague suggestion that they don't have to be a mad rat gardener like you, but they could easily be self sufficient in potatoes and chillies and asparagus every year if they dug up a couple of metres of lawn and put in a veggie bed. Asparagus is a big sell. Some people need two front yard chats... but as other neighbours go along, it's usually one long chat. Maybe suggest youtube videos they can watch, depending on the person.

Generally within two or three weeks, I have them coming around asking if I will design their garden if they rip out the lawns. To which I say yes, and do it for free. Another key point - don't show that you're jubilant, be a bit serious.

It was so much easier after the first neighbour, cuz then I tell them to ask them how that person/people' garden is doing, and they can see a beautiful garden and front verge full of broad beans and geraniums in full bloom, middle of winter, no lawn - and usually when the grocery savings as opposed to garden expenses is mentioned by them, it's a done deal in their subconscious. Plus also not wasting time slaving at the lawn every spare second. Plus they have me to run to when there's issues and advice needed, so they feel supported.

That works for me!
 
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