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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the straw badge in textiles.

In this project, you will knit or crochet a scarf. This scarf can be

a simple garter stitch (a more indepth tutorial is HERE, but you'd need to lower the needle size from 13 to 12)



A simple broken rib stitch pattern that alternates one row of k1 P2, and one row of K2 P2


A simple pattern that is the same each row, but looks lovely
K1,YO,SSK for every row
(In other words: knit 1, yarn over, slip 2 stitches to the other needle then slide left needle in front of loops and knit those two stitches together)


simple crochet pattern


Or it can be something far more complex! It's up to you!

Badge bit requirements:
 - Measure 1.5 yards/meters in length
 - if knitted, knitted with no larger than size 12 needles
 - if crochet, crocheted with no larger than a size K hook
 - must be at least 4 inches wide
 - must be made from natural yarns, such as wool, cotton, hemp, silk, linen

To document your completion of the BB, provide proof of the following as pics or video (less than two minutes):
 - knit or crochet a scarf at least 1.5 yards long (not including tassels) and 4 inches wide and not be done with giant needles.
 - your scarf in progress (somewhere around 1/3rd to 1/2 finished)
 - your completed scarf on a person
COMMENTS:
 
gardener
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Approved submission
Here is my submission for the Textiles - Straw - Stickwork - Crochet a Scarf BB.

The scarf is crochet using a 'G' needle and 100% merino wool.  I learned the 3D double crochet stitch from Fiber Spider and his 3D Crochet Tutorial. My chain-less foundation double crochet row was 5" unstretched and I discovered that I preferred how the scarf looks stretched wide not long so I blocked the finished scarf at 9" x 60" on lace wires.  The dry (blocked) scarf measured ~7" x 62" and is show on a 6'x1' blocking board.

To document the completion of the BB, I have provided the following:
- knit or crochet a scarf at least 1.5 yards long (not including tassels) and 4 inches wide and not be done with giant needles.
- your scarf in progress (somewhere around 1/3rd to 1/2 finished)
- your completed scarf on a person
1.JPG
yarn and info
yarn and info
2.JPG
crochet in progress
crochet in progress
3.JPG
dry (after blocking) on blocking board with measure tape
dry (after blocking) on blocking board with measure tape
4.JPG
60" x 7" (unstretched)
60
5.JPG
Enjoying my new scarf on a brisk morning
Enjoying my new scarf on a brisk morning
Staff note (gir bot) :

Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
Posts: 68
Location: Northeast Indiana (zone 6a)
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This scarf is made with a soft and fuzzy wool yarn (I'm not sure exactly what kind, I got it secondhand without a label but the burn test indicated it's some kind of will). I used size 8 needles and a stitch I've heard called moss stitch or seed stitch - the pattern is you cast on an odd number of stitches and alternate knit and purl, starting each row with a knit stitch, so the end texture is a series of small textured bumps. It worked really well with the softness of the yarn. The end length ended up being about 72" long and about 6" wide.
scarf-supplies.jpg
[Thumbnail for scarf-supplies.jpg]
scarf-progress.jpg
[Thumbnail for scarf-progress.jpg]
scarf-done.jpg
[Thumbnail for scarf-done.jpg]
scarf-measured.jpg
[Thumbnail for scarf-measured.jpg]
scarf-worn.jpg
[Thumbnail for scarf-worn.jpg]
 
master steward
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I hate to say this (especially since it's such a beautiful scarf that you did a great job on), but I'm pretty sure that yarn is not wool. Maybe someone else has seen a shiny wool yarn like that. In my experience, through, velvet chenille yarns are all 100% polyester or maybe a polyester mix. (I knit with it a few times, years ago, to make my coworker scarves and hats.) I've been searching google, hoping to be proved wrong, but I'm not finding any similar-looking yarn in natural fibres.
 
Jay Girardot
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Nicole Alderman wrote:I'm pretty sure that yarn is not wool.



Oh no the person who gave it to me said it was, and I must have interpreted my burn test wrong (this was my first attempt at doing a fiber burn test, so not too surprising). Thanks for pointing it out. I guess my next project will be a scarf with different yarn!
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
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Yarn purchasing is really tricky! You'll often find yarn that's called "wool," but when you look at the actual materials listed on the back, it's often 100% polyester or acrylic or a blend.



This one sold at walmart says it's "Chunky Knit Chenille Yarn, Jumbo Chenille Yarn Soft Blanket Yarn DIY Chenille Yarn Chunky Wool Yarn for Arm-Knit,Crochet, Knitting & Crafting (White, 1 Pack ."

But the actual description says, "Material: Cotton and Acrylic." Maddening!






Over on amazon, I find one that is called "Wool Wonders. "When you look at the description, it says, "✅SOFT WOOL BLEND: Wool Wonders sports a soft, single ply blend of 30% Australian Wool and 70% acrylic for crisp stitch definition and softdrape"

It should be called Acrylic Wonders, not wool, because there's a lot more acrylic in it than wool!







This one has the description of "2 Pack Chenille Velvet Yarn Knitting Wool Thick Warm Crochet Knitting Yarns for DIY Hand-Knitted Fabric Art Bag Sweater Doll 200g," but there's no wool to be found in it. It's so frustrating!!!






And yet another! This one was actually the second to show up when I searched "wool yarn" into amazon. It is from a wellknown brand, and has the gal to call itself "wool-ease" the material description begs to differ, "82% Acrylic/10% Wool/8% Rayon;"







Also on the first page of results for "wool yarn" we have: Brazilian Wool Hair, and the material description on amazon even says "Material: Wool" and the description lists such lovely things as "~ Brazilian yarn wool hair arylic yarn hair is more silky and soft for your braid and twist style.
~ Material,Brazilian yarn wool hair. It's super lightweight and natural. It twists smoothly and will blend into hair well."
But, you can see right on the package that it's actually 100% acrylic!





We can maybe give some of these companies the benefit of the doubt--maybe they think wool=yarn (like some people who think that wheat is only in "whole wheat bread" and that if they give a celiac patient "white bread," the person will be fine, because it doesn't have wheat.) But, in the end, it just means "buyer beware" for most of us. Maybe R Ranson or another person really steeped in yarn production will say differently, but I've only ever seen matte wool yarn. It's never shiny unless something else (usually acrylic or polyester, but sometimes silk) is added to it.
 
pollinator
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Approved submission
I knitted a scarf!
I designed it with a staghorn cable in the center and a moss stitch border.
I used USA size 6 needles and my own home-grown wool yarn, dyed with lichen from my yard. I used a natural, mordant-free dye process, but the wool batch didn't weigh enough to qualify for the dyeing badge bit, so that one will have to wait.


IMG_20220606_203437032.jpg
starting materials
starting materials
IMG_20220716_080558646_HDR.jpg
working the staghorn cable stitches
working the staghorn cable stitches
IMG_20220901_135352694.jpg
measuring the final length (shown folded in half, so 2 times 28 inches)
measuring the final length (shown folded in half, so 2 times 28 inches)
IMG_20220901_135559548.jpg
modeled
modeled
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.
Note: Love that your scarf is from home grown naturally dyed yarn and pattern is lovely too!

 
Paper jam tastes about as you would expect. Try some on this tiny ad:
Profitable Permaculture in the Far North with Richard Perkins - Gracie's backyard
https://permies.com/wiki/133872/videos/Profitable-Permaculture-North-Richard-Perkins
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