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paul wheaton wrote:what have i left out?



I don't think you've left things out, but except for the hugelbeds, I don't think there enough linear progression from 1 badge to the next.
 
pollinator
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William Schlegel wrote:"all of this is completed without imports (except seeds) from more than 500 feet away" Here is a quote from the second badge level. To do the second badge level with this requirement on my current property I would need to plant some poplars where I plan to do a future Hugel and wait! Or do it somewhere else.



I've seen this concern a number of times in the comments. I think it could be easily qualified by saying "from more than 500 feet away from the property." That puts all resources from your OWN property (or property you manage) within range.
 
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Also, please keep in mind that this is the PEP program.  Which is Permaculture Experience according to Paul and is oriented very heavily towards his site.  Many of the things in PEP won't work well in other climates or an urban environment.  

That's where the PEL program could take over.  Or the PEM program.  That is, Lauren's version or Mike's version.  Lauren's might be specifically for conditions in her area of Utah.  Mine might be a really good program for cold forested areas.  Mine wouldn't have any excavator use in it (since I don't have one) but it might focus more on things like cordwood construction, foraging, maple syrup, etc.
 
Lauren Ritz
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Mike Jay wrote:That's where the PEL program could take over.  Or the PEM program.  That is, Lauren's version or Mike's version.  Lauren's might be specifically for conditions in her area of Utah.  Mine might be a really good program for cold forested areas.  Mine wouldn't have any excavator use in it (since I don't have one) but it might focus more on things like cordwood construction, foraging, maple syrup, etc.



My point is that there are many people in other environments who could easily use PEP with just a few minor wording changes. Several have said this is good for them who are in very different environments, which tells me that the list and structure WORKS for a large number of people. Without changing any part of the intent, this could reach a much broader base. By changing "within 500 feet" to "on the property" it is opened up to people who have much larger properties while maintaining the intent of not using imported materials.

My own structure would probably be PESD (Permaculture Experience Small scale Desert) rather than PEL, just because people are going to look at the L and say "who's that?" And for those who read aloud, PESD might make someone laugh.
 
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paul wheaton wrote:
   - at least three sunchokes
   



I think anyone that builds a hugelkultur with at least three sunchokes is soon going to have a hugelkultur with a monocrop of sunchokes :)
 
Mike Haasl
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Good point Lauren.  Having PEP as broad as Paul is willing would enable it to be completed by more people in more places.
 
Jesus Martinez
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Trace Oswald wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:
   - at least three sunchokes
   



I think anyone that builds a hugelkultur with at least three sunchokes is soon going to have a hugelkultur with a monocrop of sunchokes :)



Not if you have a good underground rodent population.
 
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I could totally get behind this, but my questions is, Sepp's grain specifically?  Does it have a name and somewhere i could acquire it?  I'm looking for something good to build my soil.  

Big side question: Have you done a separate post about Sepp's grain?  I've seen you show it off in the videos from time to time and talk about it but i wasn't sure if it had a post of its own with information about how/what it does to build soil vs others of its type, grow zones, water/heat tolerance, disease issues ect.

Thanks in advance.
 
Jonathan Ward
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Forget my previous post.  I found the thread about Sepp's grain.
 
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Reading this makes me wonder about including tasks related to enhancing pollinators and beneficial insects and birds. I saw earlier that Mike said bug hotels and such might be in animal husbandry. Is that accurate? Because planting for polinators and good bugs is an important aspect of gardening. With honeybees as major pollinators being threatened it seems critical to ensure that any education or certification or badge that is designed to promote permaculture should make sure to include them.

Save the bees!
 
Mike Haasl
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I'm pretty sure that planting for the bugs will be somewhere in the PEP system.  Either in critter care or gardening.  Bug hotels could go in critter care or in woodworking.  There's lots of overlap so as long as we don't miss something, we'll be all set
 
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Trace Oswald wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:
   - at least three sunchokes
   


I think anyone that builds a hugelkultur with at least three sunchokes is soon going to have a hugelkultur with a monocrop of sunchokes :)




;-) Maybe not: If you have deer, they seem to relish the young sunchoke sprouts like I relish asparagus. I once [only once] had the great idea of growing Jerusalem artichoke in my garden. Thank goodness my soil is super sandy or I would still be chasing them outa there! It took me 3 years of really going after them to remove them from my garden.
But I really like sunchokes, so I planted them outside of the garden, thinking I could make a hedge of them on the west side of the orchard. Since they are in the sunflower family, I was dreaming that my bees would have sunchoke blossoms to work. The deer discovered the nascent hedge and they went methodically north to south and ate them all up. Later, they came back [the sunchokes] ...but so did the deer. The sunchokes eventually lost. :-(
 
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Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:
   - at least three sunchokes
   


I think anyone that builds a hugelkultur with at least three sunchokes is soon going to have a hugelkultur with a monocrop of sunchokes :)




;-) Maybe not: If you have deer, they seem to relish the young sunchoke sprouts like I relish asparagus. I once [only once] had the great idea of growing Jerusalem artichoke in my garden. Thank goodness my soil is super sandy or I would still be chasing them outa there! It took me 3 years of really going after them to remove them from my garden.
But I really like sunchokes, so I planted them outside of the garden, thinking I could make a hedge of them on the west side of the orchard. Since they are in the sunflower family, I was dreaming that my bees would have sunchoke blossoms to work. The deer discovered the nascent hedge and they went methodically north to south and ate them all up. Later, they came back [the sunchokes] ...but so did the deer. The sunchokes eventually lost. :-(




I must have  a deer and rodent deficit then, what started out as an 1.5 by 2 ft  patch has taken over about 200 sq ft of my garden.  The idea of planting them anywhere else in my yard gives me hives, but they are very pretty in bloom.
 
