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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Animal Care.

In this Badge Bit you will feed appropriate kitchen scraps to an animal(s). This means you are not feeding that animal any scraps that include members of its own species.



Here are some related articles on it:
 - Cutting Chicken Feed Bill by 100%
 - Feeding Pigs Kitchen Scraps
 - What Do Goats Really Eat?

This video and its description is an example of feeding appropriate kitchen scraps to animals.

Miles Smith Farm wrote: Grappone Center refrigerates kitchen scraps for our pigs and cows (no meat is allowed.)   We feed the kale, lettuce and veggies to the cattle and bread, pasta and pastries to the older sows and our boar, Bucky.





This video is a good example of feeding chickens appropriate kitchen scraps:



To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
 - you must feed appropriate kitchen scraps to an animal
 - you must share at least eight gallons of scraps
 - may be over multiple events but the volume needs to clearly total at least 8 gallons

To show you've completed this Badge Bit, you must:
 - post a rough description of the kitchen scraps and how they're appropriate for the animal
 - post a picture of your buckets of kitchen scraps
 - post a picture of an animal(s) eating your buckets of kitchen scraps
 - OR a video of the kitchen scraps being brought out and the animal(s) eating it will suffice, too
COMMENTS:
 
steward
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Is there a minimum bucket size?  My food scraps (compost) holder in the kitchen is about a gallon, would that work?
 
steward
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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Mike Jay wrote:Is there a minimum bucket size?  My food scraps (compost) holder in the kitchen is about a gallon, would that work?




Good question!  I updated the part about bucket size.

 
Mike Haasl
steward
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Approved BB submission
Ok, I think I have this one completed.  I get organic food scraps each week from a nearby intentional community.  We also collect our own food scraps.  My bucket is about a gallon, theirs is 5 gallons.  The pictures represent two of my buckets and two of theirs (probably 3-4 gallons of food in each of their buckets) for a total of 8-10 gallons of food scraps.  They mainly consist of fruit and veggie scraps (apple cores, herb/green stalks, outer cabbage leaves, juicer pressings, peels, etc) with some egg shells mixed in.  They're appropriate for chickens because 1/3rd or more of their diet is supposed to be green stuff, 1/3 seeds and 1/3 meat (as I understand it) so this satisfies a bunch of their green needs and a small bit of their seed needs (melon seeds, apple seeds, etc).  The egg shells return some calcium into their system.

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Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this BB is complete.

 
Posts: 32
Location: CA . 3000 ft elevation, mostly southwestern slope , zone 9a
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Approved BB submission
As the garden winds for the year and market season is over, there's about to be a lot less fresh produce going through our kitchen over the next few months. But for now there's still plenty of kitchen scrap snacks as we dehydrate,  can and freeze anything we have left still. Its a good buffet today for the birds. Four , five gallon buckets.This week they get mostly bok choy, pepper tops and seeds , tomatoes seeds and skins , some sweet potatoe and carrot skins cucumber skins a little lettuce and a few watermelons that probably should have been eaten already. As far as produce goes, or the most part. if I wouldn't consider eating it if I was starving, I usually dont feed it to the birds. Food that has started to turn usually goes to the compost pile.
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Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl approved this submission.

 
pollinator
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Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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Don’t turn your animals into cannibals makes sense (break pathogen cycles etc...)

What about feeding egg shells back to hens? It is usually recommended so they get their calcium back.

Our daily routine includes taking kitchen waste to the hens. We never let more than about 2 litres build up in a day, and never a bucket worth at once. I presume multiple photos of multiple composts scraps is the way forward?
 
Mike Haasl
steward
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I think for the purposes of this BB, feeding egg shells back to hens is acceptable.

I just modified the requirements to allow for smaller buckets.  Just make sure the volume is clearly enough in total.  No edge cases
 
author & gardener
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Location: Southeastern U.S. - Zone 7b
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Approved BB submission
Kitchen and garden scraps are a regular part of our critters' diet. The chickens get it as compost, and the goats get it in what I call "goat salad." Scraps vary daily, depending on what's coming out of the kitchen: winter squash, pumpkin, potato, sunchokes, carrots, turnips, greens of all kinds (garden grown and foraged), organic banana peel, citrus rind, melon rinds, apple cores and peels, broccoli stalks and leaves, cabbage cores and leaves, sweet potato, daikon, tough okra pods, pea and bean pods. Goats don't have bottom teeth, so everything is chopped to bite-size.

It will take a series of days to make the required 8 gallons, so I'll be using this 2-gallon bowl as a measure.

Stainless steel bowl marked at 2, 4, and 6 quarts.

For 8 gallons, I'll need 32 quarts.

From left to right, day 1 (4 quarts), day 2 (4 quarts), and day 3 (6 quarts).

From left to right, day 4 (6 quarts), day 5 (6 quarts), and day 6 (6 quarts).

Amounts:
Day 1 - 4 quarts
Day 2 - 4 quarts
Day 3 - 6 quarts
Day 4 - 6 quarts
Day 5 - 6 quarts
Day 6 - 6 quarts
Total - 32 quarts

Happy goats eating their goat salad!
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl approved this submission.

 
Posts: 19
Location: Barcelona
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BB submission flagged incomplete
Hi. The quantity specified would not be appropriate nurture for my critters. Can I modify this to daily snack box apple core, carrot peels, cucumber ends, bell pepper hearts,  etc. diced fine plus a good variety urban forage? I'm six months in and have definitely hit your bucket tally over time. Forage pic assortment and more can be found between our apartment and school - a walk I take six times a day because it's Spain and kids come home for lunch. (Or should I stop trying to make quail care match chicken goals? Be honest. I can take it.)
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An apple core a day...
An apple core a day...
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In the aviary
In the aviary
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Local urban green forage
Local urban green forage
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 1
Note: I think this will be very hard to do for quail. But not impossible. But you'd need to prove that you've given them 8 gallons over time. Seems like it would be waaaay too many pictures for the effort. Plus foraged greens don't count, it has to be kitchen scraps

 
Eileen Kirkland
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No worries. I'll mentally file it under PEX/PEA. It still makes me happy. Which forum, if any, is quail-centric? I think there's a set of skills to show for them, like, build an aviary, correct handling, create a no-stink system, show healthy feet/birds not on wire, upcycle a safe transport box, swap roos with a pal, etc. I just do these things because I want to,but it would be cool to drum up some enthusiasm.
 
Mike Haasl
steward
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We don't have too much quail-centric stuff but in the Straw level of animal care there are a couple items with "quail" written on them.  Nothing more advanced than what you see is likely to appear in PEP.  Maybe PEA?
 
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