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Some PEP badges allow for oddball points.  This was introduced in this thread.

When submitting something in the official Oddball badge, you get points based on the time it would take a professional to do the same task if they have a bit of luck.

When submitting something within a badge that allows oddball points (Homesteading, Metalworking, etc), they are based on the time it would take a talented newbie to do the same task.

When you did something that should be in a badge but there isn't a BB for it, post about it in that badge and maybe it will become a BB.  If that badge allows oddball points, you can submit it there, otherwise it has to go into Oddball badge.

Some examples:
You welded up a 20 foot unicorn - put it into the Metalworking Oddball thread
You made a candle - put it in the regular Oddball thread since it isn't a clear fit for an existing badge
You build a pump house - post it in Homesteading since it should be a BB there and/or put it in Homesteading Oddball
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steward
Posts: 8857
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2544
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I'd like to submit this for Electrical Oddball points:

I was putting tongue and groove boards up in the basement and found a spot where a wire was run under the floor joists instead of through them (it's the white romex one).  It ran from an outlet in a finished wall to a junction box in the ceiling (luckily).  So I had to disconnect it in the junction box, drill holes in the joists and re-run it back to the box.

If I had to call this project something, I'd name it "Relocate existing wire run less than 20 feet".
Who-ran-this-wire-under-the-joists-(not-me).jpg
Who ran this wire under the joists!?!?!?!?! (not me)
Who ran this wire under the joists!?!?!?!?! (not me)
New-holes-and-wire-running-through-them.jpg
New holes and wire running through them
New holes and wire running through them
Connected-back-up-in-the-box.jpg
Connected back up in the box
Connected back up in the box
All-done.jpg
All done
All done
Staff note (r ranson) :

I hereby certify this for 0.5 points of electric oddballness.

 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 8857
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2544
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I have another oddball electrical submission.  I installed a circulating pump for my greenhouse heat battery.  I needed to wire on a cord/plug to plug it into an outlet and see if everything worked.  This was wired well enough to be its permanent power source.
Pump-(Before)-although-I-had-already-installed-the-cable-clamp.jpg
Pump (Before) although I had already installed the cable clamp
Pump (Before) although I had already installed the cable clamp
Wiring-underway.jpg
Wiring underway
Wiring underway
All-done-.jpg
All done!
All done!
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this BB for 1/2 point.

 
master pollinator
Posts: 459
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I am submitting for consideration my work installing a new battery bank for my household off-grid solar system.  It is a 48 volt system in which the batteries started going bad last winter.  I kept pulling bad batteries out of the bank so they wouldn't be an extra drain on the remaining ones, hoping to stretch the life of the bunch out as long as I could.  However, I did shop around and purchase the 8 new batteries so I'd have them ready to go in.  I was initially going to get the exact same brand battery but after much searching I found a different brand that was roughly $1000 cheaper for the set.  (I hate shopping but with that kind of savings it was like getting paid several hundred dollars an hour to do it!!)  The downside was that these new ones have a different style connector so I needed to buy materials/tools to make new jumpers as well.  (This extra cost was factored into the final price I might add.)  At some point I plan to make a detailed blog post about the whole process at my blog site, www.theartisthomestead.com, but it hasn't happened yet.

The hardest part was moving these batteries around myself at over 150 lbs each.  (lift with your legs not your back!)  Unfortunately the freight truck that delivered them couldn't drop them off at all close to where they go, but I knew that from the start.  I'll include some shots of making the jumpers and then wiring it all together.  Four batteries each get wired into series making a 48 volt set, with 2 sets total.  Then the sets are wired in parallel together.  It wasn't a hard job.  All told I think I spent 2 or 3 hours removing the old batteries, making the cables, and installing the new ones.  You could add a couple more hours for hauling the batteries from the end of my drive to the pole barn on the back edge of the property, but that's not really electrical work.

Hmm...  I got a "comment too long" error.  I guess I'll delete some of the photos.  If you want more let me know and I'll post them in a second comment.

battery-bank1.JPG
The pallet of new batteries dropped off at in the road at the end of my driveway.
The pallet of new batteries dropped off at in the road at the end of my driveway.
battery-bank2.JPG
The tools and supplies to make new jumper cables.
The tools and supplies to make new jumper cables.
battery-bank5.JPG
Using my new crimping tool needed for crimping ends this large. I got to whack it hard with a big hammer!
Using my new crimping tool needed for crimping ends this large. I got to whack it hard with a big hammer!
battery-bank8.JPG
Attaching the new cables to the battery terminals.
Attaching the new cables to the battery terminals.
battery-bank9.JPG
I initially just put the first 4 in place, but didn't connect them into the system. I wanted to squeeze as much life out of the old as possible. They lasted until mid September! (My power was going out a lot at night toward the end!)
I initially just put the first 4 in place, but didn't connect them into the system. I wanted to squeeze as much life out of the old as possible. They lasted until mid September! (My power was going out a lot at night toward the end!)
battery-bank10.JPG
All the new batteries installed and wired together. Ahh... A fresh battery bank with lots of capacity again. How long can I make this one last?
All the new batteries installed and wired together. Ahh... A fresh battery bank with lots of capacity again. How long can I make this one last?
Staff note (Mike Haasl) :

I certify this BB for 2 points. Plus an air badge in Electricity!

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