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chinampas and terraces that are strong enough for cattle and deeper/bigger than a waru waru. integration with critters.
and the deviant versions of the above and hugelkultur.
dew catchment "arrays"
interesting usages of plants. plant reacherch on guilds and such
variants of food forests frost catchements using plants and such (some of this could also be applied to earthworks)
documentation of speed of work over long periods

for another badge type content creation might be an important one

scale is quite important, like what scale operations have you created/ managed

business could cover sales and such... 1 am here so creativity is up at the expense of sanity

something about planting crops in animal pasture

systems that paul or mods approve of

you could also do a badge about programming and such for like work ethic and such

sub badges for specific niches that are within the badges... have you asked geoff about this yet or any of the other lords dukes and david holmgren some sort of more detailed certification for pdcs would be nice like what teachers you have learned from and what you learned...

yep this is deteriorating gn all
 
Mike Haasl
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I believe I've just completed the Gardening badge.
Ruth Stout Composting
Build a hugelcultur
Chop and drop
Staff note (Mike Barkley):

Well done Mike. I certify this badge.

 
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What about starting fruit/nut/soil-building trees/shrubs from cuttings?  I just started 51 fruit tree cuttings.  It'll be a few weeks before I know how many of them "took", but already quite a few are showing new growth, and at least one already had a small root on it when I potted it up.

For Texas, Texas mountain laurel, Texas redbud, and retama (palo verde) are good, native leguminous trees.  I would like to propose a Texas version (maybe more than one--we have seven different climates in Texas) that includes growing one of those three, either from cuttings or seeds (Texas mountain laurel, in particular, is very slow-growing).  I hesitate to include mesquite because of its invasiveness.
 
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Rosie Carducci wrote:What about starting fruit/nut/soil-building trees/shrubs from cuttings?  I just started 51 fruit tree cuttings.  It'll be a few weeks before I know how many of them "took", but already quite a few are showing new growth, and at least one already had a small root on it when I potted it up.

For Texas, Texas mountain laurel, Texas redbud, and retama (palo verde) are good, native leguminous trees.  I would like to propose a Texas version (maybe more than one--we have seven different climates in Texas) that includes growing one of those three, either from cuttings or seeds (Texas mountain laurel, in particular, is very slow-growing).  I hesitate to include mesquite because of its invasiveness.



Is this a question about a specific BB?
 
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These are my BB's for the Sand Badge in Gardening:
Build a Hugelkultur BB
Chop and Drop
Ruth Stout Gardening
Staff note (Mike Haasl):

Congratulations, you now have your Gardening Sand badge!

 
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I finished this 7 foot hugel today. I think that completes the sand badge.

I was certified for the other gardening sand badge BBs at the links below.

https://permies.com/wiki/10/98575/PEP-BB-gardening-sand-chopndrop#951928

https://permies.com/wiki/10/98577/PEP-BB-gardening-sand-RuthStout#892748

Staff note (Mike Haasl):

Congratulations on your first badge!

 
Mike Barkley
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The brainstorm gardening badge thread seems to be hiding good this morning so I'm adding some old forgotten notes here before they get lost too.

https://permies.com/wiki/122923/PEP-BB-gardening-straw-volunteerplants

Is there a space requirement for this? Do they all need to be together or can they be spread among a few locations in & around a garden area? All the same season or can there be spring & fall examples? Do the volunteers have to be vegetables? Would unharvested peanuts that sprouted the following year qualify as volunteers? Do different types of volunteer beans count as multiple volunteers? Same question for other veggies. Can some of it be primarily animal food rather than human food? Sorry for all the questions. Trying to clarify the situation. All sorts of wild & volunteer things growing here. Not sure how to do their photo op.


https://permies.com/wiki/103224/PEP-BB-gardening-straw-hugelkultur

Does extending the sand badge hugelkultur to meet the length requirement for the straw hugelkultur qualify? Seems like it does but that might not be the PEP/PEX intention. Or does that require a whole new one? I noticed the iron badge specifically states 6 hugelbeds.

 
Mike Haasl
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Hi Mike, my impression/assumption is that the volunteer and wild plants need to be near enough to one another to be considered a polyculture.  I'd also presume that three different types of bean wouldn't cut it.  But a bean, a pea and a peanut probably would.  I'd think spring and fall examples living in the same polyculture would be splendid.  I'm pretty sure fruits, veggies, animal fodder, medicine, fiber etc plants would fit the bill.  If it's a seasonality thing, I'd take pictures from the same spot with some clear landmarks so that as the plants and seasons change, the evaluator can know that you're showing off the same bit of ground.

For the hugelkulture I'm guessing you can extend an existing one.  But you have to add at least 12 more feet.  I'd almost propose that you should add a modest amount more because the existing hugel is occupying a fair bit of space that a freestanding hugel would have at one end.  Per my crude sketch, the brown is the Sand badge hugel and the green one is the Straw.  The area in yellow is why I'm thinking a longer hugel would be more fair.  But I'm not sure.
Straw-hugel.png
[Thumbnail for Straw-hugel.png]
 
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what have i left out?



How about some sand or straw level badge for composting, Hot compost, mushroom compost, bokashi style, etc?
 
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I believe I have my Sand badge!

Chop & Drop
Hugel Building
Ruth Stout Composting
Staff note (Mike Haasl):

Congratulations on your spiffy new badge!

 
I want my playground back. Here, I'll give you this tiny ad for it:
Learn Permaculture through a little hard work
https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
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